Navy Nurse Questions - page 5

I'm sure this question has been asked more than once, so please bear with me. I've been sifting through all the information I can find, but I still don't quite understand... I've just started... Read More

  1. by   CSHarriganRI
    Duecson,

    I am 1/2 way done with my junior year, so I have one more junior semester and my two senior semesters. No, NCP is financial assistance for students, however, does not specify where you are to spend the money. So logically, some people may use the stipend the received to pay their incurred college expenses, but they could use it for spending money if that were a priority to them. I attend Rhode Island College in Providence.

    Well the next selection board is Wednesday, so that is when I'lll get considered, I am all nerved up.

    CH
  2. by   navynurse06
    working khakis is correct! But don't forget in the areas I listed is where we wear scrubs. So hope for that. I got lucky with peds so I get to hang out in scrubs all day.
    good luck.
    ENS PM
  3. by   kookinitreal
    Quote from navynurse06
    I'm not LCDR Dan but I'll answers some of your questions.
    What will officer training be like?
    Have you looked at the website for OIS? It helps give a pretty good outline of what OIS is like now. I graduated a year ago from OIS so I have the most current experiences r/t OIS. Its 5 Wks (but they were thinking of lower it to 4 wks) in Newport, RI training command. From what the prior enlisted that were in my class said it was pretty similiar to thier bootcamp. You will get yelled at; you have a marine DI as part of your training team. You will get up at the butt crack of down to pt and that's pretty much everyday. You will do everything the way you are told to, when you are told to, and how you are told to. Get the picture? It's no longer fork and knife school or a walk in the park.

    When I am in the Navy, what kind of duty/work will be required of me? Is it like a normal job where I pick my own hours (40 hours a week) or is it 7 days a week, 16 hours each day? What other special requirements/responsiblities being an offier will be expected?
    So when you get to your command you will work 12 hrs shifts. I'm on permanent nights now (due to my own request). So I usually work 3 on 3 off or something similiar. There are some wks I will have to work 4 days a wk but those are rare and the days are spaced out to where it doesn't really feel like I've work more days. You don't pick your own hours; there is a scheduling officer for each ward that makes out the schedule. Of course, you can request days off, request leave, etc. Also, most floors do rotating shifts 2 months days 2 months nights. (all this is based on the hospital I work at NMCSD). On my floor after you have been here for 6 months you can request permanent nights, which I did. I hate day shift and gettting up early. You will in a leadership postion b/c you are an officer. So you will team lead, and eventually be trained for charge nurse (i'm still waiting on that one but my floors a little slow on training people for charge esp. on nights).

    What kind of living environment is it? Will I be given money for living arrangments, base housing? How does that all work? I would like to be at the San Diego hospital but the living costs are much higher than other places, does the money adjust to the living costs of the area or is it one set rate given?
    The living environment vaires based on where you are stationed and what type of housing you live in. I'm in San Diego, married and don't live in base housing. I chose to live near the beach so I pay more for my housing (but there are plenty of areas I could've lived in that were cheaper). Your BAH is adjusted to the area you are stationed in. So depending on what you are looking for it could vary well cover all of your housing. Like I said before I'm married and we had certain things we were looking for in a condo so we pay more and BAH doesn't cover it all. My BAH is (i'm O1) $1677, but that's with a dependant. So it will be less if you are single. And it is increased as you make rank.

    My main interest is Trama. I am currently a nursing assistant/ed tech and also have experience in med/surg and tele. I am also an EMT so I have a passion for the trama aspect. Will I be able to specialize in this right off or will I have to work up to it? With all my background in Trama is it possible that I have a higher priority to become an ER nurse?
    I have the same interest as you. I had 2 yrs of ICU experience as a Tech when I came in. But as I have posted several times before. My tech experience wasn't taken into consideration, so I couldn't go to the ER right off (i'm still trying to get there). AT NMCSD the DNS now wants everyone to work on the floors for 1 yr before they can work in the critical care areas. So even though you have the tech experience you aren't going to get higher priority; you will have to work up to the ER. This used to be different; like when LCDR Dan 1st joined nurses could go straight to the ER (he did) but its not like that now.

