Calling all HH Nurses, roll call - page 38

Hi, as a newly appointed moderator, I want to live this forum up a bit. I just resigned my position as a HH supervisor, to go back to the field. I have been a nurse 20 years, 17 in critical care,... Read More

  1. by   LuLu2008
    The fact that your company hired you as a field nurse straight out of school is somewhat frightening to me. I hope you never have patients that are too sick, patients whose condition has changed too rapidly, or patients that were inappropriately discharged from an inpatient facility to home-- because otherwise, you are simply fooling yourself at your level of knowledge, and it could be at the expense of a patient. Sorry to sound so ominous but that is how I see it.
  2. by   mah09
    I know HHAs don't usually hire new grads, but I worked with this agency as a student and the owners are alums from my nursing school (RNs). It's a very small agency, so I'm only a phone call away from my supervisor, experienced co-workers, or even the patient's doctor if I'm ever unsure what to do. I'm starting out with relatively healthy patients (post orthopedic surgery) changing dressings, basic assessment, checking vitals and INR. I know enough to recongize anything abnormal and make a phone call. In addition to my twice weekly visits, these patients are also seen by our Physical Therapist 3 times a week. I wont be given more complex patients until I have more experience and training.

    I went to nursing school wanting to do community health, and I'm so happy to be doing home health. I love it!
  3. by   AnnemRN
    Quote from lulu2008
    the fact that your company hired you as a field nurse straight out of school is somewhat frightening to me. i hope you never have patients that are too sick, patients whose condition has changed too rapidly, or patients that were inappropriately discharged from an inpatient facility to home-- because otherwise, you are simply fooling yourself at your level of knowledge, and it could be at the expense of a patient. sorry to sound so ominous but that is how i see it.
    i agree, the hha's i've worked for would never hire a new grad. too many complicated patients - i think it would be too scary for a new grad.

    in fact, we once had an lvn who got her rn after working for our agency for several years. she was told to get 2 years of hospital experience and they would rehire her.
  4. by   AnnaIVNurse
    hello.
    I am new to Home Health and started only a month ago.. But so far I love it! I am on the IV Team caring for patient's piccs and ports. The experience has been so rewarding.
    My only problem has been that I own a SUV so downsizing is in my future
  5. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from AnnaIVNurse
    hello.
    I am new to Home Health and started only a month ago.. But so far I love it! I am on the IV Team caring for patient's piccs and ports. The experience has been so rewarding.
    My only problem has been that I own a SUV so downsizing is in my future
    Take advantage of the "clunker" program - quickly!
  6. by   tinnieboy63
    I agree with the part about if we had the administrative backing. I love my patients but the other things that go on with the paperwork and administration make your job very hard.
  7. by   stacey685
    I did 2 years of medsurg in the hospital (as required post grad) 16yr HH and LOVE it! PPS is for the birds and the new OASIS will surely be a nightmare. I remember when the original came out on paper, then computer programs, now one that should help our performance scores. Anything for an excuse to not pay for a service our patients need so badly. If they don't then obviously it's time to dc. I would rather do oasis then punch a time clock and be inside all day with different patients every shift.
    Welcome to your new post and enjoy weekends!
  8. by   stacey685
    WOW, too bad the clunker program didn't last long. It pays to downsize. You also must look at comfort and features you can't live without. I recently bought a new/used car and when I tried to go down on the car size for the mileage I stayed with a similar car. We (HH staff) spend too much time in our cars, you have to love your car. When I looked at smaller cars like the Ford Fusion-it just didn't have the perks my Pontiac had and definitely not the comfortable seats. Some people can forego one for the other, shop smart. :wlcmggrp:
    Welcome to Homecare!
  9. by   stacey685
    Quote from kaslRN
    Congratulations! Most HH companies do not hire new grads, but I say go for it if you know that is what you want to do! I started in HH as a new grad 2 yrs ago & it has worked out just fine. DON'T be discouraged by more experienced nurses who say you need to work in a hospital first. I learned more by being out on my own and having to rely on my own instincts. I would suggest finding a positive , experienced coworker who doesn't mind answering your "stupid" questions. That helped me gain a ton of knowledge in those first few months.
    As bad as most areas of the country need nurses.. If this is what you want to do then apply. I had a nursing student ride along one day and she really wants to do HH. She was the best student to take out, good luck!
  10. by   tinnieboy63
    I strongly agree with everything you have said. You can make a difference in HH.
  11. by   matokokepa
    HH nurse on a reservation in South Dakota. checking in. anyone else from south or north dakota?
  12. by   RyanSofie
    I was recently recruited for a HH position. The audacity of this company is this :I applied, was hired, went through physical, drug screen , background check (fingerprinting) and orientation and never got a case. That was 6 months ago. Now I am called for a field nurse position full time covering from West to East and North and South . The pay $60,000 for "experienced HH nurses". I am expected to do 30 visits per week, Oasis admits, recerts, discharges and on call . On call cannot triage and must go to client even if an hour or more drive at 2am. Mileage is $.42 per mile. Oasis paperwork must be in within 24 hours. One field nurse would handle all clients. Talk about insanity! All documentation is hand written as there are no laptops. Focus is to prevent hospital admits/readmits on very frail elderly with multiple chronic co-morbidities.I am currently a home health RN and have been in and out of home care for over 12 years. I love it and cannot be confined in an institutional setting. I chose to decline the FT offer for the time being and am doing per diem for them. I may take them up on their offer in a few months as they are relocating near me.
  13. by   lamazeteacher
    Ryan Sophie:

    I started doing HH in L.A., working for 5 different HH agencies, per diem in 1992. It was fascinating, dangerous (due to areas covered), and certainly challenging. Of course the paperwork for each agency differed somewhat, and OASIS is OASIS.

    The only problem was that per diem nurses tend to get cast off cases from case managers, usually because the location was inconvenient, dangerous (projects), and communication difficult. I did see a baby near Disneyland, who was from Viet Nam (no translator), so all communication was with smiles, frowns, and hands. He had a congenital heart disease, post surgical and seemingly had good recuperative ability. They had him in a hammock, which is the norm for their culture, and kept him resting quietly. I've shared that technique with many other parents (much more simple than the expensive accoutrement in our society), and it works.

    Don't count on the agency relocating. I've been told that several times, without it happening. The agency that disappointed you may have lost a contract for many of their cases, hence their silence after hiring you.

    Best wishes for every success.

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