Sorry Nurse Recruiters/Nurse Managers! - page 16

As I receive rejection after rejection for nursing jobs, I feel the need to apologize to nurse recruiters/managers who overlook my BSN because I lack patient care tech experience. I am sorry I could not afford to take a job as... Read More

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    I am so sorry for all you frustration. As a nurse manager myself, I have found that new grads (with or without experience) are the best untapped resource. I have had 2 openings in the past 6 months and have hired new grads with their fresh, shiny new RN license. I have found the new grads to be eager to learn and to please me and the physicians, they study what they need to know on their own time, they are able to be molded into what we need for their position, and they are very reliable and conscientious. I never hear "well, at my last hospital..." or "well, in the last office I worked in..." I realize that with these new grads, the position I have hired them for may be a stepping stone, but if I can given them a good solid start before sending them on, then I'm okay with that. Do know that not all nurse managers overlook the new grads. There are those of us who can't wait to see them coming! Best of luck to you as you continue your search. The right job will find its way to you...I promise.
    bratmobile, Wild Irish LPN, and Altra like this.

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    Quote from Zookeeper44
    Because if you understand how the NCLEX works, people who pass in 75 questions have a higher level of understanding of the content than those who required more questions. It's just one more measure of your level of understanding of at least the nursing theory. It's funny but I have not once heard anyone who passed in 75 say that it didn't mean anything.
    Well, here you go then. I passed the NCLEX in 75 questions in less than an hour. IT DOESN'T MEAN ANYTHING.
    roser13 and Altra like this.
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    Quote from tcvnurse
    Please, no home health without experience. That would be a disaster.
    That's exactly what I was going to say!
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    Hi Robin67.....That is very nice to hear, being that I will be a new grad come June....I can see how us "newbies" would be a good hire....enthusiasm wanting to please will rule the day, gotta love idealistic rookies....any chance you are in Denver?...lol....
    Last edit by Wild Irish LPN on Apr 21, '12 : Reason: address poster
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    Ok I haven't read all 16 pages, but I just wanted to say maybe we should switch places. I worked full time as an LPN during school (and was an LPN before that) and a CNA even before that. I had a 3.0 GPA, not the best, but I did that while holding down a full time job so I'm happy with that. HR loved hearing that, but didn't want to hire me because.....I have an ASN instead of BSN....

    Ironic isn't it?
    bratmobile and Not_A_Hat_Person like this.
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    Robin's points are absolutely true--new grads are often enthusiastic and eager to learn and please. But, some managers don't independently see it that way. When you're job hunting make it a point to project yourself as eager and willing to learn. Without disparaging experienced nurses you can say, "I'm free of preconceived opinions of what is within or outside my job description." The interviewer will get the point.By all means SELL YOURSELF! Make looking for a job a full-time job. Spend as much time and effort as you did preparing fo finals or writing care plans. Another hint: when a hiring manager gets your application or email they very well my notice the time stamp. Send your correspondence at 8AM, not 1AM (it makes you look like you were out partying and /or you slept until afternoon). Sometimes it's the subtle things that matter.
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    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    I passed the NCLEX in 76 questions, took me twenty minutes, ....
    Ok, there's good test takers, and great test takers, but I'm struggling with this one. Are you saying that you took what you could expect to be the most important test of your career and spent only 16 seconds on each question, and did so well you passed in 76 questions? I'm trying to wrap my head around that one...
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    We all have our opinions about where new grads do and don't belong. (My own thought is new grads don't have the experience, training, or understanding to function in L&D--but that's just me, and I don't work or hire L&D staff so my opinion isn't really worth much!) Many nurses believe their own area of expertise is unique and requires more competence, training and experience than new grads have. That is often ego-driven. If you want to work in some specialized area, go ahead and apply. Only the person who is hiring for that position can determine if you're qualified. But, be aware of the likelihood of finding a job where competition is intense, and decide if you want to limit yourself to only that area. If you don't find that coveted, dream position in a year... or two...or more, your nursing degree will become 'stale' and finding any job may become next to impossible.
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    Quote from RNsRWe
    Ok, there's good test takers, and great test takers, but I'm struggling with this one. Are you saying that you took what you could expect to be the most important test of your career and spent only 16 seconds on each question, and did so well you passed in 76 questions? I'm trying to wrap my head around that one...
    It took me 34 minutes for 75 questions. I do not sit and dwell on the questions. I read the question, found the answer moved along. Worked well in school for me. I always always tested fast. I cant think about things too long. When I know the answer, I know it and dont think about what ifs.
    But like others said it doesnt mean anything. whether its every question over 6 hours or how fast others took it you still get the same license.
    DizzyLizzyNurse and bratmobile like this.
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    Quote from RNsRWe
    Ok, there's good test takers, and great test takers, but I'm struggling with this one. Are you saying that you took what you could expect to be the most important test of your career and spent only 16 seconds on each question, and did so well you passed in 76 questions? I'm trying to wrap my head around that one...
    75 questions for me, about 20-25 minutes. And that was getting sleepy about halfway through (I can't stand the TOTAL SILENCE that is one of those testing rooms.) I'm also a super fast test taker when it's multiple choice. Eliminate the obviously wrong answers, go with my gut on what remaining is the "best" answer. I prepare well for tests and know that if I don't know the answer when I read the question, I'm not going to magically know if I sit and stare at the question longer. And I've learned, when I spend more time thinking about it, I usually overthink myself right out of the correct answer. I know it or I don't.
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.


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