Help Please... - page 2

Hello Fellow Nurses, I was hoping i could get some constructive input regarding my situation. I just turned 47 and am in good physical shape (thank God) and I am looking at nursing as a 2nd... Read More

  1. by   Dad-2-3
    Quote from Tom123
    Tony,

    PAWASHRN, has given you something to think about. We do have to clean up the vomit, the incontinent patients, etc. However, that is part of the compassionate caring attitude that I spoke of in my first reply.

    The comment about the physician, I have to disagree. If you obtain your BSN from an accrediated university -- I MEAN A GENERIC BSN -- then you will be in the ranks of the Professional Nurse. You will be the physician's colleague -- not a door mat. If you have the proper education, you are then equipped to communicate with the physician on his/her level. That requires you to have your BSN. I realize that this may insult those nurses with a Diploma or ADN. I am sorry. The criteria of a profession requires education in an institution of higher learning, offering a bachelor's degree in that profession.

    Go for the Gold. We need more nurses, and we especially need more male nurses.

    If I can be help, let me know. I have taught in a Collegate nursing
    program, in both the undergraduate and graduate level.

    Wishing you the best.
    First I would like to apologizs to the OP because this is a bit of a hijack, but I can't let this go. I first want to say that no offense was taken by me about the ADN VS BSN thing because I understand what you are saying. BSN obviously has more education and knowledge, but I have to disagree with the idea that unless you have a BSN you are a doormat for physicians or cannot communicate on their level. Heck I don't believe a PCA or CNA should be a doormat for a doc or nurse. I realize that often nurses get the brunt of a doc's wrath, sometimes deserved, sometimes not deserved, but the thought that unless you have a BSN you are not a colleague of the doc or unable to communicate on their level is pure baloney. I really can't believe that sort of thinking is even coming from a nurse.

    Is the LPN, CNA or PCA a doormat for the RN because they only have a certification or a lesser degree??

    Again, I apologize to the OP for the hijack.

    I think that the OP should go for it also, whether it be LPN, ASN, or BSN!! Good luck!!
  2. by   RNdude123
    Congrats on an excellent career choice, Tony. Nursing will open all kinds of doors for you that you won't believe. Just ignore the naysayers and you will be fine. Most of my friends can't believe that my family can afford for my wife to stay home full time and still live comfortably. And we just moved into a big house in a nice neighborhood to boot! The opportunities are out there if you are open-minded enough to take them.

    I'm a former IT guy that couldn't find work after being laid off. Going into nursing for me was ALL about job security, but it grew on me very quickly. The challenges are many, but I have no doubt you'll form relationships that will help you to weather them. Stick with it and you'll be glad you did.
  3. by   RNdude123
    Quote from Tom123
    If you obtain your BSN from an accrediated university -- I MEAN A GENERIC BSN -- then you will be in the ranks of the Professional Nurse. You will be the physician's colleague -- not a door mat. If you have the proper education, you are then equipped to communicate with the physician on his/her level. That requires you to have your BSN. I realize that this may insult those nurses with a Diploma or ADN. I am sorry.
    I would agree about having a bachelor's degree in general, but clinical knowlege and experience are supremely more important than a few extra letters behind your title. Not once have I ever heard a doctor question a nurse's level of education.

    And before you ask, yes, I do have my ASN. But I also have a BS from a former life. While I consider this education important, this has nothing to do with my ability to relate with the MD. Just as I'm sure you have seen ASN nurses who are unprofessional and unpolished, I have seen many BSN nurses exactly the same.

    Sorry about the rant here as well.
  4. by   nursemike
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f283/ There is a forum devoted to discussions about ADN vs. BSN vs Diploma. It's a topic which can be (and has been) debated at length, but sometimes tends to generate more heat than light.

    This thread would profit if we could avoid that briar patch.
  5. by   Tom123
    It is unfortunate that people make the wrong interpretation of a statement. Having been in Nursing for over 40 years, and having my PhD, I have seen physicians question a nurse's ability based on their educational level. One must remember that a physician has just completed a graduate degree. That physician has a Bachelor's degree, and then after 4-5 years of Med School, comes out with an MD.

    Some leaders in nursing want to see the minimum requirement for entry into the profession at the Master's Level. Physical Therapy graduates now have a Master's degree upon graduation, because their program is 5-6 years in length. Nurses have to ask if they wish to stay at the same level that is required of other Health Care Professions. Currently, nursing is the only Health Care Profession that has 3 different levels of education, to qualify to sit for the State Board. I personally believe that this is the greatest problem we have in defending the concept that Nursing is a Profession and not a Vocation. Flexner in 1910 listed the criteria of a profession. His first criteria was an education in an institution of higher learning offering a minimum of a Bachelor's degree.

    As for the CNA, the Patient Care Tech, etc. I would hope that nurses do not use them as a doormat. But regretfully, I have had to discipline nurses for just that. Some RNs and LPNs think that just because they are "nurses" they do not need to soil their hands in cleaning a patient who has been incontinent, etc. The CNA can be an extreme value to the nurse. Patients will tell them things that they do not tell the RN or LPN because they see us as authority figures. I have had CNAs come to me about conversations with patients that have been very valuable in helping me plan the patients' care.

