About productive hours per patient day?

  1. 0 I'm the manager of a 20 bed ortho/neuro unit and a 29 bed medical/surgery unit. My questions is what are the productive hours per patient day alotted to various units/hospitals across the nation. We just had consultants come and evaluate our productivity. They then suggested lowering our productivity based on "national benchmarks" so I was wanting to compare the real world numbers. Gather my ammunition. ANy help would be appreciated.
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  3. Visit  rrroyer profile page

    About rrroyer

    From 'Lake Charles Louisiana'; 48 Years Old; Joined Jul '01; Posts: 8.

    47 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  cdrn1 profile page
    1
    On our med/surg unit we are alotted 6 hours per patient. I just attended an IONE conference and in a discussion about magnet hospitals, the average was around 10.
    senator likes this.
  5. Visit  nursemaa profile page
    0
    I manage a 30 bed medical telemetry unit; our hppd are 7.7
  6. Visit  caregiver11 profile page
    0
    On a 32 bed med/sug tele unit the hppd are 7.0. In contrast on a 40 bed PCU unit the hppd are 8.2
  7. Visit  traumamom2002 profile page
    0
    I came from a community hospital in CA where our 30 bed Med/Surg Unit was 7.3 hppd. I am now in Wy where my 55 bed unit averages about 12.0 and I am shooting for 10.0 Quorum wants us to be at 8.0 I am not sure we'll get there.

    HTH
  8. Visit  nicudirector profile page
    0
    Does anyone know hppd in the NICU area? How can we locate national benchmarks?
  9. Visit  AnneDNP profile page
    0
    Could anyone help me find information regarding Lane Benchmarking? I hear it a lot in regards to HPPD and productivity of nurses, but have not been able to find anything on the web about it. Thanks
  10. Visit  RNPATL profile page
    0
    I run a 40 bed unit (med-surg) and my productive hours are 7.80 ... these hours are good, but they include my hours, education as well as new graduate training. So, if you take away all these expenses each payperiod .... I am probably actually running a productive hours base of 6.8 or less and it is hard to meet patient needs with that!
  11. Visit  SarasotaRN2b profile page
    0
    Can someone elaborate on this topic for a complete novice? What HPPD and how do you come up with a figure of productive time for each patient.

    Thanks in advance.
  12. Visit  RNPATL profile page
    3
    Quote from mccnrs2b
    Can someone elaborate on this topic for a complete novice? What HPPD and how do you come up with a figure of productive time for each patient.

    Thanks in advance.
    Actually, HPPD stands for hours per patient day.

    What this means is the amount of hours permitted or allowed for a nurse to spend with a patient per day (24 hour period). Generally speaking, the HPPD is set by your unit's budget. A nurse manager and the staff nurses are required to work within the confines of these numbers as they render care for the patients. Here is a senario that might help you understand it ....

    An HPPD is calculated by the census. So if your unit has a census of 25 patients, then that number is multipled by the unit's HPPD.

    Census of 25 multipled by the HPPD of 7.00 equals = 175 hours. The 7.00 is the number that is given to you by upper management and the number that most nurse managers fight over with the CNO to increase.

    This means that the nurse manager has 175 hours of nursing time to work with in relationship to staffing the unit. So, If I have 175 hours to work with .... all of my unit's staffing hours must come from this number .... for example:

    Assuming a nurse to patient ratio of 1:6 on days and 1:7 on nights and that we are a general medical-surgical unit ... we would staff as follows for this 24 hour period:

    Days Shift Staffing Hours

    Nurse Managers Hours - 5.73
    Charge Nurse 12 hours
    (The CRN would take 2 patients)
    4 Nurses all 12 hours
    2 CNA - 1 for 12 hrs and 1 for 8 hrs
    1 Secretary - 12 hours

    Total Hours for Days = 92

    Night Shift Staffing Hours

    Charge Nurse 12 hours
    (The CRN would take 5 patients)
    3 Nurses all 12 hours
    1 CNA for 12 hours
    1 Secretary for 12 hours

    Total Hours for Nights = 72

    Total Hours Per Patient Day for this 24 hour period would be: 170 (rounded)

    Sometimes, patient acuity is so high that the nurses can not handle 6 patients on days .... the nurse manager needs to be flexible to staff up if needed to accomodate the needs of the patients. This means that you might go over your allowable hours for the day. However, I usually staff by the pay period .... so, if I am off one day, I try to make it up the other days, if possible .... and always with the help of the nurses.

    Hope this helps a little.
    DCtraumarn, fsutallyrn, and catlover314 like this.
  13. Visit  SarasotaRN2b profile page
    0
    That really helped a lot. May I ask what kind of background that you have...the steps you took to become a manager?

    Quote from RNPATL
    Actually, HPPD stands for hours per patient day.

    What this means is the amount of hours permitted or allowed for a nurse to spend with a patient per day (24 hour period). Generally speaking, the HPPD is set by your unit's budget. A nurse manager and the staff nurses are required to work within the confines of these numbers as they render care for the patients. Here is a senario that might help you understand it ....

    An HPPD is calculated by the census. So if your unit has a census of 25 patients, then that number is multipled by the unit's HPPD.

    Census of 25 multipled by the HPPD of 7.00 equals = 175 hours. The 7.00 is the number that is given to you by upper management and the number that most nurse managers fight over with the CNO to increase.

    This means that the nurse manager has 175 hours of nursing time to work with in relationship to staffing the unit. So, If I have 175 hours to work with .... all of my unit's staffing hours must come from this number .... for example:

    Assuming a nurse to patient ratio of 1:6 on days and 1:7 on nights and that we are a general medical-surgical unit ... we would staff as follows for this 24 hour period:

    Days Shift Staffing Hours

    Nurse Managers Hours - 5.73
    Charge Nurse 12 hours
    (The CRN would take 2 patients)
    4 Nurses all 12 hours
    2 CNA - 1 for 12 hrs and 1 for 8 hrs
    1 Secretary - 12 hours

    Total Hours for Days = 92

    Night Shift Staffing Hours

    Charge Nurse 12 hours
    (The CRN would take 5 patients)
    3 Nurses all 12 hours
    1 CNA for 12 hours
    1 Secretary for 12 hours

    Total Hours for Nights = 72

    Total Hours Per Patient Day for this 24 hour period would be: 170 (rounded)

    Sometimes, patient acuity is so high that the nurses can not handle 6 patients on days .... the nurse manager needs to be flexible to staff up if needed to accomodate the needs of the patients. This means that you might go over your allowable hours for the day. However, I usually staff by the pay period .... so, if I am off one day, I try to make it up the other days, if possible .... and always with the help of the nurses.

    Hope this helps a little.
  14. Visit  AnneDNP profile page
    0
    My understanding is that HPPD only include direct patient care givers. Managers and secretary should not count. They should be part of the "administrative" cost. Do others count non-direct care givers?
  15. Visit  RNPATL profile page
    0
    The hours I am allotted to run my unit(s) include the manager hours as well as the secretary hours. Some facilities differ with this, but mine are included.


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