LPNs: Myths And Misconceptions (Part IV) - page 3

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

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Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) have made significant contributions to the nursing profession in several different countries for many years. However, a multitude of myths and misconceptions exist that threaten to tarnish their... Read More


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    Nosing around NYS's website came upon this:

    http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/nurse/d...stage-care.pdf

    Just a bit more information, do with it what you will.
  2. 0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Nosing around NYS's website came upon this:

    http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/nurse/d...stage-care.pdf

    Just a bit more information, do with it what you will.
    I do believe for a brief period of time LVN's were allowed to IV push certain medications in a dialysis center but CNA or one of the pro RN lobbying bodies got that struck down.

    Though realistically they do need to be able to find a way to provide good dialysis care at an affordable price.
  3. 2
    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    Though realistically they do need to be able to find a way to provide good dialysis care at an affordable price.
    Yes, especially with all of the Medicare and Medicaid cutbacks. In the future, I suspect that freestanding dialysis centers are going to find ways to operate with less RNs and more dialysis technicians and LPNs. After all, these facilities are already being pinched to the max.
    nursel56 and tothepointeLVN like this.
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    Absolutely and with Type II diabetes becoming more common we are going to start seeing more and more patients on dialysis so price wise somethings got to give. Might as well transfer some responsibilities to the LVN than to expand the dialysis technicians role.

    Economics are going to have more of an influence on the LVN/LPN role than any nursing union or public opinion. LPN's haven't been completely phased out and are dominant in certain areas like LTC and home health.

    Personally I would like to see the LVN role/education to be expanded to fit the niche the transition away from ADN to BSN have left. Expand the length and content of the education required but keep the accessibility the same. Meaning have the core disciplines such as A+P integrated into the program so there isn't that 1 year prereq bottleneck before application. I feel we lose a lot of good nurses that way because the barrier to entry is so high
    tazmom and nursel56 like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    Absolutely and with Type II diabetes becoming more common we are going to start seeing more and more patients on dialysis so price wise somethings got to give. Might as well transfer some responsibilities to the LVN than to expand the dialysis technicians role.

    Economics are going to have more of an influence on the LVN/LPN role than any nursing union or public opinion. LPN's haven't been completely phased out and are dominant in certain areas like LTC and home health.

    Personally I would like to see the LVN role/education to be expanded to fit the niche the transition away from ADN to BSN have left. Expand the length and content of the education required but keep the accessibility the same. Meaning have the core disciplines such as A+P integrated into the program so there isn't that 1 year prereq bottleneck before application. I feel we lose a lot of good nurses that way because the barrier to entry is so high
    How long have I been saying that?

    States should take a page from Canada. When the move was made to make the RN require a BSN for entry the LPNs have a two year degree and their own sphere of practice.

    Take your standard LPN program and raise the bar to an associate degree. Add some good sciences and others courses to provide a firm foundation for bedside and "technical" care.
  6. 0
    It's the best solution the only thing I'm concerned about is accessibility. Integrate those science courses in. Don't make it like RN programs where you have to take 2 years to jump over hoops just to get a chance to start.

    I remember when I live in NZ and was looking at studying design they had a program which was typical of certain education programs. You do the first year you got a certificate, you do the second year you got a diploma, you go the third year you got your bachelors degree. Also make home the CNA/PCT role requires a one year certificate. Qualification Overview
  7. 0
    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    It's the best solution the only thing I'm concerned about is accessibility. Integrate those science courses in. Don't make it like RN programs where you have to take 2 years to jump over hoops just to get a chance to start.

    I remember when I live in NZ and was looking at studying design they had a program which was typical of certain education programs. You do the first year you got a certificate, you do the second year you got a diploma, you go the third year you got your bachelors degree. Also make home the CNA/PCT role requires a one year certificate. Qualification Overview
    Accessibility is all very well, but from where one is sitting if LPNs have prayer of getting back into acute care settings in any big way the bar is going to have to be raised. This would probably translate into more focus on theory and rationale along with ratching up more of the "thinking" skills as opposed to merely technical ones.
  8. 0
    Yes the bar needs to be raised but if there is the same barriers to entry for a LPN program as there are to an RN program then why would any one chose the former? It is possible to have a program that is integrated with an appropriate entry exam system.


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