Hospitals with IV, or Vascular Access Teams

  1. I am interested in the direction of hospitals with IV Teams or Vascular Access. Size, makeup,(RN,LPN),services provided by team, status as to any redisign, and hospital bed size. I am interested in collecting data for a proposal. Our Vascular Access team has gone from 21 to 9 over the past 3 years. This seems to be the trend.
    Thank You, Dan
    •  
  2. 29 Comments

  3. by   Miss RNC
    I did not even know that IV teams still existed
  4. by   AdminRN
    We currently have an IV team - but considering eliminating. It's a mixture of RNs (5) and LPN (3). We are a 600+ bed academic medical center. It operates 24 hours/day 7 days/week.

    How many others out there still have IV teams?

    ------------------
  5. by   Marjie
    Unfortunately, I am one of those almost extinct IV Nurses. I am one of 2 part-time RNs on the "IV Team". I work in a 350 bed hospital. Our scheduled hours are Mon - Sat, 9-5. We work over-time on a regular basis. Our job description presently includes : Midline/PICC insertion and care, difficult IV insertions, some education, troubleshooting and VAD expert among other things. We are presently trying to decide what we can continue to do with the manpower we have, what we will have to give up and who will do it. We feel the patient will be the one to ultemately feel the consequenses, but feel we must go to a consulting role which would include midline/PICC insertion and a lot more education. If any one else has any suggestions, I'd love to hear from you. I really feel administration is making a mistake by removing the IV Nurse beacuse every nurse CANNOT insert an IV and the patient suffers numerous painful unsuccessful sticks that can be avoided by utilizing an experienced, skilled IV Nurse.
  6. by   asteiner
    A very interesting topic.

    We still have an IV team for difficult starts. We have a policy: try twice then let someone else try.

    I work on a BMT unit, so we infrequently see Peripheral IVs come our way. Mostly VAD. There have been many a night when I have thanked our IV team for providing this invaluable service. I think our patients agree as well.
  7. by   Juliana
    Hy
    Iam a portuguese nurse, and i was surprise to find out that an "IV team" exists. In my country, nurses are trained to do everything. We do not have teams that do specific works and we dont have as many specialitys as you do. But, just in case, i am not understanding correctly - What exactly are the dutys of a IV nurse?

    ------------------
    Juliana
  8. by   Deb2300
    Originally posted by Marjie:
    Unfortunately, I am one of those almost extinct IV Nurses. I am one of 2 part-time RNs on the "IV Team". I work in a 350 bed hospital. Our scheduled hours are Mon - Sat, 9-5. We work over-time on a regular basis. Our job description presently includes : Midline/PICC insertion and care, difficult IV insertions, some education, troubleshooting and VAD expert among other things. We are presently trying to decide what we can continue to do with the manpower we have, what we will have to give up and who will do it. We feel the patient will be the one to ultemately feel the consequenses, but feel we must go to a consulting role which would include midline/PICC insertion and a lot more education. If any one else has any suggestions, I'd love to hear from you. I really feel administration is making a mistake by removing the IV Nurse beacuse every nurse CANNOT insert an IV and the patient suffers numerous painful unsuccessful sticks that can be avoided by utilizing an experienced, skilled IV Nurse.
    Nursing Ed has taken on the task of educating one nurse per wing for PICC line certification and L-caths. Not an easy undertaking. It has taken close to 2 years for this to become a reality, but it's working. Most PICCs are not placed in an emergency setting and can wait a day or two.
    We've never had an IV team, but I would like to see one formed. Not cost effective, however. You're right when saying some nurses lack the finer skills of inserting IV's, but we never have trouble finding someone who is willing to help. We like to call the Nurse Educator, it keeps her sharp.
  9. by   YADA-YADA
    Our hospital is 250 beds. We have an IV team on 24/7. The floor nurses do flushes but all restarts are done by IV team. It is great. The IV nurses are excellent, one stick and they are in. No more of the pt getting stuck 3 or 4 times.
    The team is also responsible for all dressing changes on C-lines etc.
  10. by   CHRIS TAYLOR
    I to am an IV Nurse. I am glad that those folks who have responded feel that IV Therapy is invaluable not only to the patient but to the staff nurse as well. Right now in the US, litigations from IV complications are at an all time high. This is an invasive procedure and with the types of drugs we are currently infusing through those lines such things as infection, phlebitis and tissue and muscle damage are rampid.
    We currently have 9 RN's who do PICC insertions, Implanted port accessing, difficult sticks, dressing on the PICC's and Ports as well as education. We also do CVAD repair and decloting.
    We are currently looking into how we can charge for our services and become a revenue generating department.
    I personally would never let anyone but an IV nurse place a line in me due jto the risks involved when someone doesn't realize the problems that can arise from a simple venipuncture.
  11. by   askater
    I work at a large, teaching hospital. The I.V. team starts all I.V's. Except for our unit (stepdown) and the I.C.U's. When we have a hard I.V. start and a couple nurses try. We can call the I.V. nurses. It usually takes them 2-3 hours to get to our unit. And they're very great at I.V. insertion. I wish I was that good.

    When I get pulled. I call the I.V. nurse. And poof there she/he is.

    The last hospital I worked at, we had no I.V. team. There was a MUCH larger use of central lines. Dr.'s were inserting them left and right.
  12. by   acree
    I am the vascular nurse for our 160 bed community hospital. I place 30-40 Midlines or PICCs per month; central line care; difficult sticks and am resource person.

    The Site Rite, ultrasound from Bard, has significantly increased my success rate with Mids & PICCs.
  13. by   timonrn
    We have quite a large IV team and I am thankful for their expertease and wisdom every time I work--their response time is usually less than 1/2 hr unless a trauma is called--I can't imagine a hospital w/o an IV team--This is a 350 plus teaching/trauma hospital. Others from Minnesota hospitals--do you all have IV teams?
  14. by   Chuckie
    .
    Last edit by Chuckie on Jan 18, '03

close