Work situation, upset, opinions needed - page 4

by beeble

5,337 Views | 39 Comments

Hi! I currently work in critical care, on this unit since last fall. There is a lot to learn. I worked last night. There is an aide who has worked there for 30 or so years. He is very set in his ways, and for example,... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from plaid nurse
    When a patient is desatting your own adrenaline is rushing. You aren't in a relaxed state of mind for thinking through responses. Anyone who works hands on patient care or with basic knowledge of biology knows this. It's your own sympathetic response. You naturally feel sympathy for another human being who is in crisis. When you write the NCLEX, you are asked to choose the MOST CORRECT answer. There can be more than one that is right, but one is more so, in that moment. The tank was a POTENTIAL safety risk. The patient's condition was an ACTUAL safety risk. First things first. Of course there are better ways to store the tank and you know that now. You can analyze "until the cows come home" but truth is, your co-worker gave you a message that said "I am the most important person in this room". You say that many people in this work environment are aware of his attitude and behaviour. I think this workplace may have greater issues.
    Still....I have been coding people for a long time and it is not an excuse to be rude. I'm not saying at some accident scene someone would be directly obtunded and interfering and they will definitely know I am not pleased and become very clear what my expectations are........but I am not rude.

    Please and Thank You go a long way. Before you panic and shout take your own pulse first.
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    Quote from Cleopf01
    Good point. I agree with you. I suppose I just got caught up with what in my head became an "either - or" situation---making the CNA feel important vs. saving a life. :spin: And it's not, you can be respectful, while still making it about the patient.
    Well said.
    wooh and Cleopf01 like this.
  3. 0
    Quote from plaidnurse
    When a patient is de-satting your own adrenaline is rushing. You aren't in a relaxed state of mind for thinking through responses. Anyone who works hands on patient care or with basic knowledge of biology knows this. It's your own sympathetic response. You naturally feel sympathy for another human being who is in crisis. When you write the NCLEX, you are asked to choose the MOST CORRECT answer. There can be more than one that is right, but one is more so, in that moment. The tank was a POTENTIAL safety risk. The patient's condition was an ACTUAL safety risk. First things first. Of course there are better ways to store the tank and you know that now. You can analyze "until the cows come home" but truth is, your co-worker gave you a message that said "I am the most important person in this room". You say that many people in this work environment are aware of his attitude and behaviour. I think this workplace may have greater issues.
    Absolutely the most correct response to this post!
    Of course she was fired up on adrenaline.

    Simply not able to react " politically correct".. when being badgered over bs by an aid!
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    Exactly. A tank falling on the OP's foot is going to bring her patient care efforts to a screeching halt as well!
    wooh likes this.
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    Quote from Esme12
    Still....I have been coding people for a long time and it is not an excuse to be rude. I'm not saying at some accident scene someone would be directly obtunded and interfering and they will definitely know I am not pleased and become very clear what my expectations are........but I am not rude.

    Please and Thank You go a long way. Before you panic and shout take your own pulse first.
    I could not agree more Esme! I think this whole situation really breaks down to how we communicate with other people in our workplace.

    I understand that the OP was responding to a critical situation with her patient and so that can be very nerve-racking experience, especially for a new nurse, but I think it could have been handled better. I also understand that the way the CNA approached the situation was wrong and both the OP and the CNA need to discuss what happened and how to avoid it from happening again. On a side note, I did notice that throughout the OP's first post she included a few details that give me the impression that she has probably never liked this CNA or at least thought very little of him and perhaps that has come across to the people she works with as well.

    Quote from beeble
    There is an aide who has worked there for 30 or so years. He is very set in his ways, and for example, starts his day at 0630 (no one does that anymore) and punches out at 1500. Takes his lunch at 1100, NO MATTER WHAT. Will get frustrated if you bring fresh towels in the room for a clean up "Why are you doing that, there are towels in the drawer" (in the room)). I know several of the longer term staff roll their eyes when speaking of him.
    And the OP goes on to say...

    Quote from beeble
    Appreciate your response. Cant deal with exchange like that when patient is actively crumping. I was the only one there for my patient and had to figure out what I should do and do it, not deal with this aide, seconds count. Exchange was for me to get him out of my focus so I could stay focused on pt., which didnt work, obviously. Slamming things is NEVER acceptable. I did say to him I would address this later, which he did not accept. I was concerned about my patient at that time, not his idiosynchasies.
    After reading this it gives me the strong impression that you think very little of CNAs. Perhaps that is just how you come across in your posts and that doesn't represent how you feel but your writing does give that impression. The fact of the matter is that whether your in a Code Blue situation or not, everyone needs to treat others with a certain level of basic human respect. When the OP said,

    Quote from beeble
    "I can't talk to you right now I am dealing with this situation"
    That comes across as "I don't care what your saying. I'm too busy to deal with you." But if you had said "Would you mind moving it for me? I've got my hands full." it would have let the CNA know (in fewer words) that you were busy while acknowledging his concern and not dismissing him.

