Advice for the new nurse entering Med-Surg - page 19

Here is your chance to give some advice and counsel to new RN's and LPN's entering their first clinical job as a nurse. What advice would you give them? I am going to make this a sticky so that... Read More

  1. by   FatCatLove
    I have been a nurse for almost 2 years now but just made the big switch to the hospital setting working on a MedSurg floor. I love being a nurse but there are days that I feel like I am so small and don't know anything. I loved reading all the comments of advice from the nurses. It helps make me feel human and normal.

    The advice that I would give any new nurse starting on any hospital floor is to ask questions, ask questions, and ask questions!!! It is okay to not know the answers to something and you are not expected to know the answers but you should always ask questions even if you think it is a dumb question.

    Asking for advice from a more experienced nurse is important too! There have been many shifts that I just needed some advice to make sure I was making the right decision and they are more than willing to listen and help you out.

    Also, if you need help ask for help. Asking for help does not make you a bad nurse. There have been many time that I needed help because my day has been crazy, the most important thing is patient safety. Also if you ask for help there will come a time that you will be able to return the favor. This show that you are a team player and your shifts will get better and better.

    Lastly, your nursing assistants are so important and valuable. They need to be shown respect and trust. Having a nursing assistant that is helpful will make all the difference in your shift. They are your eyes and ears when you aren't there and some times they find things that you may have missed. When you show respect to the nursing assistant they will in turn show respect back to you!
  2. by   amanda.shay.morrison
    I just want to thank everyone for the awesome advice. I have been working in psych/addictions over a year now and got a little bored so wanted to get into med surg. I'm on a stoke/tele/GM floor. I'm still on orientation but will be on my own soon and am TERRIFIED! Thanks everyone for all the good advice.
  3. by   ShayRN0217
    Quote from FatCatLove
    I have been a nurse for almost 2 years now but just made the big switch to the hospital setting working on a MedSurg floor. I love being a nurse but there are days that I feel like I am so small and don't know anything. I loved reading all the comments of advice from the nurses. It helps make me feel human and normal.

    The advice that I would give any new nurse starting on any hospital floor is to ask questions, ask questions, and ask questions!!! It is okay to not know the answers to something and you are not expected to know the answers but you should always ask questions even if you think it is a dumb question.

    Asking for advice from a more experienced nurse is important too! There have been many shifts that I just needed some advice to make sure I was making the right decision and they are more than willing to listen and help you out.

    Also, if you need help ask for help. Asking for help does not make you a bad nurse. There have been many time that I needed help because my day has been crazy, the most important thing is patient safety. Also if you ask for help there will come a time that you will be able to return the favor. This show that you are a team player and your shifts will get better and better.

    Lastly, your nursing assistants are so important and valuable. They need to be shown respect and trust. Having a nursing assistant that is helpful will make all the difference in your shift. They are your eyes and ears when you aren't there and some times they find things that you may have missed. When you show respect to the nursing assistant they will in turn show respect back to you!
    Thank you so much for posting this. I am a new nurse in MedSurg and feel so slow and incompetent. I have only been on my own for 1 week. Already, there have been days that I feel as though I've made a mistake and days that I love it. I work with an amazing team, but feel as though I am not as competent as the other nurses, including the new ones. I hope that I get better and soon!
  4. by   stevii
    Is it better to round with the doctors when they come to the floor so we know the plan, or is it better to get ur meds and get them passed on time?
  5. by   Bowtiegirl
    Thank you! I'm a brand new nurse who is older and I start my first job in two days. I wanted med-surg for the skills and experience that I will gain as a new nurse. I'm so scared and excited! I will be serving our nation's veterans. Hoo-rah!
  6. by   caffeinatednurse
    Learn how to take and give report quickly and efficiently. You don't have to write down everything that your coworker tells you when they give you report, but you should always have on hand: when the pt was admitted, their admitting dx, their code status, their treatment team, what we're treating them for, any drains/tubes/lines, any upcoming tests/procedures, any fluids running, their diet, how they ambulate, etc. You can always write down more later if you wish, but these are the basics. You want to learn the art of giving a complete and accurate report without holding up that nurse with an overly long report that will also hold up your coworkers needing to give report to the same nurse. It takes practice, but it's totally possible.

    Stick as many people as you can until you become comfortable at doing it. Offer to do the blood draws for central lines for your coworkers. Volunteer to insert Foleys. Volunteer to take the difficult patients - the patients that nobody else wants because they're needy, drug addicted, in restraints, whatever it may be. Do as much as you can and experience as much as you can during your first six months on the unit. You won't regret it, I promise. It's the only way to gain the skills that you need to work any area of acute care.

    Ask your coworkers for advice, and be prepared to use what they tell you. You might be surprised at what you hear, but you will likely be a better nurse for knowing where to improve or how to handle a certain situation.

    Most importantly, don't panic - even when you have to call a rapid response or code blue. No situation is made better by panicking.
  7. by   Bowtiegirl
    Thanks!

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