Pay difference between Hospitals and Physicians Office

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    I'm trying to find out some information about how much an R.N. makes working in a physicians office vs. working on a hospital. I'm in my 1st semester now, but I'd like to be well-informed before I enter the workforce, and my wife is an RN working nights on a Med/Surg floor, and is looking to try something else.

    She provides primary financial support for our family now, since, as you all know, it's difficult to work full-time while in nursing school, so I don't earn that much; that said, we can't afford a very drastic pay cut form her salary if she were to get a different job, but nobody EVER talks about pay. How can you make an informed career decision if you are not informed?!?!?!

    If anyone has some info on what RNs are making in physicans offices (like, through Community physician's ofices, or hatever else is out there) these days in Indianapolis or the surrounding areas, I'd love to hear your insight!
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  3. 1 Comments so far...

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    I am thinking MD office is about a $5 to $7 less per hour, but, no doubt, that could vary from one part of Indiana to another, or from one facility to another, is only a guess.



    If that is too much of a cut, maybe your wife would prefer to just investigate switching to another unit within the hospital?? Or maybe a different shift??

    I always found night shift to feel like a sneak preview into early Alzheimers,....

    and I mihgt be odd, but, i found the intense focus on paperwork/computer work/documentation, in a super hectic doctor office, to be just as stressful for me personally, in some ways, as hospital nursing. Maybe if i'd ever experienced a less hectic doctor office, it's different. I spent a ton of time on the phone, while chores were piling up around me, and imo, the nonstop interruptions seemed more than even at a hospital, imo. I'd add, it might be *I* just bite at doctor office nsg, but,
    even the office's BEST nurses there, far better at it than i was, also seemed like they were struggling always against being scattered/uber busy, etc. But, that was a really huge, really busy, multi-doctor office.
    Maybe a smaller quieter one, might be whole other thing.


    I also have always thought, having worked in most every unit you can name, that med/surg is one of THE hardest of all units,
    rivalled only by oncology as harder with all the chemo going on there and dressing changes from science fiction. That just me, but, that's how i see it.

    For real, ICU or ER are easier, imo.

    ICU or ER do require additional knowledge or training or certification in some areas,
    but, still, to ME, having one or 2 patients in ICU,
    or 3 or 4 patients in ER with lotsa backup all around you,
    no matter how machines and orders you have on them,
    is always easier to manage than 6 to 10 med/surg patients.

    You wife might find taking ACLS, and other courses, and trying to get into a specialty unit, might be more satisfying, less draining for her.
    but, of course, everyone is different.


    Another unit, which your wife might find a big change, is IV team. You get to run all over, be in the middle of most everything interesting, and it's different every day.
    Might be something she might consider for a change.


    no doubt, each nurse would have her/his own opinion, but, imo, your wife IS working on THE hardest unit in the whole house, and on the worst shift, as well.
    Last edit by somenurse on Nov 29, '12


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