    Hope I covered everything. Let me know if I missed anything or if there are holes in my answers.
    ENS PM
    I think you're buttering it up a little.......
  4. by   kookinitreal
    Quote from DanznRN
    Do yourself a favor and do a search on this forum under "Navy" and you will find LOTS of posts on this topic, but I'll give you a brief run down on your questions.

    1.What are the requirements for being accepted?
    Get your BSN, pass the physical, be under 44 years of age (ages over 40 require a waiver I believe), be a US citizen.

    2.What is the minimum length for which you can sign up?
    This changes from time to time, but I think 3 years active and 5 years inactive reserve is the shortest and you get a $25,000 signing bonus right now, I think.

    3.After being accepted, what happens as far as training? (What kind, where do you go, how long etc)
    First stop would be OIS. This is a 5 week crash course on how to be a naval officer. It's great, get up at 0400 for PT work your butt off. learn some basics of the NAvy and get in the best shape of your life....ever!

    4.After training, then what? What kind of setting do you start off in, how long will you be there, and do you get any real choice at this point in where you'll be?
    After OIS, you go to your first duty station, generally a large hospial. You will be presented with a "dream sheet" when you sign up as to where you want to go. Most people end up in Portsmouth, VA, Bethesda, MD or San Diego, CA, that is where the largest naval hospitals are. All except for a few duty stations assignments are for 3 years. The setting you start out in will be determined by the needs of the hospital when you get there, I'm a firm believer in having excperience in the area you want to be in before you get there. Others on here will attest that this doesn't always matter.

    5.What about deployments? How often and how long? Do deployments differ for nurses and if they do, how so?
    Most naval deployments are 6 months to 1 year. How often you get deployed depends on your platform on where you are located some what, but there are no guarantees here. Not sure what you mean by deployments differing for nurses, being away from home is being away from home. If you're looking for specifics, let me know.

    6.What other things do I need to know but I don't know enough to know that I need to know them?
    There are TONS of things, start with what you have above, speak to a Nurse/ Officer recruiter and go from there.

    This should keep the "sucker" factor down, good luck.

    LCDR(s) Dan
    I have a question for you Dan...I've noticed there are people who can't stand the Navy and there are people who love the Navy and I've pretty much narrowed it down to work centers. Where did you go for your first tour of duty? I'm prior service and loved the Navy until I became a nurse. Navy nursing is the worst job I ever imagined.
  5. by   navynurse06
    Kook,
    I'm sorry that you don't like navy nursing. But I wasn't buttering anything up. I gave an honest answer. I love being a navy nurse, even though I had several issues on my floor. But I know that's not how it will always be. I will move on to another area in the hospital and another command eventually.

    So please don't use your bad experiences to generalize navy nursing! Once again I'm sorry that you hate the nurse corps like you do...but maybe it would get better if/when you go to a different area or different command.

    Becoming a Navy nurse is the best thing I've ever done!!! I'm sorry you don't feel that way.

    Off to more ship life....
    ENS PM
  6. by   k6wi
    I am going to be graduating in one year with a BSN and I am considering the Navy Nurse Corps. I have been following this thread and also have some questions. Hopefully, not repeating what's already been discussed.

    For those of you that have civilian and military experience... are there differences in the types of patients and cases you encounter in each setting? If so, what do you like/dislike about each?
    Last edit by k6wi on Jun 5, '07 : Reason: mistype
  7. by   kookinitreal
    Quote from kookinitreal
    I think you're buttering it up a little.......
    Some of what you say is true. However, OIS IS knife and fork school. I've been through bootcamp. I never once had the opportunity to go drinking at the club/downtown or anywhere. Bootcamp you sure as hell have a lot more than one roommate. After being in bootcamp for a month your allowed to drink chocolate milk...which is the best feeling you could imagine.

    No one in my work center is allowed to work perm nights. Furthermore, we all work 4 days a week every other week...and we work every other weekend...we are on call once per week and if they call you in you don't get paid anymore or additional days off. You can take leave, but you will don't work less hours. You're scheduled to work around your leave. You want Mon, Tues, and Wed off? No problem...You'll work Thurs, Fri, Sat, Sun. Most days at work you barely have enough time to pee. There's no time to do any personal stuff. I never heard of a job where I was expected to work 13hrs with no break. We've even have a charge nurse hounding us to hurry up on 30min lunch. People in my work center would love to leave in 1yr. To this day I've never seen/heard of it happening.

