Disease and s/s - page 6

Hey there. I'm an Student Practical Nurse in training. In my course, as I'm sure in others, it is required for us to know some of the common diseases and the s/s associated with it. Now, in testing,... Read More

  1. by   peridotgirl
    Quote from daytonite
    buck's traction is effective as a temporary measure to keep a fracture reduced and decrease the pain until the docs can repair it. the traction is applied to the broken leg--not the good leg. i have only seen it used in the acute hospital for people with hip fractures and these people are sent to surgery asap unless they have some critical medical problem preventing them from undergoing anesthesia right away. i wouldn't know about it's use with chronic contractures or muscles spasms, but i can surmise that since it is temporary, the patient can be taken on and off the traction in order to be able to do things. when we had patients in pelvic traction we would disconnect them so they could get up and go to the bathroom--no problem. with muscle spasms you always want to s-t-r-e-t-c-h the muscle that is spasming. any physical trainer will tell you that. some people get muscle spasms all the time due to pinched nerves. traction will work to help with that. the type of traction you use depends on what muscles are spasming and where they are located.

    the velcro boots i've seen are just that, like a lower leg boot that fits onto the foot and leg and there are a couple of wide velcro straps that you tape down to hold the boot in place rather than shoe laces (i found a website with a picture of one and listed it below so you can look at one). they have a metal bar attached to the sole of the boot that accommodates the traction rope.

    a bone breaks and there are, in the simple cases, two halves (segments). a lot of things happen when a bone breaks. the blood vessels, bone marrow and surrounding soft tissues are also damaged and disrupted--not just the bone itself. bleeding can occur into the surrounding soft tissues because of tearing of blood vessels. some bone tissue, particularly at the actual site of the fracture, dies and this stimulates the body to begin an inflammatory response (remember the cardinal signs of inflammation in order of occurrence are redness, heat, swelling, pain). when a bone fractures, there will be deformity (due to the misalignment of the bone fragments), swelling (due to the inflammatory response), muscle spasm (due to the natural tendency for a muscle to shorten), tenderness (due to trauma), pain (due to trauma, inflammation and muscle spasm) and impaired sensation (due to damaged or pinched off nerves). the position of the bone segments is determined by the pull of the muscles that are attached to that particular bone, which are in spasm, and by the forces that caused the fracture in the first place.

    what the traction does is p-u-l-l and the distal segment of a broken bone away from the proximal segment. this does two things:
    • stops the bones from overriding against each other
    • reduces muscle spasms
    thus, pain is reduced.

    a picture is worth a thousand words:
    thank u so much for this information. so lemme c if i understand this correctly. the purpose of buck's traction is to stretch and pull the muscle that is spamsing. when the pt is on it, it is temporary. the traction help to realign the bones and prevent the rubbing of the two bones against one another, thus reducing inflammation. this type of traction also keeps the pt's fractured bone immbolized as possible, but it allows them to get up ad lib. once again, i thank u for you're information. i can't wait to share this with my classmates.
  2. by   peridotgirl
    thank you Daytonite. the pics are great! I understand know. and it all makes sense. Because of this type of traction, it requires the nurse to montior the pt for vs and also do nuerovasuclar checks.
  3. by   Daytonite
    No, you are not understanding all the information correctly. Re-read my two posts or print them out and highlight portions of them. There is a lot of information there to assimilate.
  4. by   peridotgirl
    ok, I'll re read them.
  5. by   peridotgirl
    Does anybody here have any advice on how to conquer all those "select all the apply" questions. I got some of those questions on a test (ATI) and I didn't do soo well. thank you.
    Last edit by peridotgirl on Jan 18, '08
  6. by   peridotgirl
    also, for the SATA (select all that apply) questions I heard that there is a possiblilty the only 1 answer is right out of the 5 possible choices. Is this true?
  7. by   peridotgirl
    I wanted to thank all of you have replied to my original post. I really appreciate it. I was wondering though, does anyone know a good way to remember the s/s for all electrolyte imbalances such as HYPOmagnesia, hypermagnesia, hypernatremia/ hyponatremia,hyperkalemia /hypokalemia etc. thank u.. :typing
  8. by   proud2b1
    I am pretty sure the drug of choice is allopurinol and antiinflammatory agents,an low nas non acidic diet.My dad suffers from these flare ups,he can not,well is supposed to not eat tomatoes!!
    I try to relate every area in the body like a chapter in a good book.You know,lab levels usually always a cbc hba1c chem 7 and hem and start things rolling a little.vs and skin color and mental status are another,then you have your lung sounds and gi status.I found most of these to play a big role in just about all the diseses or infections.It is kind of hard to explain,but as one already noted they all play into one another,like a car and its parts,if one thing is off another will follow!
  9. by   peridotgirl
    Quote from proud2b1
    I am pretty sure the drug of choice is allopurinol and antiinflammatory agents,an low nas non acidic diet.My dad suffers from these flare ups,he can not,well is supposed to not eat tomatoes!!
    I try to relate every area in the body like a chapter in a good book.You know,lab levels usually always a cbc hba1c chem 7 and hem and start things rolling a little.vs and skin color and mental status are another,then you have your lung sounds and gi status.I found most of these to play a big role in just about all the diseses or infections.It is kind of hard to explain,but as one already noted they all play into one another,like a car and its parts,if one thing is off another will follow!
    I'm sorry but I misunderstood your post. What were u trying to say? Are you telling me that I should observe the pt when I'm doing a head-to-toe assessment as s/s can indicate an electrolyte imbalance?
    Last edit by peridotgirl on Mar 10, '08
  10. by   proud2b1
    peridotgirl:I am sorry.I thought I responded to treatments for gout.I thought I read something about how signs and symtoms can indicate disease?Frankly I am not sure what I was responding to lol lol.I get on this thing and get to caught up in all there is to read,I guess!

    Again sorry if I confused you in any way or wasted your time.I was only trying to help!!:typing:typing:yldhdbng:
  11. by   peridotgirl
    Quote from proud2b1
    peridotgirl:I am sorry.I thought I responded to treatments for gout.I thought I read something about how signs and symtoms can indicate disease?Frankly I am not sure what I was responding to lol lol.I get on this thing and get to caught up in all there is to read,I guess!

    Again sorry if I confused you in any way or wasted your time.I was only trying to help!!:typing:typing:yldhdbng:
    Hello, proudtobe1. no need to apologize. Actually if you were indeed responding to one of my posts that I asked about s/s of gout, you're previous post makes sense. thank you for that info. I just got confused because I thoought you were responding to the post about the electrolyte imbalances. it's okay. Next time you reply though, because there r numerous questions I ask, make sure "quote" the message so I can kno which post you're replying too. And no u didn't waste my time. you provided good information. btw, now that is al cleared up, do you know the answer to posts #72? thank you and I appreciate it.
  12. by   peridotgirl
    does any one know an easier way to remeber the s/s for electrolyte imbalances?? thank you...
  13. by   lil' girl
    I would say it mostly depends on how long the situation has been going on. Say for instance for 3-4 days, you would notice dry skin, dry mucus membranes, poor skin turgor, and of course the always increased confusion (which may or may not be hard to assess if you don't know the patient well, say someone who has just appeared in ED).

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