    What I trying to say to Tony, is that he will be better prepared to take on the role of RN if he has his Generic BSN. Through that education he will be "rounded." He will recieve a minimum of 2years of concentrated nursing courses, but also will receive a sound basis in Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Sociology, English, History, etc.

    I want to see Tony become a RN. But I also want to see him receive the proper education.

    I have also seen BSN, Diploma, and ADN nurses who are excellent. I have seen some LPNs that were better than some of my RNs. However, I must question how a woman or man can truly receive a proper education in nursing, when they only have approximately one year of nursing courses? How can a person obtain the proper amount of knowledge in Psychiatric Nursing, Maternal Child Nursing, and Pediatrics, when they only have 6 weeks to study these special areas of nursing.

    Nursing Education should contain at least 3 semesters of Med/Surg, with the last semester being Advanced Med/Surg. It should also contain a semester of Peds, OB/GYN, and Psychiatry. Plus their should also be a semester devoted to Public Health Nursing, Community Health Nursing, and Leadership. There also needs to be courses in Professional Nursing -- what does it really mean, and what are you expected to do? A BSN program gives that individual an indepth knowledge of Pathophysiology. A nurse MUST know what is happening at the cellular level, and how a specific disease effects ALL other systems of the body. Technical skills do not make a nurse.

    Tony, I want to see you become a nurse. Please research different nursing programs before you make a decision on which educational route you will pursue.
  6. by   nursemike
    Tony, I was 48 when I graduated nursing school, making me immediately an average-aged RN. It's good you say you're in good shape. Nursing School can be very demanding. Finding time to maintain your health isn't easy, but exercise, a proper diet, and adequate sleep are worth the effort. Or so I'm told. I seem to remember doing most of my eating and sleeping behind the wheel as I commuted between home, school, and clinicals.

    I don't know how to know whether nursing is for you. An entry-level job, or volunteering, at a hospital could be a start. I worked as an orderly for 7 years before going to school, and several of my classmates got jobs as aides when they started school (the facility where I work hires a lot of nursing students, partly as a way of recruiting new nurses).

    Personally, I love it. The first 6 mos. as a nurse can be rather brutal, and the first year is no picnic. But you learn a lot, and as far as I can tell, you never stop learning. I can't honestly say it's never boring, but you learn to cherish the occassional boring shift. Sometimes it feels like bailing out a lifeboat with a sieve, but on the whole it's useful and rewarding work. Working around a lot of women is a treat, too. I don't mean that in a lecherous way. Well, not just a lecherous way. I like the company of strong, independent, intelligent women, and most nurses are well equipped to stand on their own hind legs and think for themselves.
  7. by   SuesquatchRN
    I'm a female peeking in here, but - I was a month shy of 53 when I got licensed as an LPN. Will be 55 when I am licensed as an RN. Plan on going all the way to the MSN level.

    Hey, you're gonna age anyway. Age doing something you like.

  8. by   TonyFl
    Thanks to everyone who posted on this thread so far. Very good information. I appreciate the professionalism.

    I have more questions that i will post in another thread for different topic.

    BTW...i have a BS degree in business. I am interested in the medical field and nursing for a few reasons.

    1)One being that i like people
    2)I want some job security

    thanks again.
  9. by   Alois Wolf
    I wish you luck and I know that if you feel you are capable of doing it physically then you probably are. Having some upper body strength is a plus, but you don't have to be a triathlon athlete or anything. Just take care of yer back! I pulled a muscle last year while trying to lift a client into his bed from his wheel chair (with assistance of course). I now use the Hoyer lift whenever I can.If you want to find out if it's something you want to do, try volunteering somewhere... it probably wont be a lot of nursing exp. but at least you would get a feel for what its like to work in the environment.
  10. by   Tom123
    Tony,

    Everyone has given you excellent advice. Look at your options, and the different programs. Which one offers you the most? Then GO FOR IT. Your age has nothing to do with your education or getting a job. The shortage of nurses is drastic. We need everyone we can get.

    Best Wishes

    Tom
  11. by   Dixiecup
    I'm a female. I couldn't even use a thermometer before I started nursing school, the only way I could tell if my kids had a fever is if they were hot to touch.

    Been a nurse for twenty years now. Graduated from LPN school when I was 30. I'm 50 now and will graduate as an NP (hopefully) in a year.
  12. by   Tom123
    Quote from Dixiecup
    I'm a female. I couldn't even use a thermometer before I started nursing school, the only way I could tell if my kids had a fever is if they were hot to touch.

    Been a nurse for twenty years now. Graduated from LPN school when I was 30. I'm 50 now and will graduate as an NP (hopefully) in a year.
    Congratulations!! That is a great achievement. Wishing you the best in the future.

    Tom

close