Floor nursing vs ICU nursing - page 5

Do you think ICU nursing is as STRESSFUL (crazy, hectic, etc) as med/surg floor nursing? I realize ICU nursing takes a great deal of knowledge and the patients are more critical, . . . .I need an... Read More

  1. by   dfk
    Quote from smile123
    I was talking about my observations, not statistics. Most people go into nursing because they want to provide care. However, it is a known fact that CRNAs do make good money. Yes, there are more women in general who go into nursing no matter what specialty because that's the makeup of the students right now. I was just talking about how among the male nurses/nursing students I know, there seem to be more men who are gravitating to the ICU/CRNA path now rather than going into general floor nursing. It was my observation, which I stated at the begnning of my post. So please don't start attacking posters; it is not good etiquette. Thanks.
    oh, ok. fair enough re: your observations. last time i checked this was a free forum, giving those of us freedom to express and sound off. sorry if it offended you. my etiquette has never been challenged. i just don't enjoy reading posts with misinformation and the like. again, you as well, are free to post whatever, but like all of us, expect the good and the not so good with any post.
    have a great day !!!
  2. by   anne74
    I really wish someone would have explained to me the real deal of med/surg vs. ICU when I was in nursing school, and trying to figure out where to start my first job. I've been on a med/surg unit for 7 months, and I'm transferring to PACU next week. In med/surg I feel frustrated that you have no time to do what you were taught in nursing school, like critical thinking, care plans, and really studying the pathophys of your patients. In med/surg you're just trying to keep up with constantly changing orders and the paperwork of admits/discharges. The times I've been most satisfied is when I've had patients go bad - of course that's not a good thing, but I feel like I've really helped the patients and learned so much!

    I guess I learned a lot on med/surg - most of all incredible organizational skills - but now I'm ready to bow out. Maybe starting out I would have been overwhelmed by the acuity of patients in ICU (???) But I've hated med/surg so much, I wanted to quit nursing for good- and I would have left if I hadn't gotten a transfer to PACU. It's so frustrating and physically hard on your body! I'm really wondering what will happen to med/surg nursing in the future - we need so many of them, but it's becomming the least desirable place to work for nurses. (And granted, a lot has to do with how the unit is staffed, etc.)

    Nursing instructors need to stop telling students that you NEED to start out in med/surg. I'm so mad I listened to that! People should go to med/surg if that's the type of nursing they want to do. Otherwise, if you try to fit every nurse into being a med/surg nurse, you can get people leaving the profession because it was the wrong fit. I already know of several people who started in med/surg and have quit nursing. Makes me wonder if they started somewhere else, would they have stayed?

    Anyway, I hope I'll like PACU better...
  3. by   Maine Critical Care
    The all time worstdays I have had have been as charge of the ICU. Bar none.
    Any medsurg day was hectic and tiring, but in the ICU, multiple codes, near codes, staffing and revising staffing 5 times for multiple admits of unstable patients, going to rapid response codes, trauma codes, code blues in house!!!

    OY I never had to give upwards of 40 units of blood product to one person out in med surg! (in one shift)

    In ICU last month I had a nearly brain dead 15 year old blow a pupil and go to surgery. On the same day we withdrew care of a 40 year old mom with three little kids (2-4-7) and I had to hold them up to mommy to say good bye. We also had a Jehovah's Witness 2 days post fetal demise from abrubtion of the placenta with a hgb of 3 getting intubated for respiratory failure. Plus we had 7 other critical patients on ventilators and the ED screaming for beds. This all happened on the same day!!
    ICU gets it hands down for the worst days possible.
  4. by   dfk
    Quote from Maine Critical Care
    The all time worstdays I have had have been as charge of the ICU. Bar none.
    Any medsurg day was hectic and tiring, but in the ICU, multiple codes, near codes, staffing and revising staffing 5 times for multiple admits of unstable patients, going to rapid response codes, trauma codes, code blues in house!!!

