Abusive Cna! - page 3

by Louisepug

2,417 Views | 28 Comments

Hi guys. Well, as some of you know, I will be starting nursing school in fall, but for now I am taking pre-req's and am in CNA school every weekend. I love it, and will graduate as a CNA in May. Anyway, I have a... Read More


  1. 0
    While going to nursing school I work weekends in a nursing home. There are only two aides on 3rd shift and we each have our own hall. I needed assistance with a resident so I walk down the other hall to find the other night aide. What I saw disturbed me, but it was only a split second, and I'm not sure exactly what I saw. What happened is I could hear her as I got closer to the room talking just horrible to this lady (who can't hear). I found her tone of voice and nastyness disturbing, but I'm not even sure what she said. As I got close to the room (door wide open), I saw her roughly putting the ladies legs up on the bed (she allready had her in a sitting position), and then and then harshly rolling the lady to her side (like a sac of potatoes someone in an earlier post described). When I spoke to her she acted very startled and worried I may have saw her be rough. This is an aide that has a good reputation, the staff respects, and she helps people. I am confused to what I saw, and I don't know how to go about reporting something when I'm not sure what she said or what I saw. I would hate to report something if I didn't see right or was wrong about. I have reported abuse once before 3 years ago, but that situation was cut and dry. I was in the room with two aides who closed the door and used horrible language and tormented a man with thier words, and I new exactly what happened. This situation I'm talking about now I just don't know. Do I wait and keep a watch on this person or do I go ahead and talk to someone? Help me put this situation in perspective. :uhoh21:
    The other thing I would like to mention is in this facility thier is a different aide who was abusing a resident and all they did was move her to a different hall and said she can't work down that hall anymore. Another disturbing situation (the nurse told me about) was a new male employee got fired from his old job of suspected sexual abuse of a resident. How alarming! If I did see abuse I feel like nothing would be done about it.
  2. 0
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    You call the state ombudsman. NOW.
    DITTO!!!!! Do not allow this to continue any longer. If it is found out that you knew of this and did not report it, that can affect you becoming a CNA, and maybe even a nurse. Remember, being there and not stopping it, makes a person just as guilty, in the eyes of the law, as the person who is actually doing the abusing. Do not let this happen to you!!!
  3. 0
    Quote from graduatemay2004
    I am confused to what I saw, and I don't know how to go about reporting something when I'm not sure what she said or what I saw. I would hate to report something if I didn't see right or was wrong about. I have reported abuse once before 3 years ago, but that situation was cut and dry. I was in the room with two aides who closed the door and used horrible language and tormented a man with thier words, and I new exactly what happened. This situation I'm talking about now I just don't know
    If you are uncertain what you saw, you are not in the best position to make a report against this person at this time. Do you use a notebook when you take report prior to your shift, or to jot patient information to pass on to the nurse during your shift? If you remember the date, time, patient, etc., you can document what you think you saw this time (like a late entry), and then try to watch and document (discreetly) any similar occurrences that you may encounter in the future. I used to use a small spiral notebook to capture information for charting purposes when I worked on the floor. It fit in my labcoat pocket. If you did report the other CNA, and it turned into a legal issue, you wouldn't want your assertions to be framed with statements like, " I am confused to what I saw, I'm not sure what she said or what I saw, I just don't know." An attorney would destroy testimony that was laced with those phrases, and very likely, if the nursing administration where you work were to seriously consider discipline or termination of this individual, they would not consider it when you expressed uncertainty about what you saw or heard - particularly if the other CNA is respected. Just my $0.02 . . .
  4. 0
    God, hearing all of this is so terrifying. I hate to think about all of the elderly abuse that is going on in America. I can only hope we all can make a difference and try to change this. It is so sad.
  5. 0
    Quote from my2sons
    This is elder abuse, and you are required by law to report it. I would report it to your instructor first,who will be able to direct you through the proper channels. Since the CNA was so blatantly inappropriate in front of a student makes me sick to wonder what kind of behavior that this CNA exhibits when there aren't other people in the room. :angryfire Please be a good advocate for this patient, it is a serious problem.
    ------------------------------------------------------
    What I found out is that if you report abuse against a
    staff member who is well liked they will cover it up for her
    and blame the person reporting.
    If the person being turned in is someone they don't like they will obscure any facts
    that proove them not guilty and will lie about their attitude
    to get rid of them.
    They will also deny them the courtesy
    of a conference with the DoN when they know there are
    distortions in the facts. That way the nurse in question
    never has a chance to clear up the, "misunderstanding"
    between herself and other staff members.
  6. 0
    My unit had an interesting problem - an RN who was accused by a patient of punching her. The patient is question was a trached ICU patient, with a history of drug addiction and just a foul personality. She really might be one to drive you to drink. She claimed this nurse hit her, and an aide backed this up with "I saw him being rough with her." This nurse was already on the poop list since he took horrible personal care of patients (big priority in ICU), he'd claim he bathed and they still smelled, he had a thing about fat people and didn't mind expressing it. His charting was abominable and in a critical situation, he was a mess - he couldn't act quickly, didn't know what to do, and would yell at anyone who tried to help. All this after receiving a 6-month orientation to ICU, and he worked there another year or so before the incident.

    Management fired him that day, with no investigation. This was about eighteen months after we'd unionized, and you can't fire someone like that in a union facility. So he filed a grievance and received his job with back pay, but left after a few months for a position away from bedside nursing.

