NP working as RN - page 2

I have seen a number of NP's working as RN's on the floor at the hospital I work. One of them told me she did not like working as an NP because of the doctors, and another said she worked as an RN to... Read More

  1. by   juan de la cruz
    Quote from core0
    Here in Georgia there are more than a couple MEPN grads working as RNs. Nobody will hire them due to lack of nursing experience.
    I can see this happening. Fortuntaley, there are no MEPN programs in Michigan.
  2. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from Ang RN 2010
    The one NP that I know well loved working as a NP, but the insurance was just so crazy high she decided to start teaching at my college.
    I paid $800 per year for malpractice insurance as an Adult NP and when I added kids, my insurance went up to $1600 per year. I don't consider this "crazy high."

    As far as pay...the RN's in my town make $20-$30 per hour and I'm making $50 per hour. It's disturbing to see so many places where NP's make less than the RN's. I'm definitely staying put, that's for sure!
  3. by   Joe NightingMale
    Just to clarify (since I've seen this confusion before) MEPN don't necessarily result in an NP or CNS. Quite a few produce the generic MSN. Though a number of these generic MSN students go directly into NP programs without working as an RN.
  4. by   Designer NP
    Quote from carachel2
    I just don't see this at all here in Texas. As I've said before, STARTING salary for NPs is in the mid 80's with a lot of people negotiating 90-95K. A *very* seasoned RN MIGHT make in the 70's here with a lot of OT, holiday pay, etc.

    I have no problem making 85K if I don't have to work 12 hour shifts, put up with floor nursing and work holidays.
    Not quite true, I make $72,000 base without lots of OT (8hrs a month) or holiday pay. I only have 2 1/2 yrs experience as a RN, 4 1/2 as a LPN. I don't see the point in going back to school for my FNP for a 10k raise. It's not worth all the responsibility to me. I just have to pull a couple overtime shifts a month and I would be well over that. I have a friend who is a FNP as well, she works incredibly too much without much pay considering she is salaried as well.
  5. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from NurseCutie
    Not quite true, I make $72,000 base without lots of OT (8hrs a month) or holiday pay. I only have 2 1/2 yrs experience as a RN, 4 1/2 as a LPN. I don't see the point in going back to school for my FNP for a 10k raise. It's not worth all the responsibility to me. I just have to pull a couple overtime shifts a month and I would be well over that. I have a friend who is a FNP as well, she works incredibly too much without much pay considering she is salaried as well.
    Do you live in the Austin area? I've heard there's an overabundance of FNP's there. However, I have friends who are seasoned RN's living there and they certainly aren't coming close to what you're making! In fact, I've never lived in any city (other than NYC) that pays their RN's what you're making.

    Does your FNP friend live in the same city where you reside? If so, then he/she can do better than that. I'm not aware of any city where the RN's make as much or more than the NP's. It just doesn't make sense. If there's an overabundance of NP's in an area, then it's the same with the RN's.
  6. by   djc1981
    Quote from NurseCutie
    Not quite true, I make $72,000 base without lots of OT (8hrs a month) or holiday pay. I only have 2 1/2 yrs experience as a RN, 4 1/2 as a LPN. I don't see the point in going back to school for my FNP for a 10k raise. It's not worth all the responsibility to me. I just have to pull a couple overtime shifts a month and I would be well over that. I have a friend who is a FNP as well, she works incredibly too much without much pay considering she is salaried as well.
    Your position seems to be the exception, and not the rule. 10K more a year for many is a whole years mortgages or luxury car payments+. You have to remember thats 10K more every year for the rest of your life -- for 2 more years of schooling. That's $100,000 more in salary in 10 years you wouldn't have made. It pays off in spades. Also, education is always a good thing, regardless of $. Knowledge truly does equal power. NPs command much more respect and generally have an overall better lifestyle. Sometimes you have to look at the entire picture.
  7. by   JDCitizen
    Quote from djc1981
    Your position seems to be the exception, and not the rule. 10K more a year for many is a whole years mortgages or luxury car payments+.
    You have to remember thats 10K more every year for the rest of your life -- for 2 more years of schooling. That's $100,000 more in salary in 10 years you wouldn't have made. It pays off in spades. Also, education is always a good thing, regardless of $. Knowledge truly does equal power. NPs command much more respect and generally have an overall better lifestyle. Sometimes you have to look at the entire picture.
    True...

