Question for LNCs

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    I went right into L&D after graduating with BSN and have done nothing but L&D/LDRP for 14 years. Recently, hospital administration is making noises about L&D nurses floating other areas. Of course, you float or get fired. I took a legal course for nurses a few years ago that recommended the RN who is floated to an unfamiliar area have the nurse supervisor sign a statement (prepared by the RN) acknowledging that he/she, as a representative of the hospital, is aware that the RN, although willing to accept the assignment, has never worked in that area nor been adequately oriented. Unfortunately, now that I need it, I cannot find that piece of paper! Can any of you legal eagles come up with the verbiage I need? Thanks for your help! I doubt it would do much in court; however, maybe it will make the supervisor think hard about that decision.
    Alley
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  4. 0
    Quote from FLAlleycat
    I went right into L&D after graduating with BSN and have done nothing but L&D/LDRP for 14 years. Recently, hospital administration is making noises about L&D nurses floating other areas. Of course, you float or get fired. I took a legal course for nurses a few years ago that recommended the RN who is floated to an unfamiliar area have the nurse supervisor sign a statement (prepared by the RN) acknowledging that he/she, as a representative of the hospital, is aware that the RN, although willing to accept the assignment, has never worked in that area nor been adequately oriented. Unfortunately, now that I need it, I cannot find that piece of paper! Can any of you legal eagles come up with the verbiage I need? Thanks for your help! I doubt it would do much in court; however, maybe it will make the supervisor think hard about that decision.
    Alley
    Hi FLAlleycat. Personally, I don't think that a supervisor would sign a form admitting a lack of orientation. I know mine wouldn't. She would have a hard time blaming it on the adminstration above her if something were to happen if she were to sign it. Are they offering any orientation at all? I know that when I used to float to telemetry, I did not have my ACLS yet, so they would have another nurse cover my heart monitors and I would be responsible for everything else. I knew that if something were to happen, it would fall on me since I was assigned to the patient. There was nothing else I could do. I didn't want to lose my job. Not a good feeling!
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    Quote from preoprn
    Hi FLAlleycat. Personally, I don't think that a supervisor would sign a form admitting a lack of orientation. I know mine wouldn't. She would have a hard time blaming it on the adminstration above her if something were to happen if she were to sign it. Are they offering any orientation at all? I know that when I used to float to telemetry, I did not have my ACLS yet, so they would have another nurse cover my heart monitors and I would be responsible for everything else. I knew that if something were to happen, it would fall on me since I was assigned to the patient. There was nothing else I could do. I didn't want to lose my job. Not a good feeling!
    I can understand a supervisor probably would not sign such a form. I think, however, that I will go ahead and have one prepared. After all, our scope of practice states that RNs will work in areas in which they are competent. I will present the form to the supervisor in the presence of my charge nurse or a peer and ask that they witness that the supervisor was presented the form notifying her that I am not competent in the area to which I am being floated and to which I have not been adequately oriented. I float to postpartum perhaps 2-3 times a year. I would not consider a one-night orientation sufficient to cover another night perhaps 4 months later. If anything should happen to the patient due to my lack of competency in that area, I have no qualms throwing it back onto the hospital during the inevitable law suit . . . and suing the hospital, if possible, for the emotional damage incurred as I would feel horrific knowing what I did/didn't do harmed a patient. I can, of course, refuse the assignment and be placed on suspension without pay or fired . . . that would probably be the best option for the patient! Then, check with a lawyer about suing the hospital for the termination. Thanks for the reply.
    Alley
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    Found this in another thread: Sorry, went to the url given and the Assignment Despite Objection Form has been removed
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    Do a search for the thread titled "Assignment Despite Objection Form" and you will find a post that essentially has much of the wording of the form although all references to the source (www.uannurse.org) come up invalid.
  8. 0
    Quote from FLAlleycat
    I can understand a supervisor probably would not sign such a form. I think, however, that I will go ahead and have one prepared. After all, our scope of practice states that RNs will work in areas in which they are competent. I will present the form to the supervisor in the presence of my charge nurse or a peer and ask that they witness that the supervisor was presented the form notifying her that I am not competent in the area to which I am being floated and to which I have not been adequately oriented. I float to postpartum perhaps 2-3 times a year. I would not consider a one-night orientation sufficient to cover another night perhaps 4 months later. If anything should happen to the patient due to my lack of competency in that area, I have no qualms throwing it back onto the hospital during the inevitable law suit . . . and suing the hospital, if possible, for the emotional damage incurred as I would feel horrific knowing what I did/didn't do harmed a patient. I can, of course, refuse the assignment and be placed on suspension without pay or fired . . . that would probably be the best option for the patient! Then, check with a lawyer about suing the hospital for the termination. Thanks for the reply.
    Alley
    I would not consider one night of orientation adequate either. Quite a dilemma. I wish you luck. Let us know how it works out for you.


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