Liability education - page 2

by kathys 3,031 Views | 15 Comments

Why do colleges and hospitals not thoroughly educate nurses about the law and what we should know as practicing nurses?... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from purplemania
    ... Law is changing constantly so it would be very hard to keep up and if the instructor is not entirely accurate, would they be liable for my mistake in practice?...
    Not a real reason to not have this coursework. Lots of practice areas are in flux all the time... as they should be.

    And no, there wouldn't be any liability on the part of the prof for teaching. He's not providing legal advice through the class... only reviewing general concepts and particular sets of facts present in the cases discussed. The law is very situation specific.
  2. 0
    Quote from LarryG
    Not a real reason to not have this coursework. Lots of practice areas are in flux all the time... as they should be.

    And no, there wouldn't be any liability on the part of the prof for teaching. He's not providing legal advice through the class... only reviewing general concepts and particular sets of facts present in the cases discussed. The law is very situation specific.
    The law is freaking gray!!!

    There is just so much left to objectivity that I feel like sometimes we are walking a legal tight rope.
    Is what is best for the patient what is best for society?
    Why is it my decision to make?

    It is really tough sometimes.
  3. 0
    Quote from RNin92
    The law is freaking gray!!!

    There is just so much left to objectivity that I feel like sometimes we are walking a legal tight rope.
    Is what is best for the patient what is best for society?
    Why is it my decision to make?

    It is really tough sometimes.
    Again, in some situations it is gray. In others, more clear-cut. It's critical to have a good notion of which is which.

    And yup, sometimes it's tough to make the correct call. So important for us to stay on top of the standards that govern what we do. But, when faced with a decision we're not sure of, we've usually got our superiors / peers to consult with. Also a good idea to have a general plan in case of an emergency.

    On the patient versus society thing: Think that one's an easy call. Our job is to be concerned only with the patient we've been entrusted to care for. Higher level, societal issues are for politicians and others (including us, if we wish to participate after work).

    You're also correct that it's a bear sometimes coming up with the best way to go.

    Let's keep in mind though that this isn't the only profession where difficult decisions are made on a daily basis.
  4. 0
    ...
    Last edit by fiestynurse on Dec 24, '04
  5. 0
    I think most schools DO touch well on legal aspects of nursing. (mine sure as heck did , ad nauseum). Once becoming professional, practicing nurses, it is incumbent on all of us CONTINUE our OWN education in this aspect, as well as ANY related to nursing practice. The schools cannot do it all and we certainly have at our disposal a vast array of seminars, books and conferences we can read or attend that cover these issues AT LENGTH. It's OUR responsibility to seek this knowledge regarding OUR professional practice.
  6. 0
    "My BSN program had a required law and ethics course that was taught by an RN/JD. I graduated in 1978 from a somewhat progressive program. I remember talking about the Nurse Practice Act and tort law. We also had some really good ethical debates." fiestynurse

    I am just finishing up my last month of school (RN accelerated program) :hatparty: and we too had a "law and ethics course" during our 25 mth program. As you stated, we too learned the aspects of law as it relates to Nursing and yes lots of ethical debates in class.
    It is interesting to see that this aspect of nursing school has not been widely accepted (or the time not made to include it).
    Erin


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