Does it pay to know spanish?

  1. 0
    Hello Nurses/Nursing Students,

    I have been thinking about learning a second language, Spanish specifically, and I was wondering if it would pay off in my nursing career. I am currently a student at St. Kate's right now getting my ADN. I am looking to improve my attractiveness in the job market and am wondering if this would make a difference. Also, will I make more knowing a second language?

    Thank you!
  2. 9 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Quote from KCRustin
    Hello Nurses/Nursing Students,

    I have been thinking about learning a second language, Spanish specifically, and I was wondering if it would pay off in my nursing career. I am currently a student at St. Kate's right now getting my ADN. I am looking to improve my attractiveness in the job market and am wondering if this would make a difference. Also, will I make more knowing a second language?

    Thank you!
    My two cents, coming from a CNA that's worked med/surg in a hospital for 5 years, is no it will not benefit you that much. I can;t speak from a hiring manager's point of view but I think it would just be a bullet point on your resume. You would never be able to act as your own interpreter whilst dealing with patients on important things like procedures or medications you would still need to call the interpreter. Plus in 5 years working around the suburbs in a few hospitals....I can count on one hand the amount of times SPANISH got in the way. Honestly it's usually the Hmong community.

    Honestly I don't mean this as a dig at all, but if you want something REALLY useful and plan on working in MN....learn Hmong. (I apologize if that is not what their language is called)
  4. 0
    Right now, there is a new JCAHO requirement that anyone who interprets clinical information must be validated in the second language by his or her hospital. I haven't taken it yet, but I don't think that a semester or two of Spanish is going to enable you to pass this type of validation.

    Ultimately, I think it's going to diminish the value of people who speak some Spanish but who aren't either very proficient or fluent. Down here in Texas, I think it's also going to increase the costs of care. We'll likely be calling for an interpreter in many cases where we'd previously utilize an employee who was conversant but not fluent.
  5. 0
    Thank you. I am looking into getting the Rosetta Stone Spanish courses to become fluent and also teach my kids. I have a 2 1/2 year old and a 1 year old that I would like to teach so knowing Spanish would just be a bonus for work. I was hoping it would help in the job search when I am done with school in 2 years.
  6. 0
    I believe a lot depends on the community where you live. If a significant portion of the population speaks only Spanish, then you would find it helpful. However, if you live in a community where few people speak only Spanish ... then you would have little need for it.

    I took 5 years of Spanish in junior high and high school -- and can't speak it at all. I lived in a community where people didn't speak Spanish and never had a chance to hear it spoken regularly or to actually use it. I "lost it" as fast as I learned it.
  7. 0
    Quote from llg
    I believe a lot depends on the community where you live. If a significant portion of the population speaks only Spanish, then you would find it helpful. However, if you live in a community where few people speak only Spanish ... then you would have little need for it.

    I took 5 years of Spanish in junior high and high school -- and can't speak it at all. I lived in a community where people didn't speak Spanish and never had a chance to hear it spoken regularly or to actually use it. I "lost it" as fast as I learned it.
    This is in the minnesota forum for a reason, the OP is probably from MN.

    Your guys' posts "it may be different in different regions" is irrelevant since she posted this in the MN forum. I bet you have a lot more people speaking spanish in TX, JUST SAYING.
  8. 0
    I am an RN and a native speaker of the Spanish language. I don't think the Spanish has given me an advantage to get a job. What seems to matter right now is clinical experience. Just my humble opinion!
  9. 0
    I don't know whether it will help you get a job but it still might be worthwhile. I would think it depends on what type of work environment you are seeking. I work at HCMC and we have a large Spanish speaking patient population. Believe me, I wish every day that I spoke Spanish!
  10. 0
    Not sure if you get paid more for knowing a second language, but I think it does help. I live in Texas and we have a huge Hispanic population here. I have had quite a few patients who spoke only Spanish or knew limited English. Communicating with them was difficult unless family was there to translate for me (we also have employees who act as translators as well). I took 4 years of Spanish in high school and 99% of it went down the drain - now I can only pick up minimal words/phrases.
  11. 0
    I speak spanish and work in an outpatient dialysis clinic. It did not help me get the job, nor do they pay me for it, but I have to say it has been so helpful not to have to wait for an interpreter every time I need to speak to one of my spanish speaking patients! Go for it! It can't hurt!


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