Philippines, Canada. Career conflict: Pursuing education. Help, please? - page 2

by sntb_nrs 2,178 Views | 19 Comments

Before my asking questions, what is it like to be in my shoes? I was one year and a half into finishing my nursing degree in the Philippines when we were called to come to Canada. I'm a permanent resident here so that means I... Read More


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    I concur with above poster, how are you going to get this experience when it is reported, half a million nurses in the Philipines are out of work.
    What you are proposing is to leave a country with difficulty getting work, but it is still there for nurses and good pay
    To a country with no work for nurses and free labour (if you manage to get in) and little pay (if you manage to get a job amongst the 500000 unemployed.
    On your return you will be an IEN with nursing education not focused on the culture of your new country and will have to pass the national test without being educated for it. Then you will compete for jobs with nurses that were educated in Canada.

    The only thing you will gain in your plan is easy access to a nursing education in another country and most likely cheaper.

    Most people believe that are born and bred in western countries that others emmigrate there for a ' better life, more opportunities, better lifestyle than country one has wants to leave, you want to do immigration back to your original country, those of us that live in countries with high immigration intakes find this bizzare and feel that yes, you wanted immigration to be given a new chance in life, but you are not happy to do the hard yards getting nursing education in your new country that is geared towards the culture in your new country as the locals, this is often felt as slightly traitorish (excuse the bluntness)...do not take this personally, you are one of hundreds.

    Gaining nursing education back in old country has turned on people that have immigrated and then returned to the Phillipines for nursing education in the United States and now they find themselves without recognised nursing education back in the United States, say this happens in Canada.

    Though it sounds you have made your mind up and want someone to concur with your plan...good luck
    Last edit by ceridwyn on May 17, '13
    jaymee0891, Ginger's Mom, and Fiona59 like this.
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    Quote from sntb_nrs
    Yep, Canada is my new home. But i was just thinking about it as a whole- which would be more practical in terms of time and finances. I'm not saying we have financial problems, just which is more practical, btw. Because the Community college I wanted to go to school in (i opted this school because they could credit some of my education and not require me to get high school subjects, as this is time consuming and it's the one of the best nursing education here, according to a lot of people) might have me studying there in january 2014 at the very most because of the waitlist. And this is just the start of a 1.5 yr LPN program.
    I was thinking, what if I go back to the Phils and graduate by 2015, get the board and some experience and come back to Canada?
    What do you think?
    There are no shortcuts,there is a reason why they do not accept your previous education and ask you to take high school subjects. it is as a nurse. If your goal is to be a Canadian nurse go to school in Canada.In the long run it is the cheapest way, no airfare, no long waits to have your transcripts evaluated ( and based on the fact you are being asked to repeat courses you would have much make up work to do).

    also going to school in Canada will help support the local economy and help you to have local roots.
    Fiona59 and sntb_nrs like this.
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    Point taken. Thanks!
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    Yeah, I guess I was just waiting for someone to give me a reason to go back home. I'm going through a rough time adjusting as I just moved here and I was hoping that I could still go back, if not for just a while.
    Just to clear things up, I am young and still do not know what career path to take and where ; but Nursing-wise, So far you guys cleared this up for me and logically the best thing to do is to stay. Thanks!
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    if I were you, I'd stay in Canada. Philippine education may be cheaper, but that doesn't mean it's a good deal for you based on your situation. I mean, if your intention is to go back to Canada after finishing your nursing program, then you have to realise that being an IEN, you will have to go through months of credential evaluations, IELTS, and back and forth correspondents. And applying to any colleges of nursing (BON) in Canada means you have to pass the NLE in the Philippines first before they make you eligible for registration, which adds more months of waiting.
    Fiona59 and Esme12 like this.
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    sntb_nrs, can i ask a question? you're going to start your class in jan 2014 with an LPN program right? are you still going to take high school subjects or upgrade something? i plan to take a university transfer.. and i am also having the same dilemma as yours. i am also a permanent resident and left my school in the philippines..well the difference is that im taking up medicine and im supposed to be in 3rd year so it hurts me to leave it i hope you could answer my question XD
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    Heyy blueee,

    So, yeah. It actually depends on which kind of school you plan to go to. And i'm thinkingwhich province you're in is a factor in giving credentials. But i'm pretty much sure you have to make up for most of it. Anywaaaay, Some schools wanted me to get some hs subjects, some just asked me to do an assessment exam. When i inquired in a univesity, tho, i needed a semester (in addition to the nsg program) to catch up on le basicuniversity courses eventhough i came from a university >.<
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    Quote from sntb_nrs
    Heyy blueee,

    So, yeah. It actually depends on which kind of school you plan to go to. And i'm thinkingwhich province you're in is a factor in giving credentials. But i'm pretty much sure you have to make up for most of it. Anywaaaay, Some schools wanted me to get some hs subjects, some just asked me to do an assessment exam. When i inquired in a univesity, tho, i needed a semester (in addition to the nsg program) to catch up on le basicuniversity courses eventhough i came from a university >.<
    Several provinces that have experience in assessing education in the Phillipines have found that many of your university courses in the first year are only the equivalent of Grade 12 in High School.

    Why not just as requested and ace the courses if you are so confident in your education?
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    I don't have the luxury of time. Sadly.
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    Quote from sntb_nrs
    I don't have the luxury of time. Sadly.
    I think you answered your own question the quickest way to finish school and get a license is to stay in Canada, if you can not successfully challenge the tests, you will need the information to practice in Canada. So you can stay and learn the Canadian way, or go out of the country and wait endlessly to have your credentials evaluated and then struggle to pass the board exam.
    Fiona59 and loriangel14 like this.


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