Mandatory Meeting With CNO - page 3

by mindlor

So all of us have to go to this mandatory meeting. She wants to find out why my floor cannot keep nurses. I guess she cannot figure out on her own what working constantly short and without techs does to a nurse. I am... Read More


  1. 1
    I think it would be beneficial for some of you to really understand hospitals and how they work. Unions do not improve working conditions but contribute to mediocrity. If someone thinks that its management fault and they want staff to work short, I think not. Much of what is endured in institutions is directed by regulatory bodies and reimbursement. Obama care is only going to add to the burden.
    DSkelton711 likes this.
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    I admitted a fairly high ranking management nurse last week. Honestly, I was frazzled. My pt load was horrible, we had one CNA on the unit, and she was gone to lunch. (CNAs get to take their lunch, the nurses usually don't) The admission was rocky at best. The pt/nurse asked me where the CNAs were. Where was my help? My mouth probably fell open and I stared dumbly.
    This nurse being admitted to our hospital, was part of the decision making process that cut our staff to the bone. She wanted to know where my help was.
    I told here how many pts were on the unit, and the staff scheduled to cover.
    The pt/staff ratio was staggering. Maybe instead of making them work the unit as we do short staffed, we should make their loved ones be the patients when we're short staffed.
    nu rn, twinkletoes53, anotherone, and 3 others like this.
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    Quote from prmenrs
    Joint Commission really out to evaluate facilities on staffing ratios. Goodness knows there's enough "evidence" based research out there to support the concept that correct staffing solves a LOT of outcome issues.
    TJC ain't gonna do anything that actually threatens hospitals. Hospitals will stop using them if they actually started regulating stuff that matters.
    gcupid, Sisyphus, anotherone, and 1 other like this.
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    Quote from twinkletoes53
    In December 2010, I was forced to retire from nursing after 35 years, due to my deteriorating health, and now receive SSDI. I worked in the NICU for 31 years. When I left, we had 85 Level III beds.
    The staffing situation has gotten so much worse since I had to stop working. The month after I left the hospital made drastic cuts in staff hours & benefits. They changed many positions from full to part-time. These changes were presented to the staff in a series of meetings with the Nursing Director, the CEO, and other members of Administration. I watched one of the taped meetings.
    Staff members in the audience looked stunned. They were crying, asking questions, and offering multiple possible alternatives to what they were being told by the CEO. All were denied.
    I think what upset me the most was the way that the information was passed on to staff. Starkly, brutally, with no advance notice. No compassion, no understanding of what these decisions meant to families. That it was putting some employees in an impossible situation. That staff would be forced to quit if they could not adjust their schedules or live on the decreased income. Administration just DID NOT CARE, and it showed.
    Within 6 months, our hospital lost over 200 nurses. The NICU where I had worked initially lost 40 nurses. Many of them were senior nurses. For this note, I will define senior RNs as those with >10 years NICU experience. Over the past 2 years, an additional 15+ senior nurses have resigned
    Many of staff lost in that period were replaced with new graduates with BSN degrees. I don't have anything against working with a new graduate in the NICU. I have done so multiple times over the years, & enjoyed precepting them. I had actually precepted both the current Nursing Director and Clinical Instructor in our NICU. I love to teach. But it got scary when the most senior staff member on the NICU on a particular shift had 2 years experience, & was expected to precept new employees.
    I watch the show "Undercover Boss" every week, and I want someone to work undercover in our NICU, and in various units throughout the hospital, for a week each. I badly want this. Because the hospital is suffering. Staff morale is down. Stress is sky high.
    During an appointment with my Internal Medicine doctor 6 months ago, he stated that he no longer sends patients to our hospital. In his words "________hospital's reputation is in the toilet." It just breaks my heart.
    So I wonder after the senior nurses who were forced into part time status quit, did the new grads get part time status or were they upgraded to full time? I think we know the answer to that already! They just wanted to get rid of their senior staff!
    twinkletoes53, aknottedyarn, and Esme12 like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from twinkletoes53
    In December 2010, I was forced to retire from nursing after 35 years, due to my deteriorating health, and now receive SSDI. I worked in the NICU for 31 years. When I left, we had 85 Level III beds.
    The staffing situation has gotten so much worse since I had to stop working. The month after I left the hospital made drastic cuts in staff hours & benefits. They changed many positions from full to part-time. These changes were presented to the staff in a series of meetings with the Nursing Director, the CEO, and other members of Administration. I watched one of the taped meetings.
    Staff members in the audience looked stunned. They were crying, asking questions, and offering multiple possible alternatives to what they were being told by the CEO. All were denied.
    I think what upset me the most was the way that the information was passed on to staff. Starkly, brutally, with no advance notice. No compassion, no understanding of what these decisions meant to families. That it was putting some employees in an impossible situation. That staff would be forced to quit if they could not adjust their schedules or live on the decreased income. Administration just DID NOT CARE, and it showed.
    Within 6 months, our hospital lost over 200 nurses. The NICU where I had worked initially lost 40 nurses. Many of them were senior nurses. For this note, I will define senior RNs as those with >10 years NICU experience. Over the past 2 years, an additional 15+ senior nurses have resigned
    Many of staff lost in that period were replaced with new graduates with BSN degrees. I don't have anything against working with a new graduate in the NICU. I have done so multiple times over the years, & enjoyed precepting them. I had actually precepted both the current Nursing Director and Clinical Instructor in our NICU. I love to teach. But it got scary when the most senior staff member on the NICU on a particular shift had 2 years experience, & was expected to precept new employees.
    I watch the show "Undercover Boss" every week, and I want someone to work undercover in our NICU, and in various units throughout the hospital, for a week each. I badly want this. Because the hospital is suffering. Staff morale is down. Stress is sky high.
    During an appointment with my Internal Medicine doctor 6 months ago, he stated that he no longer sends patients to our hospital. In his words "________hospital's reputation is in the toilet." It just breaks my heart.
    I am there with you having to leave becasue of health.....I have mantioned this before but you will NEVER see a hospital CEO on undercover boss...because they simply don't care and aren't interested in anything but the numbers.
    twinkletoes53 likes this.
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    Quote from prmenrs
    Whatever happened to staffing by acuity? There are 'tools' out there to better document how many nursing hours per day your clients need; this provides hard data for the suits to justify hiring more staff.

    Joint Commission really out to evaluate facilities on staffing ratios. Goodness knows there's enough "evidence" based research out there to support the concept that correct staffing solves a LOT of outcome issues.

    Nobody asked me, that's jmo.
    The Joint Commission looks at compliance with the staffing plan on file......not the patient to nurse ratio. They ensure compliance to state regulations for an acute care facility (which are made by the very executives that cut staffing) which is a financial model not and acuity one and compliance to the facilities staffing pan.....for example: If the staffing plan calls for 6 nurses for 35 patients and they have 5 > a certain percentage that will get them a deficient mark. They don't set staffing levels.

    Facilities can't just stop using The JC per se....there are a few other organizations that do accreditation but the JC are the "gold standard" and if they (the facility) want medicare/medicaid monies the facility must be accredited
    Altra and aknottedyarn like this.


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