Becoming an R.N. in the Airforce?

  1. Hi, I was wondering if someone could give me some information on becoming an R.N. in the Airforce? I heard the Airforce is the program to be for Nursing? I was just wondering about it going through the schooling to become an R.N. in the Airforce and them paying for it. Thank you.
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   ayndim
    Quote from WalkingInTheRain
    Hi, I was wondering if someone could give me some information on becoming an R.N. in the Airforce? I heard the Airforce is the program to be for Nursing? I was just wondering about it going through the schooling to become an R.N. in the Airforce and them paying for it. Thank you.
    Call your local recruiter. The numbe should be listed in the govt pages of your phone book. I personally like the Navy but then again I was in the Navy. Better uniforms (IMHO) and you get to see more places.
  4. by   armyrn
    go to the website www.airforce.mil or contact your local recruiter. be firm with what you want because recruiters will try to talk you into doing what they need! (they have quotas to fill). if you just want to go military, talk to the army too. they are very short nurses right now. i'd go air force as a first choice though. (and i am, starting this september). good luck!
  5. by   AFRescuemedic
    I wouldn't go into the AF with the intent of them putting you through school. I don't know of a program like that. The AF has just adopted LPN's with the RN shortage and will put you through the school if you can compete against 100+ other people who are going to apply for the limited slots.
    Another caveat, RN's in the AF have VERY little practical experince in pateint care. The AF is made up of clinics and "super-clinics" with only a few hospitals in existance anymore. Don't go in expecting to become proficient in patient care techniques. AF medics and RN's are administrators and clerks and "farm out" sick people "downtown" You will become a licensed NREMT-Basic when you get out of technical school and ,we in AFSOC, are Paramedics with much more specific and individualized training.
  6. by   armyrn
    i got picked up by a USAF recruiter who was actually at my hospital working on a CRNA who made the switch. there is a lot of paperwork but the process is not that difficult (going from army to air force).
  7. by   miloisstinky
    I say go for it! I did 4 years as an ICU RN and had a BLAST!! I went from florida to northern california to las vegas, met a ton of people...great experience for me. Do your research. Realize that if you go in as a specialized nurse (ICU ER OR) you will be locked in to that area and it is difficult to change at times. Also, if you want to go in as an ICU nurse for example, i believe you need to do atleast a year in a civilian ICU. They were really hurting for nurses (still are) and I literally got to choose my first assignment. Your civilian years divided by 2 are contributed to your time in, and being an officer has its privelages!!!! They do have a loan payback program (i believe 25 thousand) in exchange for an additional 2 years, also you can join the AF reserve when you are getting your BSN, and i think that pays for it too. Its easier than civilian nursing....not as stressful (for me anyway) But like every job...its still a job, even the greatest job has its issues.They are REALLY BIG on education. I would still be in, but i met my husband and our career fields were incompatible to be moved together, so he stayed in and i got out.......good luck, life is short, have fun!!
  8. by   JakeT
    I am currently looking at going into the US Air Force Reserve as a critical care nurse. I just finished with my MEPS physical and my reserve recruiter is putting the final paperwork together. It just seems to take a long time to get everything processed and the the i's dotted and the t's crossed. What is nice is that I have just started to apply to CRNA schools and with the Reserves I can go inactive and collected a monthly stipend while in school.
  9. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from rpbear
    You can PM me if you wish. I am an Air Force Nurse Recruiter and can give you the scoop on the whole deal. Contrary to popular opinion we do not get a bonus for signing a nurse up and we do not have a quota. We do not even select the nurse to enter. If a nurse wishes to apply then thay can... through a recruiter. We are now a days nothing more than admistrative clerks that build your package to meet a selection board. Your actual package will be reviewed by a panel of 3 Lt. Colonel Nurses (high ranking) and they choose if you are eligible. The Air Force tells us each year how many nurses they are hiring and we are given a "target" to recruit towards. It is not up to us if you get selected.

    As for the one person's comments about clinics or super clinics, we do have major facilities and there are many education programs to advance to CRNA or many of our NP programs. Because the CRNA and NP programs are considered hard to recruit, we "grow our own", pay for your school, while you still collect a paycheck. As your local recruiter about the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT).

