Wrote up a CNA, but I was the one who got the boot! Wrote up a CNA, but I was the one who got the boot! - pg.3 | allnurses

Wrote up a CNA, but I was the one who got the boot! - page 3

About two weeks ago, I had an unfamiliar CNA on my night shift. She was 'helping out' with a shortage apparently. I am new on the job as well. I had previously been instructed to ''hold accountable'... Read More

  1. Visit  doomsayer profile page
    #26 1
    Quote from MotherRN
    Meanwhile, she actively sabotages me to the DON and unit manager by tattle telling any imagined flaw from my shift (she's 7-3, I'm 3-11 lets also throw in there that an 11-7 shift exists) Basically, I got tired of her dumping her left over work on me so I chose not to do it.
    You chose not to give the needed enemas? Or chose not to do work she left undone?
    I am just asking for clarification because you said you were let go for poor performance.
  2. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    #27 0
    MedChica, thank you for your post. I appreciate you telling your story and letting me know I am not alone in what I have experienced in LTC. I came to a similar conclusion as to the priorites of my shift. I basically decided MY shift work would take priority and I would work on left over dumped stuff based on it's level of necessity. What it life threatening? Could it be done later if need be? Once I did this, I started getting out on time. All the interruptions were a pain. I lost a xanax that fell out of the bubble card because we had too many in there raking back and forth against each other until the backing on one of the bubbles ripped and a pill fell out and was lost. That was when I decided I would no longer take non life threatening emergenies interruptions while I was working with the meds. When I lost that pill, a CNA interrupted me, then a family member called to complain on the phone while I was trying to tape closed the tear in the bubble card. Then pharmacy was at the door. Later that evening, I realized I had taped shut an empty bubble and let the one with the pill in it fall on the floor somewhere and get lost. Ugh! Lesson learned!
  3. Visit  kcmylorn profile page
    #28 0
    SO it's back to the job junt. I'm just wondering if this will be the continual theme to nursing- back stabbing fellow nurses and lazy CNAs.

    Please advise
    !!!
    Yep, that's pretty much how nursing goes. I personaly think nursing school is wasting their time teaching all those nursey things- the only 2 courses they need is sabotage and bullying and lazy CNA's
  4. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    #29 0
    Quote from doomsayer
    You chose not to give the needed enemas? Or chose not to do work she left undone?
    I am just asking for clarification because you said you were let go for poor performance.
    Poor job performance was claimed because that's an easy one with a new nurse. Of course I've made mistakes, I'm new and untrained. Either you're willing to support me while I learn or you aren't. What specific performance it was, I didn't ask. They also said I was disrespectful to a nurse- (questioning orders isn't disrespectful. Being unwilling to blindly agree with the nurse on day shift when you are required to do your own assessment and use your own nursing judgement, to have her angry when your appraisal of a situation differed from hers, isn't disrespect- it's me doing my job.) I already went into that in my original post. And we were alone. So there is no witness to our conversation as claimed. The witness part is just to cover their butts. All this came to a head because of the CNA write up.

    It would be complicated to explain the situation down there but here's a short version. The cart had three regulars on it (remember, I thought I was part time, that's how many hours I had been working). We were all new graduate nurse. We started to get patients who were subacute-PICC's, serious venous ulcers, central lines, multiple co-morbidities etc. The admissions started coming more frequently and sometimes near to shift change or shortly thereafter. The instructions were for the receiving nurse to assess the patient, take report, and write a nurses note, do pain assessment, a physical assessment form, call in report to doctor and generate the MAR. Well, with four available nurses on day shift, if they came in early enough, the MAR could be done from faxed discharge summary from hospital before they arrived, and report taken from hospital as well. Then assessing them and writing the note and the pain paperwork was able to be done within an hour on arrival. Keep in mind, I'm brand new. I'm working evenings, no one is there for me to question about how to fill out paperwork. But, I did my share of assessments. What started to happen was that the day nurse was getting overtime, so they literally would dump an unknown patient on me at shift change whom I hadn't received, did know when or how they got there (so how am I to write a proper note?) and often didn't receive the report on them. This one resident was so confused he couldn't help me in anyway fill in the blanks either. So, my performance on paperwork under conditions like this would be reported as poor job performance and they would be unhappy when I came back in.I never received any write ups however. BUt my performance wasn't any worse than at least one other nurse on that cart. Remember my favorite nurse had a four month head start and administrative staff to bounce ideas off of. There is no one on my shift. WHen I couldn't finish all the left over paperwork and it started to pile up, they were more and more unhappy. But, I had to give my meds, do my treatments, answer my call bell lights, do my charting, and get off that clock. It got so bad on our cart that no one was completing their charting and everyone had overtime. Treatments weren't always getting done because time ran out. And at one point we had four files of unfinished charts pilled up on the nurses station. The night shift didn't touch em and the three new grads couldn't get them done right and run our shifts. SO, that generate a nurses meeting last week. We were told to GET oFF THE CLOCK=PERIOD. Luckily the administrative nurses finally finished off the charts, but were unhappy about it. And, the admissions slowed down so we were back to running our shifts. But, yet, I still got left over work from my favorite day shift nurse. And I apparently was the only one held accountable for the total mess on that cart. Completely inappropriate, untrue and unfair.

    The enemas- I gave one because there was only one bottle in stock in the med room anyway-shocker! I had never given one before or dealt with the bowel report, maybe I didn't write it in the proper place. I believe I put it on her medicare sheet. One other resident has dementia and is ambultory and claimed he had a bowel movement. Usually that is documented by the CNA that reported to me, so hopefully she did. With the third one, I don't really remember what happen with that, but I didn't have another enema anyway so my hands were tied. I passed it on in report to 11-7 shift.

