magnet therapy - page 4

Hi, I'm going for my bsn and we have a alternative health nursing class in which we are to do a presentation on magnet therapy. Does anyone know where you could get some printable literature or get... Read More

  1. Visit  Charlie2} profile page
    0
    I have used magnets for years now and I have no doubt that they work. Personally, I use only the North pole of my magnet. I have three books written by Albert Roy Davis and Walter C. Rawls, The Magnetic Blueprint of Life, The Magnetic Effect and Magnetism and Its Effects on the Living System. If you have an interest in magnetic therapy, you can learn a lot from these books. Morris Tischler, co-developer of the pacemaker, wrote a manual titled, "Biomagnetics in Complementary Medicine". He was a skeptic until he tried magnets for a pinched nerve in his back, while on a trip in South Africa. I'd recommend his manual as well.

    Davis discovered that the two poles of a magnet have two different effects. According to his research, the South pole can cause an increase in pain at an injury site, cause an infection to spread, and actually slow healing. The North pole has the opposite effect. It relieves pain, can eliminate many forms of infections, and reduce the time it takes for an injury to heal. Davis and Rawls even used magnets successfully for burns, blood pressure, blood clots, cataracts, tumors...

    The two researchers state that since the outer fiber covering of the nerves has a positive charged sodium ion, the North pole of the magnet (which is negatively charged) lowers the positive external potential of the outer nerve fiber coating, resulting in a sedated action caused by the lowering of the sensitivity of the nerve. Therefore, the sensation of pain is reduced.
    Last edit by Charlie2 on Oct 18, '07
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  3. Visit  CharlieRN} profile page
    0
    Anecdotal evidence written in a book is still anecdotal evidence. What double blind studies were done and which major, peer reviewed, medical journals were they published in?

    If you need to be a "believer" then we are still talking "woo-woo". No one needs to "believe" in antibiotics for systemic infection or surgery for appendicitis. We have solid proof these treatments work.

    Don't waste our time with pretty theories. Do the rigorous, double blind, studies. Publish the results. After the results clearly prove effectiveness then we can worry about why it works.

    I'd also like some proof of the idea that the north pole of a magnet necessarily carries a negative charge. Static electricity is not the same as magnetism.
  4. Visit  zuzi} profile page
    0
    A lot of researchs in area....try a deep search . Hard to make a scientific study about, with so many variables inside. Talk with an physic scientist before to "fly up to he sky.."
  5. Visit  Charlie2} profile page
    0
    Take a look at the September 1990 issue of the Journal of the National Medical Association, Vol. 82, No. 9. "Evolving Perspectives on the Exposure Risks from Magnetic Fields" is the title of the article. Using human lung carcinoma cells, an experiment was performed to verify the effects of magnetic fields on cancer. When placed in close proximity to the North pole of a 3.5 kilogauss magnet, there was a significant decrease in the growth of the cells between 6 and 144 hours. The South pole produced an increase in the growth of the cells. The article states that this confirms the statement by Davis and Rawls that the growth curve of human lung carcinoma cells increases when exposed to South pole magnetic fields. Additional tissue culture investigations using human lung carcinoma cells and mouse embryo fibroblasts again confirmed these findings.

    The article goes on to illuminate the danger that MRI techs face, since at some institutions, there were strong magnetic fields, both South pole and North pole, detected where staff personnel regularly worked. At two locations, the console of the MRI was found to be getting regular exposure to South pole magnetic fields, and so was a bus stop on Flatbush Avenue, in Brooklyn, since it was on the sidewalk just outside the wall where the MRI was located.
    Last edit by Charlie2 on Oct 5, '07


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