Air Force medic vs Navy Medic? - page 2

Does anyone know who has a better prgram?... Read More

  1. by   RNSuzq1
    Paul,

    If your brother is serious about this, definitely try to find a military site on the net where you might talk to Navy Doc's. Better yet, call your nearest Naval Hospital, see if he can set up an appt. with one of their younger Doc's - just tell them you'd like to discuss the Navy Med. Corps with them, I'm sure they'll gladly talk to you.

    As a Corpsman, I worked with tons of MD's. Some loved the Navy, made it their career, worked their way through the ranks, ended as Command Captains, etc. Most, just stayed in long enough to pay the Navy back for Medical School, then went into private practice. You don't pay it in money, it's paid with time served. Not sure what it is now, but I think they used to make them stay in about 6 years. Your Brother will get a fantastic Medical Education in the Navy, but since they spend a fortune to educate/train people, just trust me, they get out of you what they put in.

    If anyone is contemplating joining the Military, don't ever assume you'll end up in some nice safe place. If there's a War, Doc's, Nurses, Corpsman go where the injured are to treat them - there's Navy hospitals all over the World, so no guarantee where you might end up. Whatever you decide, remember, verbal agreements are worth nothing in the military, you have to get everything promised to you in Writing... Hope this helps...
  2. by   NYNavyMom
    The job of a Navy Corpsman was a complete mystery to me when my son joined the Navy. I figured it was just an EMT type of position or a basic CNA. After completing his schooling at Great Lakes, I saw the material he studied and learned. The schooling is far more intense than any RN program in NY State. I remember after a 10 mile PT run he arrived back to be told they had mass casualties that needed immediate attention. This was basically a battlefield with dummies that breath/bleed etc..(closest thing to a human body you will find). The Corpsman had to evaluate each one and determine which could be saved then triage them and call in medivac. My son continued onto Dental assistant schooling after the basic corpsman school. He now administers shots, helps set broken bones, sutures wounds, works in an emergency dept as the medic on call for accidents, does rounds in the Navy Hospital, he has run anger management programs, and also helps in the dental clinic to assist in everything from teeth cleaning to orthodontics. He had to sign a 5 yr commitment to get this training. He loves his job and would like to continue after he serves his commitment. Under NY Law he is not qualified to perform any medical job without returning to school. I want to press our Governor and Senators to review all jobs performed in all branches of the military and give these young men and woman the state certification to work as a Dental Assistant, RN, or any other job that they have been performing. This is a viable workforce that is being overlooked. Many of my friends are RN's and have commented that these corpsman are performing jobs that in the civilian world in many cases would only be performed by a Physicians Assistant or Dr. I see no need to make these men and woman return to 2 yrs of college to learn English and History interspersed with medical knowledge they already have. When these young men and women are sent to war they are responsible for the welfare and lives of a platoon of marines. They carry each marines medical history and must make sure that their immunizations are up to date and are referred to as "Doc" by the marines. They are the only health care provider available to these marines. They are the first to treat critical wounds and are a marines lifeline. My point is I want everyone to write to your states Governor and Senators and implore them to change laws to help these men and women maintain the positions in civilian life that they have been doing in the military.
  3. by   lifeafter40
    Quote from NYNavyMom
    The job of a Navy Corpsman was a complete mystery to me when my son joined the Navy. I figured it was just an EMT type of position or a basic CNA. After completing his schooling at Great Lakes, I saw the material he studied and learned. The schooling is far more intense than any RN program in NY State. I remember after a 10 mile PT run he arrived back to be told they had mass casualties that needed immediate attention. This was basically a battlefield with dummies that breath/bleed etc..(closest thing to a human body you will find). The Corpsman had to evaluate each one and determine which could be saved then triage them and call in medivac. My son continued onto Dental assistant schooling after the basic corpsman school. He now administers shots, helps set broken bones, sutures wounds, works in an emergency dept as the medic on call for accidents, does rounds in the Navy Hospital, he has run anger management programs, and also helps in the dental clinic to assist in everything from teeth cleaning to orthodontics. He had to sign a 5 yr commitment to get this training. He loves his job and would like to continue after he serves his commitment. Under NY Law he is not qualified to perform any medical job without returning to school. I want to press our Governor and Senators to review all jobs performed in all branches of the military and give these young men and woman the state certification to work as a Dental Assistant, RN, or any other job that they have been performing. This is a viable workforce that is being overlooked. Many of my friends are RN's and have commented that these corpsman are performing jobs that in the civilian world in many cases would only be performed by a Physicians Assistant or Dr. I see no need to make these men and woman return to 2 yrs of college to learn English and History interspersed with medical knowledge they already have. When these young men and women are sent to war they are responsible for the welfare and lives of a platoon of marines. They carry each marines medical history and must make sure that their immunizations are up to date and are referred to as "Doc" by the marines. They are the only health care provider available to these marines. They are the first to treat critical wounds and are a marines lifeline. My point is I want everyone to write to your states Governor and Senators and implore them to change laws to help these men and women maintain the positions in civilian life that they have been doing in the military.
    You make some very good points in your post, and I know from my experience as an Army Aviation Mechanic the frustration of not being "qualified" to perform the civilian equivalent of the job you have been doing for years.

