Calling all HH Nurses, roll call - page 16

Hi, as a newly appointed moderator, I want to live this forum up a bit. I just resigned my position as a HH supervisor, to go back to the field. I have been a nurse 20 years, 17 in critical care,... Read More

  1. by   Brita01
    Quote from Hairstylingnurse
      • Chello all, I just wanted to ask some of you private duty nurses what a typical day is like???? I'm currently in home health where I do 5-7 visists a day, and wonder how different private duty is. Does your day go really slow after most of your pt. care is done. Do you give the pt. bath and all other ADL's? Does a cna or pct come to the house,or is it just you all day long? Do u usually have a good relationship with the family? Do u assist OT,PT,ST, when they come visit the pt. How much paper work do u have? I hope for your sake it doesn't compare with home health. I love home health, but want to try as many different area's of nursing as I can. I'm a nurse of 3yrs( this is a second career). So could any of u tell me about your typical day, the pros & cons of private duty? I would be most greatful and let me say what a wonderful website this is. I just found it and haven't even been to any of my other nursing websites since I found this one. Thanx in advance:hatparty:

    I answered a question like this about a month ago, but for some reason I can't copy and paste what I wrote back then. So here is a link to my post in the thread. It's my typical shift in detail. It doesn't answer all your questions because I work nights and have no interaction with therapists. My paperwork consists of MARs, nursing notes, and an equipment cleaning task sheet. The only con I have found is that when you can't work your shift, it's hard to get another nurse to cover because we all have assigned nights. So the mother ends up having to take care of the patient. I hope this link helps you out.
    http://allnurses.com/forums/showpost...9&postcount=14
  2. by   Traveler
    Have just started doing home health. I am overwhelmed and don't that I am getting what I need to know to do the job. The nurse's I am working with are nice, concerned, and knowledgeable. I just feel lost. Any tips on how to do the best job for the clients who will be under my care?(quote)

    Being overwhelmed is normal. barefootlady you wrote your post about 3 weeks ago. I bet it has gotten much better since then. I have done hh for almost 4 years but started a new home health job last week in an area that I know nothing about. I feel comfortable with the visits but don't know many of the patients yet and am not quite comfortable with the agencies requirements for paperwork. My production at this point is low. Remember that at least for the first several months you will feel like you don't know what you're doing half of the time- that is totally normal. On my last job I spent lots of time at first working in the office and asking tons of questions. It will be the same with this new job I'm sure. Someone mentioned how being organized was important- I agree. One problem I'm having with this new job is that it's in a very small rural area. The other nurses in the office have grown up there so they know all of the backroads. Because of this, the directions are awful!!!!! I always try to write directions for a person who has never been to the area before. It can make for a very frustrating day when you run around lost. Added to that, the majority of the coverage area I am in has no cell service. I always try to put: "go 0.4 miles and see school on left, turn right at next road- Shell Ave....." It makes a big difference.
  3. by   Hairstylingnurse
    Hi Traveler, has anyone at your agency,refered you to mapquest? It is wonderful and there are several other similar websites for free. Ofcourse, you may be in a area that is too rural. Just a suggestion and hang in there
  4. by   Hairstylingnurse
    Brita, thanks for such an informative reply on your typical day. Your pt. must sleep off & on al day long. I couldn't imagine being up and down like that all night. But your post has defiantly peeked my interest. I can't find anything on line about private duty nursing.Thanx again
  5. by   Traveler
    Way too rural for MapQuest. I'm just feeling my way along.
  6. by   kelluvanurse
    Hello everyone! I have been a RN for the past 6 years and have spent the last 2 years in Dialysis. Just recently started HH with a clinical supervisor position but it is a very small office and Im the only RN so Im doing the case management part also. I really like it. It is so flexible and fun! But, I do have alot to learn, I did do home health for a very short time shortly after getting out of nursing school but had a very bad experience and decided to try it again due to just could not handle the long hours and stress associated with hospital nursing. I think that I have made a really good decision and I look forward to posting.
  7. by   nurse4Him
    I have been an RN for 11 years and worked in a variety of settings. Home care has been my favourite. I have been a Home Care Nurse (that's what we call it) now for 4 years in a rural town of about 2000 people. We are employed by a regional health authority which is governed by the provincial health ministry. Our cases involve mostly seniors except for the occasional post-op client or a client with a healing wound of some other sort. We mostly change dressings, give monthly vitamin shots and some support care with clients with catheters and colostomies.