    The lab that didn't get called in for her that she had to handle in the morning, that was the shift before. Once they told this kid to get off the clock at the end of her shift, instead of interpreting that to mean she needed to learn how to do her job within her shift time and go on home on time, she didnt speed up (she's been there six months now and should be able to do this quicker and she's full time), she just took it as a liberty that she could just clock out and leave it dumped on me. Then complain when she saw it in the morning again. I prioritized my patients needs on my shift over her unfinished paperwork. I did what I could with it, I always tried, but when it started to impact my ability to finish my treatments and they yelled at me, I had no choice but to put it on the back burner and do direct patient care first.

    I think it's pretty obvious what was going on down there was an impossible situation to be in as anew grad, maybe as any kind of nurse. Maybe if she were able to complete the administrative paperwork on her shift, then all the shifts would stop backing up. At some point I think management will have to say you have been here long enough to have speed up by now to this kid. She tries to be a thorough nurse, but she spends too much time giving report (I finally had to tell her just give me the abnormals and situations I needed to address) there are 19 people I hear report on!

    Anyhow, it was definitely an experience. And, I learned many things from it. Still not sure if it's possible to survive an active sabatour who has the ear of management. Again, thanks for the interest in the situation. As I write this, I think, "Wow that place is screwed up! And I am the lucky one to get out with when I did." Just wish the job market was better!
  5. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    #30 0
    Kcmylorn, I have to agree that what they were teaching in my program certainly helped me pass that NCLEX on the first time, but hasn't done too much to help me or my favorite nurse (and former classmate) to be market-ready, competent nurses. I just don't get why people have to be so ugly to one another. You take it and take it, knowing that when that day comes that you assert yourself its going be an issue, and then that day finally comes, and look what you get for your trouble. You know, I wasn't even given the courtesy of hearing my side of the situation before a decision to let me go was made. When they called me on the phone and told me, I just told them they didn't need to say any more and said goodbye and hung up.

    Thank God I am currently in school working on the prereqs for my BSN. I wil be starting that with a state university in the Fall of 2013. Thank God I didn't drop my Bio class when they were pressuring me about hours at work.
  6. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    #31 0
    BTW- we were classmates, but it was a large program and I never met her while in school. She's my son's age. It's a shame that we couldn't have been more of a support to one another. It was the last thing I expected when I took the job. I was glad a classmate was there because I thought we could look out for one another. Boy was I wrong!
  7. Visit  amygarside profile page
    #32 1
    I am sorry about your situation, unfortunately there will be these kinds of situations wherever you will be. Although there are also places wherein you may want to enjoy staying with them. So I suggest is find a new job that will not aggravate you much.
  8. Visit  MissDardenRN profile page
    #33 3
    It is the joy of working with women.... Best advice; work for a facility with multiple floor so in the case that you don't get along with people on one floor you can transfer to another.
  9. Visit  rn2be73 profile page
    #34 1
    i am an aide...worked in ltc for two years....will NEVER do it again!!! Just because of the "politics" involved. As one other person posted...that is what happens when you work in a field that is mostly women...worked in manufacturing on a team with 9 men and myself....never had any problems, if they didnt like something you said or did, they told you about it...simple
  10. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    #35 0
    Yes, I found working with the male nurses a lot easier. We just backed each other up and kept it light. What a pleasure to have a partner on your side!
  11. Visit  nurseaig profile page
    #36 0
    I am very sorry for what happened to you. Sometimes you just got to keep your mouth shut and do what u have to do. I realize long time ago that ultimately the patients are entrusted to us by doctors. I have never heard a doctor walking on to the unit and asking a CNA how the patient is doing today and when was the last time you give s/he pain medication. Whatever happens to those patients are our responsibilities and not the CNA's. When you are new to a unit you really don't know who knows who. This is my opinion. I would of answered the call bell because 9 out of 10 the CNA would come and tell me that the patient needs the nurse.
  12. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    #37 0
    Quote from nurseaig
    I am very sorry for what happened to you. Sometimes you just got to keep your mouth shut and do what u have to do. I realize long time ago that ultimately the patients are entrusted to us by doctors. I have never heard a doctor walking on to the unit and asking a CNA how the patient is doing today and when was the last time you give s/he pain medication. Whatever happens to those patients are our responsibilities and not the CNA's. When you are new to a unit you really don't know who knows who. This is my opinion. I would of answered the call bell because 9 out of 10 the CNA would come and tell me that the patient needs the nurse.
    Thank you for your post. In our facility, when the bell goes off, the resident want to use the bathroom or be put to bed. It's rarely a nursing issue. It's a time management issue. If do all those things, I can't get the meds passed and the treatments done-my ration was 19 rehab patients to one nurse and I also was expected to respond to the lights of the other 25 residents as well. I did answer lights. I did what I could. I did toilet people and put some to bed as well. There just aren't enought hours in the shift to do this multiple times on a shift. Just not possible.
  13. Visit  Elladora profile page
    #38 0
    Quote from MotherRN
    Basically, I got tired of her dumping her left over work on me so I chose not to do it.

    We didn't have 'words' but I did question her when she made the statement "I put Ms So n So on Sudafed". I asked her, "You put her on Sudafed? Or, you called the doctor and she put her on Sudafed?"
    The first one would be grounds for dismissal where I work. The second one would just annoy me.

    Move on. Sounds like that job wasn't a great fit for you anyway.

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