    With my degree:
    I am no longer working the floor in a hospital :chuckle:chuckle and all the crap I had to put up with as a floor nurse is a memory.
    I have an office the patients come to see me
    I am working smarter not harder, not longer... Even if it would have not been much of a pay raise most anything is better than how nurses are treated in the hospital.

    of course situations vary from state to state, job to job. Even if we are all NPs situations vary so much it can be like apples to oranges.
  8. by   Designer NP
    No. I heard nurses were oversaturated in Austin as well. I live in Houston, working in the Med Center. I'm quite happy with my pay, would like more if I advanced my degree. I just don't see it to be worth it to be a FNP in my area. $10,000 is a lot of money, but not worth all the stress and schooling the job comes with. I'd seriously start thinking about it when the starting salary comes close to $100,000.
    "Also, education is always a good thing, regardless of $. Knowledge truly does equal power. NPs command much more respect and generally have an overall better lifestyle. Sometimes you have to look at the entire picture."
    Yes. I know knowledge is power regardless of money, but how much money and time would I spend on grad school??? I want to be compensated well for my education. If employers don't realize this, there will be a decrease of FNP's as well as nurses. I have to take into account my future compensation with more education, prices on everything are going up and I want to live comfortably and have more $$$ to put in the bank. I don't see things going to well for FNP's in my area. Some hospitals are having problems hiring them. If I were to go the NP route it would probaly be Acute care NP. I like the ICU and would like to do procedures. I'm a more technical person. I'm getting contradictory information about the two specialties though.
  9. by   7starbuck7
    You definitely have to look at the big picture. I make good money as a RN (80K with no overtime) but that is because I work float pool with no benefits (no vacation, no health insurance). In our float pool you have the ability to make over 95K without working overtime. But this is very hard work--physically and mentally. Not something I could do for the rest of my life.
  10. by   Joe NightingMale
    The impression I've gotten is that the choice of becoming an NP or staying an RN has more to do with working conditions than money.

    It seems that if things like poop, tense co-workers, arrogant doctors, and demanding patient bother you then the NP route is a big improvement.

    If those things don't bother you as much (and I seem to be in this group), then the NP route doesn't seem worth it.
  11. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from NurseCutie
    No. I heard nurses were oversaturated in Austin as well. I live in Houston, working in the Med Center. I'm quite happy with my pay, would like more if I advanced my degree. I just don't see it to be worth it to be a FNP in my area. $10,000 is a lot of money, but not worth all the stress and schooling the job comes with. I'd seriously start thinking about it when the starting salary comes close to $100,000.
    "Also, education is always a good thing, regardless of $. Knowledge truly does equal power. NPs command much more respect and generally have an overall better lifestyle. Sometimes you have to look at the entire picture."
    Yes. I know knowledge is power regardless of money, but how much money and time would I spend on grad school??? I want to be compensated well for my education. If employers don't realize this, there will be a decrease of FNP's as well as nurses. I have to take into account my future compensation with more education, prices on everything are going up and I want to live comfortably and have more $$$ to put in the bank. I don't see things going to well for FNP's in my area. Some hospitals are having problems hiring them. If I were to go the NP route it would probaly be Acute care NP. I like the ICU and would like to do procedures. I'm a more technical person. I'm getting contradictory information about the two specialties though.
    I know several NP's working in the Houston area and they are making good money. One of them, an ANP, works in Pearland in occupational health. Her base salary is 92K and she gets quarterly bonuses. She has a company car and outstanding benefits. The urgent care clinics in Houston are paying $50 - $65 per hour and this averages out to over 100K per year. There was a job listing for a PA/NP to work in a pain management clinic in Sugarland and the pay was 160K per year. All I can say is that the NP's you know are being taken advantage of big time!
  12. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from 7starbuck7
    You definitely have to look at the big picture. I make good money as a RN (80K with no overtime) but that is because I work float pool with no benefits (no vacation, no health insurance). In our float pool you have the ability to make over 95K without working overtime. But this is very hard work--physically and mentally. Not something I could do for the rest of my life.
    I may be wrong, but "benefits" are not what leads me to a job, pay is.
    Money can buy these benefits. I hear people all the time say their pay stinks but they get good benefits...benefits, benefits, benefits...people act like that is the driving force in whether or not they should work at one place or another. If you can make 95K a year with the right lifestyle you can sock enough away to have your own benefits if you play your cards right. This might mean you make 95K but live like you make 40K a year for awhile but what's wrong with that, when the return is much greater?
    That might mean no wide screen plasma tv or regular $200 trips to Wal Mart but who needs that, anyway?

    I understand how working agency can wear you down after awhile, but I still feel that the same principle applies. Don't be lead to a job because you are getting sometimes questionable benefits.
  13. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from ANPFNPGNP
    I know several NP's working in the Houston area and they are making good money. One of them, an ANP, works in Pearland in occupational health. Her base salary is 92K and she gets quarterly bonuses. She has a company car and outstanding benefits. The urgent care clinics in Houston are paying $50 - $65 per hour and this averages out to over 100K per year. There was a job listing for a PA/NP to work in a pain management clinic in Sugarland and the pay was 160K per year. All I can say is that the NP's you know are being taken advantage of big time!
    I used to live in Missouri City. My brother-in-law moved to another state but keeps his address in TX for income tax purposes (he is a multi-multi millionaire--something I doubt I'll ever have to worry about)

    I would think Houston would be a mecca for NP's, being one of the * world's* medical hubs.

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