New Grads... Is Anyone Addressing The Issue?

  1. 0
    Does anyone know...

    Are any of the universities, community colleges, or nursing departments
    doing anything to help new grad nursing students get jobs here on the islands?

    Is anyone addressing this issue?

    Lisa ;-)

    P.S. If you're new to this forum, and you don't know about the issues new grads face, please don't ask questions in this post. Read the dozen other threads that talk about how new grads can't find jobs. Please DO NOT repost the same questions here. Mahalo!
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  3. 36 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Its too difficult to address at the moment since there are so many cuts and furloughs. Its a tough time. I don't know if universities are doing anything of if they even have the power to influence hospitals or government to hire new grads who are residents of Hawaii. They should give priority to Hawaii residents. I worked around this issue by suffering another two years going to grad school and taking out a loan for the time being while having a part time job to have some income. Also, I live at home. ;p
  5. 0
    what exactly do you expect the universities to do? training new grads is expensive and no one has money to spare right now.

    the faculty at UHM have been very clear in emphasizing the current state of the job market and the importance of making good connections while in school or working anywhere you can to get your foot in the door.
  6. 0
    Mcubed:
    You wrote, "training new grads is expensive and no one has money to spare right now."

    Exactly my point. Does anyone think outside the box?

    I've seen programs on the mainland where student nurses work their final semester training at the facility of their choice. The nursing school has connections with 10 different hospitals. The student chooses one department at one hospital. And, it's not like the student is bounced around, spending 2 weeks on each floor, not really learning how to do one job, and do it well. The student works 20-30-40 hours/week at one facility, working on one floor only, learning, learning, learning about that one department.

    At the end of the semester, the student knows the hospital's rules, knows the doctors and other nurses on one floor, knows the policies and procedures, knows the expectations for that one floor. She finishes the semester, takes her NCLEX, and is usually hired immediately. The charge nurses love it because they know who they're getting.

    It's basically an internship. The student is not paid while learning, so the hospital doesn't pay an hourly wage, doesn't pay a salary, and doesn't pay benefits. It's a transition between school & the work place.

    Is any school doing anything like that? Lemme know. Lisa ;-)
  7. 0
    Quote from Lisa From Maui
    Mcubed:
    You wrote, "training new grads is expensive and no one has money to spare right now."

    Exactly my point. Does anyone think outside the box?

    I've seen programs on the mainland where student nurses work their final semester training at the facility of their choice. The nursing school has connections with 10 different hospitals. The student chooses one department at one hospital. And, it's not like the student is bounced around, spending 2 weeks on each floor, not really learning how to do one job, and do it well. The student works 20-30-40 hours/week at one facility, working on one floor only, learning, learning, learning about that one department.

    At the end of the semester, the student knows the hospital's rules, knows the doctors and other nurses on one floor, knows the policies and procedures, knows the expectations for that one floor. She finishes the semester, takes her NCLEX, and is usually hired immediately. The charge nurses love it because they know who they're getting.

    It's basically an internship. The student is not paid while learning, so the hospital doesn't pay an hourly wage, doesn't pay a salary, and doesn't pay benefits. It's a transition between school & the work place.

    Is any school doing anything like that? Lemme know. Lisa ;-)
    "...and is usually hired immediately."
    What would be the purpose in doing this if there are no jobs available after the "internship"?
    It's a nice learning experience but if there is no job at the end of the rainbow than it is not a "transition." It's just a nice learning experience.
    Valuable in itself, of course, but if the facilities have no jobs to offer there would be no hiring.
    Facilities are slashing costs everywhere they can. Those few that are in the black or at least not drowning in debt have done so by pinching pennies until they scream.
    Even "free" student nurse intern programs (and BTW---any program that I have seen like this DOES pay the SN at least a stipend) have costs associated with them. In this economy hospitals, IMHO, are not going to put even ten cents into anything that won't turn them a profit.
  8. 1
    I have seem an awful pattern of Hawaii medical facilities leaving their own kind behind to hire mainland or travelers first! ***? They should be hung! We need to keep our own and nurture our own, not pay out the #$@ for travelers and transients. Why the heck did we go to school here in Hawaii and get our licenses here for then? This trend is NOT cool
    LetUrLightShineRN likes this.
  9. 0
    I am a nurse wannabe and applied for the KCC program--got alt listed for the upcoming Spring 2010 since I have 2 more classes left to go. In speaking with Wes in July (advisor there at KCC) I specifically asked this question since I already understand the hardships new grads face in attaining employment upon graduation. He said that KCC is in developments with some local hospitals (he declined to say which ones) to work in conjunction with the school in creating additional new grad programs within the next year or two. Although it may not help the grads coming out now, it should assist with those within the next few years. He says he also encourages RN students to take advantage of the career ladder built in to the program, to work as a nurse aide after the first semester, sit for your LPN after 1 year and a semester and try to find employement from there. That would give you a little boost in applying around upon graduation. I am deathly afraid of facing this dilemma that I know already everyone faces. I would hate to find myself with a degree in hand and nothing to do with it. I certainly would never move away from Hawaii.
  10. 0
    "Is anyone addressing this issue?"

    Yes. They are graduating more new grads. And at record rates.

    Actually... on my floor, maybe 1-2 years ago... I had a UH student who was with me practically full time for a semester. Internship. Completely non-paid, I believe.

    Its a great idea, and its been around for quite a while. Just... not every school uses it.
  11. 0
    My only comment at the moment , to new grads, is to really shine during your clinical rotations and get to know nurses. Be professional and network.

    I am a Hawaii resident, am a nurse returning to work after 8 or so years hiatus. I was hired by an agency right away but the census is low ..one week I had four shifts, the next week nothing.

    Decided to get my license back in Arizona so I could have options (and visit family) so I am in Arizona for winter months...their licensing requirements are different than Hawaii so I am going to complete a 160 hour clinical at Mayo clinic. I feel very fortunate to have gotten placed at Mayo. The nurse educator graduated from the same school I did so I think she tried extra hard. I also graduated originally from Arizona and know a handful of people in the profession. Not sure if doing clinical work HERE in AZ will help me get on with one of the hospitals when I get back to Hawaii or not..I'm not even sure if I WANT to do hospital work. But I know Mayo works close with the hospices in the valley and I would like to return to hospice work. Or possibly work agency here in AZ, the company I am employed with staffs in Arizona and Hawaii so I can 'float' .
  12. 0
    getting your foot in the door is also not enough..

    i worked at queens as an aide and hmc as a tech even before nursing school..and i still couldnt land a job in either place..i even applied to nursing homes i.e. ann pearl, oahu care facility, etc. etc. etc...

    but im grateful to find a job in a well known hospital in the mainland..n hopefully i can bring the experience back when i return to HI..

    my advice..pretty much look everywhere n anywhere in the country that is willing to hire new grads..the longer you wait the harder it is to get into a new grad program..also the military is not a bad option..


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