Combined NNP/PNP programs - page 2

Are there any programs that offer (formally or informally) an NNP and PNP? I'm interested in both PICU and NICU, but the job market for NNPs seems to be much better than PNPs in the PICU. If... Read More

  1. by   jeepgirl
    Quote from bryanboling5
    I believe that you have to be an NNP to work with the critically ill kids. I've heard of PNPs working with feeder-growers and in follow-up clinics, but never with the true NICU babies. Maybe someone with more experience (Steve?) could comment?
    Bryan
    that may be very well true.
    i just know that an Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner is geared for Acute Care / ICU / ED experience... but they have a lot of training in trauma, ONCO, etc as well. But they can do VP shunt taps, advanced procedures, as well is my understanding.
  2. by   SarasotaRN2b
    Quote from ANPFNPGNP
    Check with your state's Board of Nursing before going through the dual programs. I live in TX and completed an Adult/Geriatric NP program in another state...I'm certified by the ANCC in both. Unfortunately, Texas WOULD NOT ACCEPT THE DUAL PROGRAM! They told me to choose between the Geriatric NP or Adult NP, so obviously I chose the Adult NP. It makes me mad that I'm not recognized by the state of TX as a Geriatric NP b/c I completed a recognized program AND I passed the exam!

    Also, there was a combination FNP/ER NP program at UT-Houston and some of their graduates couldn't get certified as EITHER in a couple of states...I believe Oregon was one of them. Those poor NP's completed an extremely difficult program and passed the FNP exam (not sure if there's an exam for ER NP?), but they will either have to go back to school or move to another state in order to work as a NP. Just because someone has graduated from a program and passed the certification boards does NOT mean they will get board certified in some states. It's absolutely ridiculous!
    But I wasn't talking about a dual program. I was stating that if you received your masters for a NNP, after competing that go for a PNP. I totally understand about the dual program, but if you've taken all the courses you needed and pass the licensing exam for the NNP, why can't you work as a NNP while going back to school for more education?

    Kris
  3. by   jeepgirl
    Quote from SarasotaRN2b
    But I wasn't talking about a dual program. I was stating that if you received your masters for a NNP, after competing that go for a PNP. I totally understand about the dual program, but if you've taken all the courses you needed and pass the licensing exam for the NNP, why can't you work as a NNP while going back to school for more education?

    Kris
    i dunno
    maybe its a thing with the school releasing your stuff too... saying you are done with the degree and all, which you have to be done with to be able to test and practice? i don't know!!

    i know in my program i did a dual PNP/nursing education tract...

    but i only got ONE MS(N).
    even though i did all those extra hours to complete the nursing education track as well.
  4. by   SteveNNP
    Quote from jeepgirl
    can an acute care PNP (not the primary care... acute care) work in the NICU?
    why not just do that?
    *technically* a AC-PNP could work in a NICU, but not many NICUs would hire you. Seeing as how NNPs study purely neonates for 2+ years, and are trained to place umbilical lines, perform delivery room resuscitation, neonatal transports, and medically manage premature/critically ill infants, a PNP would sink like a stone in NICU without major additional training and support. JMHO.
  5. by   jeepgirl
    Quote from SteveRN21
    *technically* a AC-PNP could work in a NICU, but not many NICUs would hire you. Seeing as how NNPs study purely neonates for 2+ years, and are trained to place umbilical lines, perform delivery room resuscitation, neonatal transports, and medically manage premature/critically ill infants, a PNP would sink like a stone in NICU without major additional training and support. JMHO.
    I can see what you are saying with the studying of JUST the neonate for 2+ years, as a PNP-AC would study the neonate through to early adulthood. I have always been a big proponent of specialization.

    however...

    take a look at the training a PNP-AC has and the skills list... i'm pretty sure that the skills you are talking about are on the PNP-AC skill list. Also, I have seen AC PNP's on transport duty (in my area for critical care transport - both neonatal and peds critical care / trauma), ect. These nurses are USUALLY employed in areas where there are critically ill children... so yes, PNP-AC's would be equipped to handle critically ill children. I did some prelimary searching (found the core compentencies) and neonates are included on the PNP-AC's list.

    i don't know that "sink like a stone" is a good term.

    i think there would definetly be a difference between having a neonatal NP who is trained in JUST having neonates in the NICU... rather than a PNP-AC who is trained to care for critically ill children birth through young adulthood... but sink like a stone? i think that there would probably be a learning curve or some practice differences is more like it.
    does that make sense? i hope i am explaining that right.
  6. by   SteveNNP
    Makes sense. I am not aware of PNP programs that have any sort of extended rotation through a NICU. Maybe a PNP can explain better.

