Any Neonatoal NP (NNP) at your units? - page 3

Hello everyone - Does any of you have have NNPs work in your unit? If so, what is their job like? Do they enjoy it? Do they get stuck with the night shift? I also heard that some NICUs have... Read More

  1. by   CapeMaui
    That's so exciting!! Good luck and eary congrats! :hatparty:

    Thanks for the insight on the distance learning! I will definitely keep an open mind about it as it will really depend on where my life is 2 years from now.

    I definitely want to go part time as I want to work. You're so right, there is no replacement for actual hands on experience, especially when it comes to babies, IMHO anyway . As for school choice is concerned, although Stony Brook is an awesome school, it's no Duke or Columbia, that's one of the reasons why I'm leaning towards pursuing Columbia. However, there is NO comparison when it comes to the cost! Stony Brook is a 1/3 of the cost! So it'll really depend on where life takes me

    I will definitely keep Duke's info handy and will work with whichever school I get in to see if they will work with me on customizing something. Too bad Duke doesn't have a distance learning program for NNP, or I would definitely consider it, as it'll give me a good excuse to fly down to the nice weather periodically! :chuckle

    I will definitely keep in touch and update where I end up. Email or here?

    Thanks again!!
  2. by   mac23
    You can certainly email me if you'd like. I check here as often as I can so you can catch me around here too. Good thing about most hospitals is that they are willing to pay for your education in exchange for your services post graduation. At Duke after you've worked for them for a year they pay 90% of your tuition in exchange for a year of service for each year they pay for. Not bad considering the $$$$$$ to attend Duke! I understand what you mean about where you end up in life, I never thought I'd be here but I'm a firm believer in thinking Everything will work itself out if you work hard enough even though it might not be what you originally wanted.
    QUOTE=CapeMaui]That's so exciting!! Good luck and eary congrats! :hatparty:

    Thanks for the insight on the distance learning! I will definitely keep an open mind about it as it will really depend on where my life is 2 years from now.

    I definitely want to go part time as I want to work. You're so right, there is no replacement for actual hands on experience, especially when it comes to babies, IMHO anyway . As for school choice is concerned, although Stony Brook is an awesome school, it's no Duke or Columbia, that's one of the reasons why I'm leaning towards pursuing Columbia. However, there is NO comparison when it comes to the cost! Stony Brook is a 1/3 of the cost! So it'll really depend on where life takes me

    I will definitely keep Duke's info handy and will work with whichever school I get in to see if they will work with me on customizing something. Too bad Duke doesn't have a distance learning program for NNP, or I would definitely consider it, as it'll give me a good excuse to fly down to the nice weather periodically! :chuckle

    I will definitely keep in touch and update where I end up. Email or here?

    Thanks again!![/QUOTE]
  3. by   CapeMaui
    I know that most hospital will pay for post-grad tuition, I'm hoping to find out more about tuition forgiveness program for the loan from undergrad

    Will definitely email/leave msgs here. Good luck and keep us posted when you take your board!!
  4. by   salvati08
    What is the NNP pay like? Does it pay any different than other np's, thanks!
  5. by   AllyZ
    I work in a large unit where we use NNP's and are also hiring more. They work in close contact with the attending's and fellows in neonatology. They are great to work with and most are former NICU nurses. They work normal hours and do a night on call rotation. I think they are great not only with the patients but also with the families!!







    Quote from CapeMaui
    Hello everyone -

    Does any of you have have NNPs work in your unit? If so, what is their job like? Do they enjoy it? Do they get stuck with the night shift? I also heard that some NICUs have PNP (peds NP) work in their unit, is this true?

    If there are any NNP's or PNPs that work in NICU, I would love to hear from you about your current situation and job outlook.

