Wow, my blood pressure is kinda high! - page 2

by marilynmom

15,231 Visits | 16 Comments

I'm not asking for medical advice! I've already seen my Dr. I've gained some weight since having my kids (about 20 pounds I need to lose) and am currently slowly losing it by watching what I eat and working out most days of... Read More


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    Quote from indigo girl
    Here is an inexpensive, nonmedical home remedy based on a study at Univ of Chicago where docs studied the Asian custom of using celery to help with this problem. The ingredient in celery (3-n-butyl phthalide) causes the muscles lining the blood vessels to relax, allowing blood to flow more easily, and BP comes down. Eat 4 ounces of celery daily, about one cup chopped. Try this for a week or two. Don't remove the strings as they will remove excess waste material in the bowels (an added bonus). This is also good for joint stiffness, particularly in the knees.

    According to another study (Journal of Ethnopharmacology 99;65(3):2.31-6), hibiscus tea (Hibiscus sabdariffa) will lower BP quickly, but you may have to keep using it. To make it, use a heaping tsp of the dried plant in a quart of boiling water. You can get this from Penn Herb or possibly from Frontier. This is a traditional remedy for HTN in Iran and other countries. The subjects in this study had an average drop of 11.7% in systolic BP and 10.7% in diastolic BP. Drinking flowers sounds rather pleasant.

    I've read in two different articles about the use of lycopene to lower BP as well as to support prostate health. It also has beneficial effects on blood lipids, lipoproteins, and oxidative stress markers. If you can't eat enough tomatoes, you could try Lyc-O-Mato. According to an article in the American Heart Journal this supplement did lower BP in people with mild HTN. It's a tomato extract. The participants in the study took one cap (250 mg) daily for 8 weeks. That would provide 15 mg of lycopene (the amount in 3 ounces of tomato sauce).

    Fish oils also reduce BP naturally as does grape seed extract which also reduces LDL cholesterol levels ( in a recent study done at Univ of Calif, Davis). Three previous studies in animals by the same research team showed that grape seed extract may also prevent atherosclerosis. That would be 300mg daily. The American Heart Association recommends fish oils for all adults at risk for heart disease (most of us?). For correcting HTN, raising HDL, reducing C-reactive protein, lipoprotein A and inflammation, 1000mg per day or more.

    Hope this is helpful. I am positive there are other foods, minerals, and herbs that are useful. Tweety's suggestion about the postassium is right on target also. Good luck.
    Awesome and thanks for typing all that out!! I really appreaciate everyones advice I think I have some grape seed extract so I'll add that in my OJ.
  2. 0
    About the last semester in school, I had my BP checked as a joke.

    It came back 152/90.

    "NO WAY!" thought I.

    I had it measured again 2 weeks later - 146/88 :uhoh21:

    Abouta week before graduation, I went camping. I barely made it half way up a hill before I had to stop - my heart was hammering and my chest felt like it was going to explode. My legs felt like rubber. "Wow!", I told myself, "I'm really outta shape!". [Three years ago, I would have climbed twice that distance, at a greater slope, carrying a 30 lbs pack and ammunition without breakig a sweat].

    I had my BP measured at graduation 148/88


    Three years ago, my BP was 110/75, with a heart rate of 58.

    I swore off chips/snacks/salt, cut down on my alcohol intake, became more serious about quitting smoking, reduced saturated fat and red meat intake and started exercising and weight lifting.

    I don't know what my BP is now. Some of my friends in nsg. school told me that BP was high from stress of school.... well, to me it just means that my heart wasn't in good condition to deal with stress! BP shouldn't be consistently elevated, right?

    Anyways, that was my motivation for losing some weight and getting more exercise - I shouldn't be having BP problems at my age! :imbar :imbar
    Last edit by Roy Fokker on Jul 13, '06
  3. 0
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    About the last semester in school, I had my BP checked as a joke.

    It came back 152/90.

    "NO WAY!" thought I.

    I had it measured again 2 weeks later - 146/88 :uhoh21:

    Abouta week before graduation, I went camping. I barely made it half way up a hill before I had to stop - my heart was hammering and my chest felt like it was going to explode. My legs felt like rubber. "Wow!", I told myself, "I'm really outta shape!". [Three years ago, I would have climbed twice that distance, at a greater slope, carrying a 30 lbs pack and ammunition without breakig a sweat].

    I had my BP measured at graduation 148/88


    Three years ago, my BP was 110/75, with a heart rate of 58.

    I swore off chips/snacks/salt, cut down on my alcohol intake, became more serious about quitting smoking, reduced saturated fat and red meat intake and started exercising and weight lifting.

    I don't know what my BP is now. Some of my friends in nsg. school told me that BP was high from stress of school.... well, to me it just means that my heart wasn't in good condition to deal with stress! BP shouldn't be consistently elevated, right?

    Anyways, that was my motivation for losing some weight and getting more exercise - I shouldn't be having BP problems at my age! :imbar :imbar
    It is kinda scary to see it high isn't it? Good luck on bring yours down, I am doing the same. I plan to get mine checked once a month....maybe you can just check yours, to see your progress, once a month at those free ones in like CVS, Walgreens, Walmart, etc??

    And I agree with you, stress shouldn't make it that high and if it is from stress our hearts are not in very good shape!

    Good luck!
  4. 0
    Keep in mind how much sodium you are taking in, drink penty of water and exercise. I found that swimming laps is the best way for me to keep my BP under control.
  5. 0
    The info given in this thread is very helpful and goes beyond what I've ever been told by my doctor. I intend to put some of it into practice on myself. Thanks to everyone who posted.
  6. 0
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    I don't know what my BP is now. Some of my friends in nsg. school told me that BP was high from stress of school.... well, to me it just means that my heart wasn't in good condition to deal with stress! BP shouldn't be consistently elevated, right?

    Anyways, that was my motivation for losing some weight and getting more exercise - I shouldn't be having BP problems at my age! :imbar :imbar
    I agree with your reasoning. If your circulatory can't handle the stress of school, then you need to be doing something about that.

    However, it concerns me that you "don't know what your BP is now." You have had several readings that were above normal. You should be discussing this with your PCP and getting assessed by a professional. Too many people walk around with mild hypertension for too long, damaging their systems and shortening their lives. BP's should be below 120/80 -- and if yours is above, you should be doing something about it -- before your BP does something bad to you.

    As far as not wanting to take meds goes. If your BP is elevated, then TAKE THE MEDS if you need them. They may prolong your life and/or prevent a stroke that could cause significant disability.

    By all means, make the recommended lifestyle changes. They will minimize your need for meds and may eliminate the need for meds altogether. But you may need to take those meds for a while until the lifestyle changes have a chance to work. In the meantime, don't cause unnecessary damage to your system by not treating your symptoms! You can always discontinue the meds when they are no longer needed.
  7. 0
    You sound like you're doing a lot right already. I have HTN as well, am 28 and in good shape, and eat a healthy,low-sodium, high potassium diet. Both my parents are thin and they both have it as well. I do smoke, although I just got on Chantix to quit. Right now I take two meds for my BP - HCTZ and Norvasc. I'm hopeful that once the quitting smoking is successful I might be able to drop one of them, but for now I stay on them under the advice of my NP. One thing you may want to look into is the DASH diet. Google it, the whole thing's online. It's been shown to reduce BP naturally in most people through pure dietary modifications.


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