    OY I never had to give upwards of 40 units of blood product to one person out in med surg! (in one shift)

    In ICU last month I had a nearly brain dead 15 year old blow a pupil and go to surgery. On the same day we withdrew care of a 40 year old mom with three little kids (2-4-7) and I had to hold them up to mommy to say good bye. We also had a Jehovah's Witness 2 days post fetal demise from abrubtion of the placenta with a hgb of 3 getting intubated for respiratory failure. Plus we had 7 other critical patients on ventilators and the ED screaming for beds. This all happened on the same day!!
    ICU gets it hands down for the worst days possible.
    :roll :roll :chuckle

    oh those were the days...
  5. by   teiladay
    Quote from dfk
    ummm, don't think that's accurate.
    first, more men go into critical care, such as ICU and ER, as a general observation, CRNA or not.
    second, if you look at the statistics, there are way more women than men in, and going into, CRNA programs.
    and third, yea, more money, for anyone who enters that field, but it is NOT the major motivating factor for entry. there can be more money made in the same field, and others as well.
    it would be great if people would do a little researching before sounding off about something they are obviously not too aware of.
    You might want to look at those "statistics" again.. when I look at who's generally graduating from CRNA school, the incidence of men are regularly over 50% of the graduating CRNA class. I've been tracking the CRNA school in my area (Gooding) and I think you'll find their numbers reflective of many CRNA schools across the country.
    The bottom line is that less than 10% of nurses are men.. however, a huge congregate of those nurses are CRNAs.. hmmmmm

    CRNA is one field that you're VERY likely to see men. It's might not be politically correct to say that money is the driving factor, but when I look at the highest paying jobs in the medical field (and most technical), I notice the % of men always rise, and this goes for nurses and MD. What gender often makes up the majority of PA graduates?

    Pilots can appreciate this: Every civilian flight physical that I've ever had was conducted by a man. Each of those men were GYN.

    Like it or not (and I'm not trying to be inflammatory) your typical guy isn't biting at the bit to do the more common forms nursing. Poll men coming out of nursing school and see how many are intent on becoming a CRNA and the numbers are MUCH larger than women (per capita). It is also no secret that many nurses intent on being a CRNA keep their intentions under their hat. I did many such medical surveys for an unrelated business.. i found the results not only interesting (from a gender role/sociology-psychology standpoint) but found the results very predictable. The same is true for attorneys but that's another thread and another forum.

    There is a definite correlation between money and CRNA hopefuls (nothing wrong with that). If CRNAs made $40,000 per annum, you'd see a considerably more men using CRNA as just a stepping stone to better their apps for med school. Speaking of which- I think you'll raise an eyebrow at the number of men (compared to women) who, after being a CRNA for several years, take the MCAT with Anesthesiologist as their final destination.

    Rule of thumb: In most professional fields (requiring a masters degree or higher), if you want to see the % of men sharply rise... follow the money.

    Respectfully

    Teila K. Day
  6. by   dfk
    Quote from teiladay
    You might want to look at those "statistics" again.. when I look at who's generally graduating from CRNA school, the incidence of men are regularly over 50% of the graduating CRNA class. I've been tracking the CRNA school in my area (Gooding) and I think you'll find their numbers reflective of many CRNA schools across the country.
    The bottom line is that less than 10% of nurses are men.. however, a huge congregate of those nurses are CRNAs.. hmmmmm

    CRNA is one field that you're VERY likely to see men. It's might not be politically correct to say that money is the driving factor, but when I look at the highest paying jobs in the medical field (and most technical), I notice the % of men always rise, and this goes for nurses and MD. What gender often makes up the majority of PA graduates?

    Pilots can appreciate this: Every civilian flight physical that I've ever had was conducted by a man. Each of those men were GYN.

    Like it or not (and I'm not trying to be inflammatory) your typical guy isn't biting at the bit to do the more common forms nursing. Poll men coming out of nursing school and see how many are intent on becoming a CRNA and the numbers are MUCH larger than women (per capita). It is also no secret that many nurses intent on being a CRNA keep their intentions under their hat. I did many such medical surveys for an unrelated business.. i found the results not only interesting (from a gender role/sociology-psychology standpoint) but found the results very predictable. The same is true for attorneys but that's another thread and another forum.