    To the OP, I would suggest you speak with the CNA and discuss what happened and how to avoid it again. I would apologize that the situation got to the point that it did (not saying that you were wrong, just that your sorry it got to the point that it did) and see if there is anything you can do to improve the communication between you both. If you leave it up to your manager to deal with it will come across as you are not mature enough to deal with conflict resolution on your own.

    !Chris
    Last edit by cjcsoon2brn on Jun 15, '12
    imintrouble and wooh like this.
  6. 2
    Early in my nursing career I went through an experience simular to yours, I still get upset when I think of this particular aid. He went out of his way making it difficult for others and he seemed to enjoy getting to me. I needed to hang a Procain Drip for a Patient with a HR of 170, The aid wanted me to help him move some beds, I told him I couldn't and probably in a rude way because of my resentments and being in a stressful situation. I argued with him in front of others, still thinking I was right because I was the nurse in a emergency situation and his concerns were of no importance as to mine. But the fact is I was in the wrong, yes I did get the drip up and the Patient responded well, but I didn't handel my situation in a professional manner, there is always more expected from the professional then then the ancilary staff. My self righteous anger and my excitability made a already stressful situation worse and it was my responsabilty to remain calm and focused and keep others around me calm and focused. Look I know its easier said then done, but I have seen others do it and decided I wanted to be more like them and learned allot from this experience. Again this dosen't make the aid right, and those issues can be dealt with in a more proper forum, and not in front of others during a Er situation. Its what makes our job so easy!!LOL
    imintrouble and wooh like this.
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    Quote from sungar
    i've been a critical care nurse for 15 of my 17 year career and while having an o2 tank sitting propped against the wall is wrong it sounds like you were in the middle of getting the patient situated and were going to take it out as soon as you left the room. he got into a resp. crisis and you had to tend to your patient first. if this cna was a good cna he would have kept his big mouth shut and helped you seeing that you had more important things to tend to at that moment! sounds like he has some insecurity issues. it would be a good idea to go to him and tell him that the next time he sees a patient in a crisis situation to do a better job at helping you out and you do not need his badgering while tending to a critically ill patient. all the other comments on here that are so worried about getting an o2 tank out of the room are obviously not bedside nurses or have not worked in critical care where you have these crisis situations.
    i've been in critical care twice as long as you. yes, patient care is a priority, but an oxygen tank propped up against the wall is a lethal hazard. if it got knocked over and the valve broke, it could suddenly become a 20 pound airborne missile taking out everyone and everything in it's path. no one in the area would be safe, not even those outside that room. securing the oxygen tank was a priority -- the op could easily have asked the cna to take care of it right then and there.
    Pepper The Cat, wooh, and Purple_Scrubs like this.
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    Quote from colleenrn2b
    exactly. a tank falling on the op's foot is going to bring her patient care efforts to a screeching halt as well!
    a falling oxygen tank doesn't have to land on someone's foot to be a bad thing. an o2 tank with a broken valve can go airborne -- right through windows, walls and lead shielded doors. imagine what it would do to a person in it's way.
    Pepper The Cat and wooh like this.
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    i'm unpleasantly surprised by how many posters insist that the cna needs to be "put in his place" and who've made disparaging comments about "bullying." the bullying behavior in that exchange came as much from the op as it did from the cna she was addressing. the op made it clear that she was not really listening to the cna and didn't value his input, and from the other comments she's made it seems that she doesn't really like or value the cna himself. he probably gets that. respectful behavior in the workplace is a two way street.
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    Quote from ruby vee
    i'm unpleasantly surprised by how many posters insist that the cna needs to be "put in his place" and who've made disparaging comments about "bullying." the bullying behavior in that exchange came as much from the op as it did from the cna she was addressing. the op made it clear that she was not really listening to the cna and didn't value his input, and from the other comments she's made it seems that she doesn't really like or value the cna himself. he probably gets that. respectful behavior in the workplace is a two way street.
    i too was uncomfortable with the term "put in his place". also calling the cna a "bully" didn't strike me as accurate either.
    what place does the cnas we work with have? are they only there to answer lights and empty bedpans? are they not allowed to think for themselves? can they not determine what's important and what's not? that last may conflict with what a nurse thinks is important, but with respect the two can come to an understanding.
    if putting one in their place is ok, how can we ever be outraged when an md verbally attacks in an emergency situation?
    cjcsoon2brn, wooh, and Ruby Vee like this.


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