ANCC to retire most popular, and eventually all, NP roles. - page 8

I just received an official notice from ANCC that my credential will be “retired.” My credential is “Adult Nurse Practitioner,” but other credentials on the chopping block are ACNP, Adult and Child... Read More

  1. Visit  NursingGrace profile page
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    Please forgive me if this information has already been disclosed on this thread. I have not been able to find it here or on the ANCC website.

    Does anyone know the absolute last date when the ANP and GNP exams will be offered by ANCC? I e-mailed ANCC several weeks ago and have not gotten a reply.

    A while back, I laid down my NP practice to raise our children and intentionally allowed both certifications to lapse. I am now ready to pick things up again, which would include re-taking the ANP and GNP exams to re-certify. I am pursuing our state's comprehensive NP refresher program, but the upcoming retirement of my NP certification exams is causing me angst.

    Thank you.
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  3. Visit  CCRNDiva profile page
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    To my knowledge, an exact date has not been provided.

    By the way, I had a chance to talk with some of my classmates during class last week and I was surprised to find that no one else was aware of the certification changes or the Consensus Model. I am truly disappointed that none of our educators or program directors are addressing this with us. I only obtained information about it after directly emailing my program director. Of course, nothing is in writing or formally provided. These schools should be discussing these changes with us. This is very frustrating.
  4. Visit  juan de la cruz profile page
    1
    ANCC does not have an exact date as to when the last ANP-BC, ACNP-BC, and GNP-BC exams are to be offered other than saying that the eaxms won't be offered after 2104. AACN, however, stated that the last ACNPC exam will be offered on December 31, 2014.

    All ANCC and AACN certified NP's received a letter regarding these changes so there's no excuse for faculty members who are practicing NP's to not know about it. It's just sad that such a major shake down is happening and no game plan is in place and it's creating so much frustration from everyone affected.

    It sounds like we can all blame ABNS (American Board of Nursing Specialties) for not allowing the grandfathering of previously certified nurses to the new credentialing letters. This group accredits our nursing specialty boards (such as ANCC and AACN). They're the ones that allowed the creation of this alphabet soup of nursing letters (CEN, CCRN, CNOR, CRRN, etc).

    I also wish we could just follow the physician's way of licensure where they start with the MD or DO title and board certification after residency and fellowship is not even included in the letters after their name. They don't worry about such nonesense in their practice.
    Last edit by juan de la cruz on Apr 14, '12
    CCRNDiva likes this.
  5. Visit  Tinabeanrn profile page
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    Could not have said it better Reeya!
  6. Visit  Puppylv profile page
    2
    I will be starting an Acute Care NP program in the fall at MGH, and they sent an email out to us earlier this year saying the curriculum would be changing. They also informed us that our new specialty will be Adult-Gerontology Acute Care NP. It makes me feel better that the program seems to be on top of the new changes, as I didn't really understand the details regarding the consensus model until reading the posts here.
    CCRNDiva and Tinabeanrn like this.
  7. Visit  CCRNDiva profile page
    2
    It's good to hear that some programs are being proactive and forthcoming about these changes. I spoke with a friend at another program and she told me that her program directors have yet to address these changes with them either. I find it very unprofessional and I'm starting to think it is all about $$. Think about it, would you enroll in a program or stay in a program that may not meet the requirements for the new certification? I know that I would not have signed on to pay $45,000 for a degree that may or may not enable me to take the current certification exam upon graduation.

    I think these program directors are reluctant to be forthcoming because they want to protect their bottom line. I think it is dispicable and unethical. They know that there has been a huge rush to apply to these programs due to the economy and all of the misinformation related to the DNP in 2015 "mandate" but instead of informing students of these changes, they would rather leave us in the dark. They should be ashamed of themselves.
    brendajb and Tinabeanrn like this.
  8. Visit  NursingGrace profile page
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    Thank you for sharing your knowledge about the dates of the last NP certification exams.
    Recently and historically, it has been difficult (impossible) to get ANCC to respond to my communication. Do you (or others) have any suggestions for how to get them to respond?
  9. Visit  moonischasingme1 profile page
    0
    As an update, wanted to inform those following this that some schools are taking notice--mine specifically has overhauled and changed the curriculum to meet the new requirements. They've gone as far as eliminating courses and adding new ones. Our fall semester registration is currently on hold while they get everything ready. We've had "town hall" meetings to discuss the changes and how it will affect students.
    This is from USF. Hope this helps.
  10. Visit  sprinklez profile page
    0
    does anyone know if the change in credentialing can affect the ability to move out of state? as I understand it, NP credentialing is a state by state basis. So if I get grandfathered in as an adult PMHNP and never let my license lapse, and I want to move to a different state, will my license not be recognized? What are your experiences in changing states?
  11. Visit  elkpark profile page
    0
    Quote from sprinklez
    does anyone know if the change in credentialing can affect the ability to move out of state? as I understand it, NP credentialing is a state by state basis. So if I get grandfathered in as an adult PMHNP and never let my license lapse, and I want to move to a different state, will my license not be recognized? What are your experiences in changing states?
    No one really knows yet what's going to happen with this, but that is what happened to the "certificate NPs" (those educated in non-degree certificate programs, which was the standard for years) when the MSN became the standard entry level for new applicants -- they were supposedly "grandfathered in" and could continue to practice as NPs in their current state(s), but they couldn't get licensed in a new state, because they didn't meet the current educational requirements for liensure. That's one of the several reasons so many of us are upset about this. (Of course, educational level and certification are two different matters -- no one knows yet whether states will take the same position on national certifications that are active but "retired.")


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