Nursing shortage?? - page 2

by KylaRN

4,950 Views | 14 Comments

Hello, I'm a US travel nurse that is looking into international travel. An Australian nurse I work with says there's a major shortage there but when I look online I get very conflicting views. I'm not looking to take away jobs... Read More


  1. 0
    '1:38 am by lorodzyes, of all english speaking countries, the u.k., australia and new zealand requires you to have at least a 7 of each subtest in the ielts exam. but if you took your nursing degree in the usa, you don't need to take that exam. '



    this is incorrect.......how come the nurses from the usa are so honoured!
    the ahpra guidelines for english requirement is that most countries where english is considered first and foremost english language no ielts test is required that includes the uk (we do not need to take ielts if you are educated/born in australia), nz, canada, ireland, south africa.

    unless you have experience in a needed specialty......jobs are now far more difficult to obtain.

    and australalia is educating enough new nurses, though now that there are many international nurses with no experience have been excepted into our health system, this has had some effect in many areas that there is not the availability for our own new graduates that were not excepted into a graduate program to find work for an rn with little experience,in many places.





    australia is seen as this never ending place of employment for nurses with all scopes of inexperience/experience and it has to end as seen in the usa, canada and uk. australia has much less population so this will happen soon, very soon as there are even more nurses applying here and as quickly as bridging programs can keep increasing their student numbers for the sake of the dollar, where they find clinical placements will take the students for sponsorship visas, it has to end.

    btw employers can put down on sponsorship applications anything that suits requirements. its much cheaper to pay for a visa for a foreign nurse, that will work any shifts,accept any lower grade, does not know the pay, will not question their management, than pay the advertising/recruitment people for an australian nurse that does know their grading system and pay rates and will question management if they think their patients/residents are not getting the best care available.


    Last edit by ceridwyn on Feb 10, '12
  2. 0
    :spin: Google is a web crawler and will find one position as advertised 10-20 times the same position from different advertising companies and if one looks closer at requirements...an ability to already have work rights in Australia is required often a requirement. If you do not have a working holiday visa, pr or citizenship you will not have this requirement.
    Last edit by ceridwyn on Feb 11, '12
  3. 0
    Dear Ceridwyn,
    As far as I agree with you many times, this time I have to disagree with your point that foreign nurses would work under lousy conditions aka lower salary, lower grade or nearly illegal shifts and bad management.
    Maybe some do so, but many European / North American nurses go (come) to Australia to work for few years to gain experience and for the adventure. Maybe the reasons aren't so glorious, but how many times they are, when deserting perfecly fine permanent job, just to find out how the life goes on at the other side of the Globe?
  4. 0
    . .
    Last edit by ceridwyn on Feb 11, '12
  5. 0
    In the same way, Savonina, as the 50% or so of my colleagues who've worked, or plan to work, in the UK for a couple of years. It's aboutt he experience and the travel, and nothing to do with the money or an interest in long term migration.


Top