    I see you work at NMCSD...you obviously don't work on the med/surg floors.

    Tell the peope who read these threads the truth.

    If you can go to a medium size command do it. Stay there as long as possible. We've had several med/surg nurses come to NMCSD that have all this great med/surg experience. They don't know spit from poop and beg and whine to get off the floor asap. You can't have Lt's and Jg's complaining the work is too hard so they get sent to peds/psych/mother baby - something much easier. And if you do get sent to a big command. Tell the DNS how much you love kids, or how you've always wanted to be a psych or mother/baby nurse. You'll get paid the same and no where near the same amt of work/responsibility. Don't be fooled by the "you need med/surg experience." Most navy nurses run harder from med/surg than they would from the inside of a burning building. NavyNurse06 if you love navy nursing soo much why don't you join us up on the 5th deck...we could sure use your help...I've floated down on your floor. Felt like I was on vacation/had the night off. The only problem was...I knew how more needed I was up on my floor...my coworkers were really suffering.
  8. by   kookinitreal
    Quote from navynurse06
    Kook,
    I'm sorry that you don't like navy nursing. But I wasn't buttering anything up. I gave an honest answer. I love being a navy nurse, even though I had several issues on my floor. But I know that's not how it will always be. I will move on to another area in the hospital and another command eventually.

    So please don't use your bad experiences to generalize navy nursing! Once again I'm sorry that you hate the nurse corps like you do...but maybe it would get better if/when you go to a different area or different command.

    Becoming a Navy nurse is the best thing I've ever done!!! I'm sorry you don't feel that way.

    Off to more ship life....
    ENS PM
    Some of what you say is true. However, OIS IS knife and fork school. I've been through bootcamp. I never once had the opportunity to go drinking at the club/downtown or anywhere. Bootcamp you sure as hell have a lot more than one roommate. After being in bootcamp for a month your allowed to drink chocolate milk...which is the best feeling you could imagine.

    No one in my work center is allowed to work perm nights. Furthermore, we all work 4 days a week every other week...and we work every other weekend...we are on call once per week and if they call you in you don't get paid anymore or additional days off. You can take leave, but you will don't work less hours. You're scheduled to work around your leave. You want Mon, Tues, and Wed off? No problem...You'll work Thurs, Fri, Sat, Sun. Most days at work you barely have enough time to pee. There's no time to do any personal stuff. I never heard of a job where I was expected to work 13hrs with no break. We've even have a charge nurse hounding us to hurry up on 30min lunch. People in my work center would love to leave in 1yr. To this day I've never seen/heard of it happening.

    I see you work at NMCSD...you obviously don't work on the med/surg floors.

    Tell the peope who read these threads the truth.

    If you can go to a medium size command do it. Stay there as long as possible. We've had several med/surg nurses come to NMCSD that have all this great med/surg experience. They don't know spit from poop and beg and whine to get off the floor asap. You can't have Lt's and Jg's complaining the work is too hard so they get sent to peds/psych/mother baby - something much easier. And if you do get sent to a big command. Tell the DNS how much you love kids, or how you've always wanted to be a psych or mother/baby nurse. You'll get paid the same and no where near the same amt of work/responsibility. Don't be fooled by the "you need med/surg experience." Most navy nurses run harder from med/surg than they would from the inside of a burning building. NavyNurse06 if you love navy nursing soo much why don't you join us up on the 5th deck...we could sure use your help...I've floated down on your floor. Felt like I was on vacation/had the night off. The only problem was...I knew how more needed I was up on my floor...my coworkers were really suffering.
  9. by   DanznRN
    Kookinitreal-

    Since you have not offered your rank I have o clue when you went to OIS, my wife went in 2003 and it was no knife and fork school. It was when I went in 1997, but things have changed. The experience is more closelyt matched with that of boot camp, no, they are not the same in the least. you have to keep in mind that a teenager out of high school requires a different structure than an adult who has just spent 4,5, or 8 years in a university.