    As for the people that do not know the entire program and ONLY know a fraction of it from their experience at the few bases they have been stationed at... your opinions are noted. Leave the facts to the professional recruiters, we do not tell you all how to do your job or the particulars involved with it. We attend extensive training in many areas which involves many TDYs to many Air Force Bases across the globe so we can get a good idea of differences throughout the Air Force.
    What's the age limit for nurses to enter AF? How is it for NICU nurses in the AF? You wouldn't make us do big people would you?
  10. by   JakeT
    The information I received from a AF Health Occupations Recruiter stated that you must be less than 47 years of age to enter. The AFSC(Air Force Specialty Code) for a NICU Nurse is 46N3F (neonatal intenisve care unit nurse)





  11. by   zman
    Though the military does have some excellent benefits for education, you when considering whether to go active duty or reserves (which includes the Air National Guard), there is quite a bit to consider. While active duty service makes you eligible for tuition reimbursement of courses that you take, understand that you will be working 40+ hours a week, probably on a varied schedule. Once you are done with your service, though, the GI Bill (and the fact that you will be considered 'independent' for financial aid purposes (which otherwise requires you to be 26yrs old, married, an emancipated minor, etc) provides quite an advantage over a civilian.

    Long story short, consider all parts of the Air Force: Active, Reserves, and Guard.

    With all deference to AFRescueMedic, I disagree on the subject of hands-on patient care in the AF. With the current level of deployments, all company grade officer (Lieutenants and Captains) RNs, with VERY FEW exceptions, are now on notice that they will be practicing nursing in a forward area, which is very much hands-on.

    I work in an ICU in San Antonio and can personally attest to the level of hands-on care that I perform daily. In over 5 years of AF nursing experience, I have been hands-on, working shifts, for all but about 3 months of the time. 2 Years med-surg, 1 year ER, and now going on 2 years ICU. Though most of our bases have downsized their clinics, the staff from the Super Clinics are sent here to attend trauma training and refresher in preparation for deployment.

    We may have our share of 'clipboard nurses', but that won't be a concern for anyone until they have been in for several years...
  12. by   AFRescuemedic
    Quote from zman

    With all deference to AFRescueMedic, I disagree on the subject of hands-on patient care in the AF. With the current level of deployments, all company grade officer (Lieutenants and Captains) RNs, with VERY FEW exceptions, are now on notice that they will be practicing nursing in a forward area, which is very much hands-on.
    Though most of our bases have downsized their clinics, the staff from the Super Clinics are sent here to attend trauma training and refresher in preparation for deployment.

    We may have our share of 'clipboard nurses', but that won't be a concern for anyone until they have been in for several years...
    Zman,
    My point being that Wilford Hall is the exception - not the rule in active duty. Most AF bases are supported by clinics and, compared to ten or even twenty years ago, there are very few in-patient beds in the AF - I know I've been in 25 years this last May. As you stated above, RN's are on notice "now" that they will be involved in practical nursing albiet state-side or not. "Now" is the operative word. My point is that for someone to come in the AF to seek solid hands-on experience in nursing may not be the best choice. I'm just trying to paint a realistic picture for someone who may only be getting their info from a recruiter - not the best source of practical information.

    JS
  13. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from JakeT
    The information I received from a AF Health Occupations Recruiter stated that you must be less than 47 years of age to enter. The AFSC(Air Force Specialty Code) for a NICU Nurse is 46N3F (neonatal intenisve care unit nurse)





    Cool - thanks for the info!
    Always best to know what options are out there.
    Do you know if they have NNPs as well? I would imagine they would, since they have NICUs, but I've never seen them recruiting for NNPs.
  14. by   carolinef
    Hello all, so glad there is something like this online for people in my situation! Thanks in advance for the comments. Here's my situation, if anyone has any advice I would appreciate it. Single mother (with lots of familial support), bachelor's in Spanish (bilingual), looking into nursing (found a BSN program for 36K, 1.5 yrs), and want to join the AF. Question is: Do school first? (lotsa loans) or Join AF and then get trained? no idea the steps to take first...thanks!

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