    Thanks for your help!
  6. by   CapeMaui
    Thanks Ally! That's awesome to know! I am so glad to hear very positive things about NNPs. I am a little worried about the long term viability of the position, but it is my dream job! Thanks again!
  7. by   erilynn17
    CapeMaui, I think we are in the same position! I am also in the Long Island area, and want to be a NNP. I know that I couldn't do the distance program at Stony Brook, although I am currently doing undergrad there. Fortunately, I do have the ability to move around a little, but I am looking for anything basically on the east coast. There aren't very many options though! Columbia is rediculously expensive, and is the only other school close by. I am looking into Penn State, UPenn, Duke, and Northeastern. The other program is these schools are very competitive. Does anybody else know of any good programs??? I'm also looking for anyone's opinion on the differences b/w neonatolgist and NNP. I will be finishing nursing school next year and I am considering med school instead of going on to NNP. Any advice?
  8. by   mac23
    The road to being a neonatologist (MD or DO) is a long one. 4 years undergrad, 4 years medical school, 3-4 years pediatric residency, 3 years as a neonatology fellow. If your heart is truly with being a doctor, then go for it. Take what you need to get into med school now, and keep your grades up. I too once thought about going to med school but then I had my baby and my priorities changed. Only you can decide what's best for you. Visit studentdoctor.com and read about people's experiences with applying to med school (Warning: a lot of them don't think too highly of nurses, but don't let that sway you away from being an NNP). also neonatology.org (look under career information) has a lot of info on neonatology. Last, talk to other NNP's and maybe shadow one or two and talk to them about their experiences. My own experiences (my daughter was a 23 weeker) and being a NICU nurse helped my decision and I don't regret it one bit.



    Quote from erilynn17
    CapeMaui, I think we are in the same position! I am also in the Long Island area, and want to be a NNP. I know that I couldn't do the distance program at Stony Brook, although I am currently doing undergrad there. Fortunately, I do have the ability to move around a little, but I am looking for anything basically on the east coast. There aren't very many options though! Columbia is rediculously expensive, and is the only other school close by. I am looking into Penn State, UPenn, Duke, and Northeastern. The other program is these schools are very competitive. Does anybody else know of any good programs??? I'm also looking for anyone's opinion on the differences b/w neonatolgist and NNP. I will be finishing nursing school next year and I am considering med school instead of going on to NNP. Any advice?
  9. by   CapeMaui
    erilynn17

    First things first, don't worry too much about cost of post-grad education as most hospitals will pay for it when you work for them. Plus, all the schools you've mentioned are probably just expensive as Columbia.

    Just out of curiosity, why couldn't you do the distance learning program at Stony Brook? Also, how do you like SB for their undergrad?

    As for NNP vs. Neonatologist, IMHO, it really depends on what you want out of your career. Like Mac23 has mentioned, it's a long journey to becoming a Neonatologist and you would be responsible for all of the cost. For me, the choice of NNP over Neonatologist is not an easy one. I have a couple of friends who's Dads are Neonatalogists and I shadowed one for a few hours during one of my NICU visits and I LOVE what they do. I have yet to talke to a NNP, but so far, from RNs that I've talked to, the NNPs love their jobs too! Perhaps you should talk to both a Neonatologist and a NNP before deciding on what you want to do.

    Good luck!!
  10. by   erilynn17
    I know that hospitals usually have tuition reimbursement, but I don't know if they pay for it completely. I work at 2 hospitals right now as a pharmacy tech and one of them only gives you $3000 a year if you work full time and $1500 part time. I couldn't do the SB distance program b/c I don't think I would get as much out of it, or really be able to focus and do it. I would rather actually go to classes. I really like SB undergrad though...they have a great reputation, and even though its kinda tough, it makes me feel better that I'm challenging myself. This really is a tough decision b/w NNP and neonatologists...what are some pros and cons you've thought of? I know that I am going to definitely going to become an RN its just a matter of what to do after that. I have been trying to shadow someone but I can't find a hospital that will let me! They basically say that they don't do that. I haven't contacted SB yet but that would probably be my best choice. Feel free to PM me if you can suggest a hospital that you know would do it.
  11. by   CapeMaui
    Quote from erilynn17
    I know that hospitals usually have tuition reimbursement, but I don't know if they pay for it completely. I work at 2 hospitals right now as a pharmacy tech and one of them only gives you $3000 a year if you work full time and $1500 part time. I couldn't do the SB distance program b/c I don't think I would get as much out of it, or really be able to focus and do it. I would rather actually go to classes. I really like SB undergrad though...they have a great reputation, and even though its kinda tough, it makes me feel better that I'm challenging myself. This really is a tough decision b/w NNP and neonatologists...what are some pros and cons you've thought of? I know that I am going to definitely going to become an RN its just a matter of what to do after that. I have been trying to shadow someone but I can't find a hospital that will let me! They basically say that they don't do that. I haven't contacted SB yet but that would probably be my best choice. Feel free to PM me if you can suggest a hospital that you know would do it.
    The tuition reimbursement amount you mentioned sound really low. For example, Montefiore pays for 18 credits a year regardless of cost, NY Presbytarian pays 10,000 a year, and Stamford Hospital (CT) pays 80% of tuition regardless of cost as well. The list goes on. During career fair at my school, most other hospitals, like Mount Sinai, all have decent tuition reimbursement, the lowest that I could remember was 5,000 for the year. I would look into other hospitals if yours doesn't have a great benefit. The way I look at it is that I would be working and only going for NP P/T, so the amount of tuition reimbursement I've come across would cover it, year to year.

