How many Prereqs will I need for my BSN? - page 2

by Mrsearly2009 3,384 Views | 15 Comments

I am looking for advice on how many prereq classes it will take for my BSN. I do understand that every school is different but I am just looking to get a general idea so I can start taking these classes and be a step closer to... Read More


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    You answered your own question. Every school is different. States are different. Programs are different.
    loriangel14 likes this.
  2. 1
    I would like to re-iterate what others have said. Check with the programs you are interested in and go from there. Here in IL, I am amazed at the prerequisite differences. Northern Illinois U's BSN program only requires one basic chemistry w/ a lab (was really easy), and ONE semester of P&A worth 5 credit hours (if taken at NIU; if taken at community college, the two P&A classes worth eight credit hours transfer in as five), not the standard 2 classes most programs require. Also, sociology is not a prerequisite.

    Contrast that with University of Illinois - Chicago, the other large state school with a BSN program in my area. Two or even three (can't remember offhand) chem classes (the hard ones!, not the basic one like NIU), sociology, and 2 semesters of A&P. Both state schools, both BSN programs, an hour away from each other, both competitive, both in Illinois, etc.,...yet huge difference in prerequisites! I would like to go to U of I - Chicago b/c of its closer links to large hospitals with more specialty areas, but completing those prerequisites in chemistry would set me back at least a year, since they run in sequence. And getting As in them would be a lot tougher than the easy chem I took for NIU's requirement.

    You really do have to kind of work backwards from the program you think you are interested in and believe you can get into when planning which prerequisites to take. And don't be discouraged if later you find out you took a class you thought you needed and it does not end up fulfilling any requirements. It happens to a lot of students along the way.
    loriangel14 likes this.
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    If you hold an associates degree you shouldn't have to do ANY pre-req's. I would pass over any school that required pre-req's from an experienced RN with an accociated degree.
  4. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    If you hold an associates degree you shouldn't have to do ANY pre-req's. I would pass over any school that required pre-req's from an experienced RN with an accociated degree.
    Every single school in our area requires prereqs. We aren't required to even complete college level math to enter our program, so things like that have to be completed and then courses like statistics, chemistry, etc. I believe we only have 30 gen Ed requirements in the ADN, while there are 60 to receive a bachelor's degree.
  5. 0
    Quote from Stephalump
    Every single school in our area requires prereqs. We aren't required to even complete college level math to enter our program, so things like that have to be completed and then courses like statistics, chemistry, etc. I believe we only have 30 gen Ed requirements in the ADN, while there are 60 to receive a bachelor's degree.
    *** Ya same for my state. That's why I rejected them in favor of a programs that didn't require any. It's rediculous to require lower division work from a holder of an associated degree. If everybody would reject those schools who do they would have to mend their ways.
    Take a look at Nova Southeastern's RN to BSN program for one example.
  6. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN

    *** Ya same for my state. That's why I rejected them in favor of a programs that didn't require any. It's rediculous to require lower division work from a holder of an associated degree. If everybody would reject those schools who do they would have to mend their ways.
    Take a look at Nova Southeastern's RN to BSN program for one example.
    Texas has a thing called "core completion." the government mandates what lower level courses everyone has to have and once you complete the set out hours, you're core compete and it follows you to any school in Texas you transfer to. Good because you don't have to take extra lower level junk after you get an associates degree. But the nursing schools get around it somehow and I'm not sure why. I guess because they include it in their degree plan instead of calling it gen Ed.

    I don't know, but I totally agree with you! Once you have your associated degree, you should only have upper level work to do.


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