    Like I said, I'm sure there are units that DO hire PNPs. They hired one here a few years ago, but she required a LOT of mentoring.

    I am considering adding a post-master's PNP certificate in a few years. I'm hoping to not have to work nights, holidays and weekends for the rest of my career.
  7. by   nytnrs
    I am a PNP and work as a RN in a NICU. I wanted to transition into a NNP position but was told that I needed to have the NNP certification to function as a NNP- thus am in school again. I will have 2 MSN degrees, 2 certifications.

    Certain hospitals will hire you in the NICU as a NP, if their contract does not specify that you need a NNP vs PNP certification. Check with the hospital that you are planning on working in. Sometimes exceptions are made.

    Good luck.
  8. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from nytnrs
    I am a PNP and work as a RN in a NICU. I wanted to transition into a NNP position but was told that I needed to have the NNP certification to function as a NNP- thus am in school again. I will have 2 MSN degrees, 2 certifications.

    Certain hospitals will hire you in the NICU as a NP, if their contract does not specify that you need a NNP vs PNP certification. Check with the hospital that you are planning on working in. Sometimes exceptions are made.

    Good luck.
    I can see where they wouldn't let e PNP work in an acute care setting, b/c aren't PNP's trained to work in the primary care setting only? Can a PNP work in the hospital? If so, then why are there Acute Care PNP programs?

    I just don't understand why there are all these different specialties, it just doesn't make sense. If a PNP can work in the hospital, then can an Acute Care PNP work in primary care?
  9. by   nytnrs
    There are acute care PNP's that work in the hospital setting- in the PICU, ER, and other subspeciatly areas. There are also primary care PNP's that work in the hospital setting. There is a difference in the training and education that the primary care vs. acute care specialties receive. Most primary care PNP's work in the outpatient arena; however some also function as hospitalists.

    Sometimes the job descriptions don't specify- a NP is a NP. I'm just saying sometimes you have to do as I am doing and get another certification (because my employer requires it).

    It can be confusing.
  10. by   jeepgirl
    There are two types of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners....


    Primary Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioners...
    Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioners...

    The Primary Care PNP's are the ones you usually see in an outpatient setting or in general hospital areas... they deal with less critical diseases in a well defined scope. PNP-PC's are employed in MANY different roles. I've seen them in outpatient, general peds, ER, ONCO, ENT, Endocrine, surgury, ortho... you name it. The PNP-PC is a really general role and I've seen them employed just about everywhere.

    However... an acute care PNP's role is different. While they have to have a basic knowledge of growth and development, they are geared towards caring for the child in a crisis setting. PICU. ONCO. ER. Trauma. The acute care PNP works with critically ill children who require advanced measures to support life. PNP-AC's do advanced procedures such as LP's, shunt taps, etc...
  11. by   jeepgirl
    Quote from anpfnpgnp
    i can see where they wouldn't let e pnp work in an acute care setting, b/c aren't pnp's trained to work in the primary care setting only? no. pnp-pc can work in primary care, speciality, or the hospital.
    can a pnp work in the hospital? yes.
    if so, then why are there acute care pnp programs? there is a need for specializion re: care for the critically ill child. onco, picu, etc. pnp-ac's fill this need. an acute care pnp works with children who have a very high level of acuity. we're talking lp's, possibly inserting chest tubes, doing bone marrow aspirations, etc. a primary care np doesn't have training on this.
    i just don't understand why there are all these different specialties, it just doesn't make sense. if a pnp can work in the hospital, then can an acute care pnp work in primary care? i honestly have not seen a pnp-ac work in a primary care setting. their training is more focused on the care of the critically ill child. however, dual certification for both primary care and acute care is becoming more and more common though in the acute care programs.
    i answered your questions above!!

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