    Did he really hit the patient? He had poor emotional control sometimes, but I genuinely liked him as a person (not as a nurse) and I still can't see him hitting a patient with a closed fist. I could see him yelling at her or being rough. I'm glad he no longer works with us, because he was an abysmal critical care nurse, but I wish we hadn't had to drag his name through the mud to do it. I just don't know who was right or wrong.

    Anyway, point being that I've been in one position where a nurse was fired summarily, but it backfired in management's faces. The legalities do force them to keep a lousy employee around until something is proven.
  7. 0
    Protection of Persons in Care Act governs care in Nursing Homes in Alberta. There is a 1800 number you can call without giving your name.

    I saw it used against two staff members who richly deserved it and also saw staff threatened by it. Who is to describe what a tone of voice is? Are you really shouting at or is the resident hard of hearing?

    I think that piece of legislation was badly slanted in favour of the resident and their families and totally hostile to staff.

    Facilities have signs saying "We do not tolerate abuse of our staff or or residents" and other platitudes. BUT they are very reluctant to stop abuse of staff. I know of one pregnant CNA who lost her baby when kicked by an elderly resident. Nothing was done because "he has dementia and isnt responsible" Another was attacked by a drunk resident with his cane and walker, again nothing was done because "we know he's an alcoholic, how did you approach him?" It seems staff are always wrong and got themselves abused. When one lpn tried to have assault charges laid she was told go ahead and be dismissed. The union intervened pretty fast. And most cops I know have no problem with it.

    The facilities just dont want trouble and staff are replacable.
  8. 0
    Quote from Louisepug
    Hi guys.
    Well, as some of you know, I will be starting nursing school in fall, but for now I am taking pre-req's and am in CNA school every weekend. I love it, and will graduate as a CNA in May. Anyway, I have a question/concern. My class has been doing clinicals in the ECU of a certain hospital every Sunday thus far. Now, I personally really enjoy working with the elderly, but am aware it's not for everyone. Apparently though, it is certainly not for the staffed CNA that already works on the floor. Granted, I know I am a "visitor" in her hospital when I do my clinicals, but what my fellow students and I have witnessed is abuse in my opinion. This past sunday, not only did this CNA snap at my classmates and me a few dozen times for no reason, but more importantly she was so mean to the patients. There was this very ill elderly woman on an NG tube, catheter, about 80 lbs. and had muscles that were pretty much atrophied in the fetal position. Everytime someone would try and bathe her she would scream. I know that this must be difficult to hear each day, but the CNA on the floor came into the patients room to "help" my classmate with her care and the lady started to scream. The CNA said very angrily, "If she's gonna do that, just let her lie there!" She also threw the patients around very roughly like a sack of potatos and cussed profanely in front of them about their "stool" being everywhere! It was horrifying to see, and I know from stories on here that this stuff occurs all over. What I don't understand is, if someone like this woman obviously hates what she is doing, why not quit and work as a waitress or something? It surely pays better. Whay would she continue to stay and abuse patients? It's just really heart-wrenching to see and makes me really sad. I believe my instructer reported her, but I know for a fact that this CNA has been reported before, and she's STILL there! :angryfire What can be done about people like this? How can we save the vaulnerable from abusive people like this?? Sorry if I seem so dramatic, it's just that this is the first,(and I'm sure not last) time that I've witnessed this kind of behavior personally. Thanks for letting me vent. Louisepug
    That stupid CNA needs to get fired. I've been a CNA for 5+ years in acute care and long term and you don't behave unprofessionally like that to the pt's or staff/students. She's either bitter or just showing off being an *** wiper.
  9. 0
    Quote from Fiona59
    Protection of Persons in Care Act governs care in Nursing Homes in Alberta. There is a 1800 number you can call without giving your name.

    I saw it used against two staff members who richly deserved it and also saw staff threatened by it. Who is to describe what a tone of voice is? Are you really shouting at or is the resident hard of hearing?

    I think that piece of legislation was badly slanted in favour of the resident and their families and totally hostile to staff.

    Facilities have signs saying "We do not tolerate abuse of our staff or or residents" and other platitudes. BUT they are very reluctant to stop abuse of staff. I know of one pregnant CNA who lost her baby when kicked by an elderly resident. Nothing was done because "he has dementia and isnt responsible" Another was attacked by a drunk resident with his cane and walker, again nothing was done because "we know he's an alcoholic, how did you approach him?" It seems staff are always wrong and got themselves abused. When one lpn tried to have assault charges laid she was told go ahead and be dismissed. The union intervened pretty fast. And most cops I know have no problem with it.

    The facilities just dont want trouble and staff are replacable.
    -----------------------------------------------
    When you work for any employer you should not ever
    assume that they have your best interest at heart.
    That CNA who lost her baby should
    have filed a lawsuit against that facility. It was
    rude of them to tell her he has dementia like that
    must be an excuse for her baby to die. When you
    hear excuses like these they are a symptom of
    their blatent indifference to their workers.
    I have also been put in situations with
    patients where I was in danger and my co workers
    were furious when I refused to cooperate with them
    and risk getting punched in the face or hurting
    my back or dropping the patient.

    My advice to anyone
    is to have enough self respect NOT to go to work
    if they don't protect your welfare! You can report
    unsafe working conditions to the labor board
    and also know that the patients have the same
    rights and NOT MORE RIGHTS than the rest of us.
    They don't have a right to injure you just because
    they're demented.
    When your co workers refuse to help you with
    an aggressive patient they are broadcasting
    their lack of concern for your safety and dignity.

    I had this experience in a place where they
    claim to be working, "as a team." I was lucky
    not to lose a baby or end up being injured.
    Last edit by AmethystVeralyn on Oct 12, '04


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