    What hospitals have you talked to about shadowing? I didn't actually shadow a Neonatologist or a NNP. I talked to NNPs through friends that know them and Neonatologist when I was shadowing a nurse in the NICU. My advise would be to definitely ck with SB to see if they can hook you up to talk to a NNP and a Neonatologist. Most NNPs are very willing to talk to students. Once you get a dialogue going, see if they'll let you come in and see their day for a couple of hours. I hope this is helpful.

    As for pros vs. cons between NNP and Neo MD (the word's too long to type ), for me, it really was a matter of time and money. From what I can tell, both really enjoy their job (who wouldn't!) and the NNPs are just as independent as the MDs and command just as much respect (I think this comes with experience and the NNP showing they know what they're doing). However, I am married and planning to start a family in 2 years. With that said, have a look at my list:

    Pros for NNP:
    * flexible school schedule
    * less time to achieve
    * less money to achieve
    * ability to continue to work
    * have a family
    * good pay
    * holistic approach!
    * get to work with the babies!

    Cons for NNP:
    * not all hospitals have positions for NNPs
    * not all hospitals are good to NNPs, some have bad working situation, e.g. lack of respect, bad hours, etc.
    * inpatient only (but I think this is changing)

    Pros for MD:
    * get to work with the babies!
    * VERY good pay
    * can work outpatient

    Cons for MD:
    * VERY long schooling, no p/t as far as I know
    * won't really have time to tend to family
    * very expensive to obtain (4 years of med school vs. 2 years NNP, that's f/t)
    * crazy hours during residency, fellowship, etc.

    As I've mentioned above, family is first for me. After seeing the list I've made, it was clear to me that NNP is the way to go, for me. You'll need to make a list for yourself and find out what is important to you. Once you can prioritize and make a list, the decision should be a bit easier.

    Hope this helps. Good luck.

    p.s. thanks for the info on SB undergrad! I'm always interested to see what everyone thinks of NY area schools. I've always heard great things about SB for their other programs, so I was just curious about the nursing

    Best!
  12. by   Gompers
    Quote from erilynn17
    I know that I am going to definitely going to become an RN its just a matter of what to do after that. I have been trying to shadow someone but I can't find a hospital that will let me! They basically say that they don't do that.
    I'm not surprised that more and more hospitals are limiting "shawdow" experiences nowadays. There is such a crack-down on privacy with HIPPA guidelines. If you're in nursing school, you should get at least one day in the NICU (just observation) during your peds or OB clinical rotation.

    You don't have to decide now about NNP or MD, honestly. The best thing is to graduate with your BSN, get your license, and start working in a NICU. Why make such a huge decision now, when you have no experience working in a NICU? Interviewing people is okay, but until you're working there as an RN, you're really not going to know which position suits you better. I'd recommend starting work, and after a year, starting your NNP program - first will be all the general type master's courses, so by the time you're starting the actual NNP hands-on stuff, you'll have probably a good 2 years of NICU experience. Or, if after a year in nursing you decide being an MD is better for you, then you can start medical school. But since you're going for nursing anyway, might as well take that year to soak up the environment!

    Good luck!
  13. by   erilynn17
    This might be sort of random, but while working in a NICU I would want the oportunity to help with deliveries every now and then. I definitely don't want to do OB/GYN, but I think it would be kind of cool to deliver babies sometimes. I heard that NNPs sometimes help out w/difficult deliveries or C sections, and I was wondering if this is true, and also if the neo MD's help out at all. If anyone who works in a NICU can answer this, let me know. Thanks!

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