    There is a definite correlation between money and CRNA hopefuls (nothing wrong with that). If CRNAs made $40,000 per annum, you'd see a considerably more men using CRNA as just a stepping stone to better their apps for med school. Speaking of which- I think you'll raise an eyebrow at the number of men (compared to women) who, after being a CRNA for several years, take the MCAT with Anesthesiologist as their final destination.

    Rule of thumb: In most professional fields (requiring a masters degree or higher), if you want to see the % of men sharply rise... follow the money.

    Respectfully

    Teila K. Day
    hey teila,
    while i don't disagree with much of your post,
    i have to rebut just a tad.
    since i am in the field, and yes, i am male, i have to say:
    according to the AANA, 42% of the 37,000 nurse anesthetists and student nurse anesthetists are male compared to only 8% of nursing as a whole.
    now, that's not to say that it isn't climbing, because it is.
  7. by   ghillbert
    Quote from smile123
    Here's my observation: Most CRNA programs require 2 years of ICU experience. More men attracted to the CRNA program (they can make more money) so they choose the ICU right after graduation for that reason. This is a general observation.
    I doubt that's the reason - in Australia, we don't even have CRNAs, but we still have a higher percentage than average of male RNs in ICU. I think it's because boys like things that go "beep". :chuckle
  8. by   jalainec
    i worked ICU for years with ICU nurses that would refuse to float to the med surg floor. They were scared because they could not monitor their patients as closely as in ICU and scared of having 5 or more pts to care for. When i'm afraid of something I go and do it. That usually makes me not afraid anymore. Med surg nurses have to be very organized. They prioritizecare just like ICUnurses.
  9. by   diane227
    I have worked ED, Psych, ICU, day surgery, recovery. My busiest job was ED. It was a county hospital with 350 visits per day, so we had no down time. I work med surg now and it is VERY BUSY. We maintain a 5:1 ratio on my floor. As you would expect the majority of our patients are elderly, falls, confusion, pneumonia, wounds, etc. There is just no down time. The nurses are hopping all the time. When I was first a nurse 30 years ago I started out in med surg for 1 year on a 42 bed floor staffed with 2 RN's and 2 CNA's but that was way before all the documentation and equipment requirements that we have now. I would say that med surg is one of the most challenging jobs that I have ever had.
  10. by   10ACGIRL
    Hey gals! I was tolod that there will be 1 RN per 2 pts. and there is an 8-10 bed ICU. That would/should mean there would be 4 CNA's to 4 or 5 pts. ? This is for Neuro ICU floor and if this is true, then that sounds whewwwww, alot better to me that if I were to go back to reg. med/surg floor. But then again, I'm just a CNA for a PCT (Patient Care Tech)

    Kim
    Certified Nurse Assistant
  11. by   Hoozdo
    Quote from 10ACGIRL
    Hey gals! I was tolod that there will be 1 RN per 2 pts. and there is an 8-10 bed ICU. That would/should mean there would be 4 CNA's to 4 or 5 pts. ? This is for Neuro ICU floor and if this is true, then that sounds whewwwww, alot better to me that if I were to go back to reg. med/surg floor. But then again, I'm just a CNA for a PCT (Patient Care Tech)

    Kim
    Certified Nurse Assistant
    Unfortunately, Kim, most ICUs don't have any PCT or NA. If a unit does, the
    ratio is more like 20:1. Sometimes there isn't even an unit clerk at night.

    I am not following your logic in the above post for 4 CNAs to 4 or 5 patients.
  12. by   detroitdano
    4-5 care partners for 8-10 patients? Riiight. Maybe on the eve of December 21, 2012.
  13. by   10ACGIRL
    Quote from Hoozdo
    Unfortunately, Kim, most ICUs don't have any PCT or NA. If a unit does, the
    ratio is more like 20:1. Sometimes there isn't even an unit clerk at night.

    I am not following your logic in the above post for 4 CNAs to 4 or 5 patients.
    Erlanger has PCT's which is a CNA & they Do work in ICU units there alongside the RN's. the unit I will have is an 8 bed unit and there will be 2 techs (cna's) per 4 patients and each RN has 2 pts.on that shift for that unit so....that means ea. tech will have 2 RN's to work alongside with on their shift!

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