    As for work stations, I'm all ER/ Trauma/ ICU. Started there in NMCSD in 1997 in the ER, went to Great Lakes in the ICU, then to Sigonella, Italy to the ER. I agree that people in the Med/ Surg floors have it rough, as for the schedule, I worked the same as you. I had every other weekend off or worked every other weekend, depends on your perception. As far as call, been there done that too and I didn't get paid extra for it. Alos have done the NOD too. Have you ever been a civilian nurse? I got in 2002 for 11 months because I thought the grass was greener, trust me it wasn't. My wife was a civilian nurse before she came in the Navy and she had the same requirements of being on call. I don't doubt you're overworked, we all are, just read an article in the paper about how overworked the military nurses are, it's a tough time right now. I've been where you are at, contrary to your belief, the specialty areas require as much work if not more. No I never had 20 patients to pass meds on or assess, but the mental demands of the specialty areas can be quite high.

    I too am sorry your having a bad experience there, it happens, I've had them everywhere I went, including the civilian world. Having stuck it out and been in 10+ years, now in DUINS it's starting to pay off. I put on LCDR in August and life has never been so good. I met with a CAPT the other day whose been in for 33 years and still likes it, actually both him and his wife have been in, her for 26 years. Once you pay your dues you start to get the rewards and the yearly raise, promotions, and other benfits don't hurt either.

    As for time to do personal stuff at work, never heard of that, that's why it's called work, not personal time. you may have a time management problem there. As for the charge nurse hounding, they obviously don't recognize the need for you all to have your full 30min. for lunch, you need the break. That's just poor management on his/ her part and probably a lack of willingness to cover your patients, but that's a guess.

    LCDR(s) Dan
  10. by   navynurse06
    I'm don't understand why you feel the need to attacked me, but if that makes you feel better about your situation go right ahead.
    I've always told everyone on here that I work in Peds. I've never said I worked in med/surg. So I dont' understand where you are getting that I'm not telling people the truth on here.
    I know I don't work as hard as you guys up there on the 5th deck; I've never claimed to. My job pretty easy compared to what you is I"m sure. But I didnt' ask for peds when I came it; I didn't want to go there b/c it was easy. I was told that would be a good path to the ER so I took it. You just could have easliy been put in the areas that you talk down about just as I could have been put on the 5th deck. That was just how the cards were dealt.
    Also, I'm deployed with many people who work on th 5th deck that aren't as bitter about navy nursing as you are!
    ENS PM
  11. by   CSHarriganRI
    Much of the topics your complaining about kook are present in the private sector as well. In all of my clinical rotations nurses are few and far between, resulting in an increase of workload, stress, and decreased efficiency of nursing care. Although you are experiencing these in the Navy, and may not be receiving comparable pay for this, there are many other benefits that you receive that you aren't considering.

    I am not a Navy Nurse, however, I plan on becoming one... and I think before you trash what you have you should better analyze the situation of your peers.

    CH
  12. by   navyspouse
    I just wanted to make a quick comment. I'm currently a 44 year old Navy Spouse who is going back to school for a second degree in nursing. My DH is still active duty, will retire Oct '08 with more than 30 years of enlisted service. He is a corpsman and we have been stationed at every Naval hospital on the east coast, plus a majority of all the branch health clinics and the Comfort at one point or another. I have the utmost respect for everyone that works in one of these fine establishments. I just wanted to say to those of you who are thinking about joining the Navy or military, just make sure your doing it for the right reasons. Having been in the Navy this long, and yes I can say that, you either like it or you won't, there is no in between. I have made the sacrafices of my DH being deployed for 3 months, 6 months, and as recent as 14 months to Afghanistan, in the end what it all boils down to is you are the one to make it what it is. Just the same as working in the civy world. I'm truly going to miss active duty, I'll miss when that 2-3 year period comes and I can say ok what are our choices of where we're going, I'll miss the commroderie that only seems to be in a military family, I'll miss alot. But I can say thank god we live in a Navy town and are close to our Navy friends!
    Kudos to each one of you and Thank You for Your Service!~
  13. by   navynurse06
    Well said Navyspouse! And thank you for your post!!!

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