FY 2012 Air Force Medical Programs Statement

  1. 1
    fy 2012 air force medical programs statement presented by maj. gen kimberly siniscalchi
    from april 6, 2011 to the senate appropriations committee


    http://appropriations.senate.gov/ht-...3-06b0daff3a35


    highlights about force development:

    our nurse transition program (ntp) continues to be an integral component in developing our new nurses. we graduated 212 nurses in fiscal year (fy) 2010 from eight military and two civilian locations. in december 2010, we graduated the third class from scottsdale healthcare system in arizona. this outstanding civilian program has produced 56 nurses since its inception.

    due to the resounding success of this military-civilian collaboration, we decided to consolidate resources and create four ntp centers of excellence. a civilian magnet facility, tampa general hospital, florida, was recently approved as one of these sites and the training agreement was signed 24 february 2011. the remaining three centers of excellence will be in scottsdale, arizona; san antonio, texas; and cincinnati, ohio; and will provide our new nurses with the experiences so crucial to their professional development.


    highlights about force management:

    the goal of force management is to design, develop, and resource the air force nurse corps to sustain a world-class healthcare force in support of our national security strategy and align our inventory and requirements by specialty and grade. we must have the right number of people to accomplish the mission. in fy 2010, we recruited 170 fully qualified nurses and selected 126 new nursing graduates exceeding our recruiting goal of 290. in line with initiatives to decrease air force end-strength, nurse corps recruiting service goals were reduced in 2011. as we face force shaping initiatives, it is critical that we continue to develop programs that provide the clinical ability essential to the sustainment of our nursing force.


    for those interested in getting a commission, here are the previous years recruiting numbers:
    previous af recruiting:

    fy 2011
    goal 290
    ntp: 126
    fq: 170
    total: 296

    fy 2010
    goal: ?
    ntp: ?
    fq: ?
    total: ?

    fy 2009
    goal: 350
    ntp: 158
    fq: 126
    total: 284
    retired: 267

    fy 2008

    goal: 325

    ntp: 169

    fq: 133

    total: 302

    retired: ?
    just_cause likes this.
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 3,726 Views
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 12 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Thanks for this Iowa!
  6. 0
    Tampa might sound enticing, but I'd caution a new grad going to NTP to stay with an Active Duty military NTP if at all possible. Working at Tampa General getting your feet wet, then going on to WHMC or similar will be culture shock.

    Why not take advantage of picking your AD Officer preceptors brain about all aspects of nursing while you have all of that one-on-one training time. To do it in Tampa General seems a waste of precious opportunity.
  7. 0
    Quote from CRF250Xpert
    Tampa might sound enticing, but I'd caution a new grad going to NTP to stay with an Active Duty military NTP if at all possible. Working at Tampa General getting your feet wet, then going on to WHMC or similar will be culture shock.

    Why not take advantage of picking your AD Officer preceptors brain about all aspects of nursing while you have all of that one-on-one training time. To do it in Tampa General seems a waste of precious opportunity.
    Going to WHMC maybe a good training site for NTP, but way too many new AF nurses that go through a military NTP program are nowhere near their civilian counterparts in a busy mid to large size civilian hospital. I am guessing that nursing leadership is realizing that civilian hospitals can do a better job of providing initial training for our new nurses. Most AF hospitals are relatively small and can't provide the depth or number of experiences that medium to large civilian hospitals can and do.
  8. 0
    WTB,
    You bring up a good point. I never went to NTP, as I came in with experience, but I see the pitfalls of smaller bases. I forgot I was at a smaller base where the 2LT was in charge of the “med surg” floor (a couple of beds really) and the new 2LTs. I’ve never worked med surg, but since new nurses really should start there – your point is well made.
    Perhaps we should get them immersed in busy, heavy load, time constrained, and sink or swim situations like those in big busy places before we send them off to a small base with no room for skills building and where the expectation will be to have all of that time management down upon arrival.
  9. 0
    I had my chief nurse interview at WPAFB which I was told was one of their biggest medical centers which the exception of WHMC and a couple of others. It was not near as busy as some premier large civilian hospitals I have had the opportunity of doing clinical rotations at. This does not mean that WPAFB was not as advanced. This medical center had all of the modern technology and more than most civilian hospitals with their units and state of the art simulation labs. I will agree that a large civilian hospital may provide more opportunities and more experiences for us coming into the nursing field. However, I feel I would still enjoy more one on one time with a preceptor at an AD hospital and would benefit from learning about military life from AD nurses. This sounds like a great way to expand the program though and train more nurses.
  10. 1
    Quote from CRF250Xpert
    Tampa might sound enticing, but I'd caution a new grad going to NTP to stay with an Active Duty military NTP if at all possible. Working at Tampa General getting your feet wet, then going on to WHMC or similar will be culture shock.

    Why not take advantage of picking your AD Officer preceptors brain about all aspects of nursing while you have all of that one-on-one training time. To do it in Tampa General seems a waste of precious opportunity.


    As a Dec 2010 graduate of the NTP program, I must admit that I fully enjoyed my time in a civilian location. The experiences that I was able to gain theire as opposed to what my cohorts were able to get at an MTF are not comparable. Civilian locations you are able to complete your "checklists" much faster and see much more such as trauma.

    I will concede that being in a civilian facitily you do not get the comradery and leadership guidance that one could gain at a MTF. However, having said that, I would not change the fact that I was at a civilian site to go to a MTF. In fact, I would encourage everyone to complete their NTP at a civilian site.



    luvbug080688
    wtbcrna likes this.
  11. 0
    Quote from laneyg
    However, I feel I would still enjoy more one on one time with a preceptor at an AD hospital and would benefit from learning about military life from AD nurses. This sounds like a great way to expand the program though and train more nurses.
    When it comes down to it which one is going to offer better training for deployment a large civilian facility with lots of opportunities or small AF hospital.

    WPAFB is a nice hospital with lots of trainees/residents and SRNAs. The residents and SRNAs do the majority of their training downtown at civilian hospitals.

    Also, don't forget NTP is just the beginning you will still have orientation and inprocessing 4-8+wks to go through once you get to you permanent duty station. You will have plenty of orientation time at your new base to get to spend with a military preceptor.
  12. 0
    Hi luvbug,
    I've noticed that you are stationed overseas at Lakenheath. How do you like it? I put England down as my top choice and am still waiting to hear. I wanted an insiders view as to what life was as a new nurse overseas Thanks in advance xx
  13. 0
    Hi luvbug,
    I've noticed that you are stationed overseas at Lakenheath. How do you like it? I put England down as my top choice and am still waiting to hear. I wanted an insiders view as to what life was as a new nurse overseas Thanks in advance xx


Top