    I appreciate the relationships I have been able to build with my clients (/friends). For some of them, the Home Care Staff are sometimes the only people they ever see in a day. So I consider my role to be very important for building value into the lives of each of my clients as I show them that they are important and loved.
  8. by   akcarmean
    I have been in Home Health Care since 2001. I have had only one assignment over that entire time. It has been on patient. I work either 8 or 12 hours shifts. I love it. You get to know the patient and the family. The home I work at the parents have a very casual setting (no need for uniforms). I child has a majority of problems so it is a variety of things to deal with. The child is non-verbal and I can tell by the look on his face what he wants or needs. So of the other nurses on the case and have been there for over a year or more still are unable to realize what he wants, needs, and how to care for him.
  9. by   janetpiano
    [QUOTE=akcarmean]I have been in Home Health Care since 2001. I have had only one assignment over that entire time. It has been on patient. I work either 8 or 12 hours shifts. I love it. You get to know the patient and the family. The home I work at the parents have a very casual setting (no need for uniforms). I child has a majority of problems so it is a variety of things to deal with. The child is non-verbal and I can tell by the look on his face what he wants or needs. So of the other nurses on the case and have been there for over a year or more still are unable to realize what he wants, needs, and how to care for him I appreciate your enjoyment of caring for one patient in a holistic way which includes the family--this is how i feel about the child i care for and her wonderful family--it's a great blessing to be a part of their lives...nursing is truly a wonderful profession to be a part of, isn't it? thanks, j
  10. by   janetpiano
    [QUOTE=akcarmean]I have been in Home Health Care since 2001. I have had only one assignment over that entire time. It has been on patient. I work either 8 or 12 hours shifts. I love it. You get to know the patient and the family. The home I work at the parents have a very casual setting (no need for uniforms). I child has a majority of problems so it is a variety of things to deal with. The child is non-verbal and I can tell by the look on his face what he wants or needs. So of the other nurses on the case and have been there for over a year or more still are unable to realize what he wants, needs, and how to care for him I appreciate your enjoyment of caring for one patient in a holistic way which includes the family--this is how i feel about the child i care for and her wonderful family--it's a great blessing to be a part of their lives...nursing is truly a wonderful profession to be a part of, isn't it? thanks, j
  11. by   nurse_pam
    Hi , I'm a home health care RN working in a small city in Canada. We do IV's (gravity, pump, tpn), feeding tubes, pleurex catheters, complicated wound care including burns, ulcers, lacerations, packings, vac-therapy,debridements; general assessments, ostomy, nephrostomy, g-tubes, pediatrics, etc... We have private companies bid on tender/contract for a term of 3-4 yrs (our government is trying to do away with bidding). The referrals come from hospital to what is called a Community Care Access Center where case managers decide which nursing company gets what patient, and if homemaking (PSW-personal support workers), and / or physio/occupational therapy is needed. Then we get our doctor's orders go in and do our job. I love my job. I love going to Mr. Patient's house , saying hello, talking about current events. One day, one of my patient's told me I was the only one who he had seen, or talked to on the phone all day to. It was sad-because it was Christmas. I hate the way home nurses are treated by hospital staff, doctors (not all, some), and how our own companies take advantage of our good nature. We are paid around $10 an hour less than our fellow hospital nurses , although we do more skills than many of those at hospital. We are more independent than hospital nurses, and when we don't have a something we need we know how to improvise and continue patient safety at the same time. We do tons of paperwork, and first visits are a nightmare which takes over an hour to do the paperwork, and we only get paid for the hour(this doesn't include the hands on care during that visit). We are also not paid our time to do supply orders, discharge summaries, or other "office-time" procedures. We need a union, but when approached, the union tells us it is likely our company would rather close its doors than pay nurses wages that are equal to hospital wages. We use our own cars, and get a small stipend to cover insurance, depreciation, km's, gas, mechanical costs etc... I probably will get out soon. Our contract comes up soon, and I'd hate to leave--I've done this for 5 years. It would be a great job if the politics weren't involved.
  12. by   deborahanne
    Just checking in to say hello.

    I have been in Home Care for 6 years now. I have done Full Time. Part Time, Per Diem Case management, and now works just weekends--That is where the money is now. I am really enjoying having Mon- Fri off!
  13. by   RNTN27
    I have been with this homehealth agency for 3 years, two of which as an LPN. Possibly I have educated myself out of a job I loved! As an LPN I didn't have to do oasis and I was visit pay. Today I am salary, 8-5:00pm and have double the paperwork as a casemanager/visiting nurse, and believe me I work longer than I am getting paid for! Sure the money is much better but, is it worth it? Tomorrow I have 7 patients, out of the 7, three are OASIS visits! I have heard through the grapevine that we are going back to visit pay soon, is that going to be better?
    Thanks for listening!!

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