    Now I am just talking here, but this sounds a lot like the Pentagon's reasoning for not wanting higher GI Bill benefits... if they offered civilian certification for your job, then more people would get out of the military and take their training with them...
    S
  4. by   DragonDoc
    I found everyone's post to be very amusing. The bottom line is that every branch trains their medical eprsonnel to handle the mission that they will face. Navy Corpsman training closely mirrors Army medic training in that they have a ground force mission. The Air Force has a ground mission but they don't have to worry about sending their medics outside the wire unless they are Spec. Ops. or covering an EOD team. There are situations where Navy and Air Force personnel might find themselves in a remote environment where they must care for their comrades without the benefit of having a Doctor around. The AF and Navy indentified this requirement and developed schools to handle it. The Army has medics in the same situation. However, there isn't a service school to prepare the Army medic for indepedent duty. Army medics are taught the bulk of their advanced skills by the PA, Physicians, and medical NCOs in the units to which they are assigned. The results from this approach go from stellar to disatrous depending on the knowledge, teaching skill, and motivation of the Sr. medical personnel in a unit. The Army's basic medical course is trauma heavy (Amry medics are 68W and must be EMT-Basic at a minimum ro be a medic) and teaches the young medic everything they need to know to treat casualties on the battlefield. I have seen Army medics successfully treat casualties with multiple blast and gunshot wounds one month after completing their training. These soldiers performed like veterans even though they where faced with real world casualties on their first mission outside the wire. The funny thing is that you all seem to be done on Army medical training but Congress and DoD decided to send all Sailors, Airmen, and soldiers to Fort Sam Houston to train to become medics. Fort Sam Houston is the Home of the Army Medical Corps and the Army Medical Department Center & School. Most of the svhools at Sam are already Tri-Service to include the PA program (Coasties also attend this course). So by 2011 all medical personnel will be trained in one spot by NCOs from the three branches and all will meet the same standards. Even better news for future military medics is that the Air Force's standard of training call for college credit for the course during training. That will make easier for everyone to get their degree.
  5. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    I can't comment on the training.

    However, as a former Marine I can tell you that I hold the Navy corpsmen in the highest regard, much more so than the USAF medics. The reason has nothing to do with skill or training and everything to do with the cajones that it takes to be the guy with the medical kit and the responsibility to treat the fallen Marines. Enemy snipers place a high value on the corpsmen. Their Marines place an even higher value on them.
    Last edit by ♪♫ in my ♥ on Jul 14, '08 : Reason: Changed "corpsman" to "corpsmen"
  6. by   RNSuzq1
    [QUOTE=♪♫ in my ♥;2966602]

    Hi, Thanks for the kind words. As a former female Navy Corpsman, I wasn't allowed out in the field, but I did spend most of my 6 years on active duty working with Marines. A couple of of those years were in SC treating sick Marine Recruits on Parris Island. When I was stationed in Norfolk, there was an entire barracks of Marines next to our 1 female barracks of Navy women. They were the nicest bunch of guys, they kept an eye out for us when we were coming back from duty late at night, we just always felt safe with them around. Just wanted to let you know the Corpsman appreciated the Marines always watching our backs.
  7. by   samantha11
    I was an air force medic. The responsibilities were very close to a civilian RN. You get training for EMT and triage, first aid. I got training and did suturing, casting, injections, assisting in surgical procedures. blood draws,autoclaving instruments, packing surgical instruments. Vaccinations ,lots of nursing details. In fact our nurses on our base were basically hands off. They did QA and paperwork. Actually I did the paperwork, typed all the reports. I worked in an office for a time, scheduling appointments assisting docs etc.. I drove an ambulance and did ground transport of patients in Germany. Mass casualty exercises. It's super diverse depending on your base. Larger hospitals medics would act as a nurses aide capacity. One downfall is that your EMT training won't transfer over, at least in my case, I would have had to start all over again with approved courses for work for the fire department. Their loss LOL.. My favorite assignment was a small base, varied my job a lot more.
    I got my RN, tried to go back in but I had just had a baby. Was over their weight restriction by 28 pounds. Still have them LOL!!
  8. by   navvet
    Yes, Hosp Corpman, will probably in some form or fashion, at one point in their tours/careers handle a number of clinical practices that CNAs, Med Tech, RNs/LPNs, and PAs all perform on a daily basis. I feel writing your state legislature or Gov. Will not do a bit of good. Although, I have read somewhere that Cali. allowed those in the health care ratings with adv. NECs/MOS's (all branches) can challenge the LVN State Board. But, it boils down to MONEY, MONEY, MONEY. Politics are strongly invovled in those who make the decisions. Think for a moment.
    If I could join the military for 4 years as a Hosp Corpman, then walk out and get a job paying $25.00 an hour as an RN. Why would their be a need for CNA,MA LPN, RN,BSN,MSN, RT,PT,PTA, of study in our Nations CC and Univ. Yes the Military will train you for a Job ---to do IN the military. The only enlisted profession that I know of in the Navy, that one could litterly walk out of the military and not have a 2/4 year degree in that profession and get a well paying job, is the Navy's Nuclear program.
    Sure, come join the N.A.V.Y. (Never Agian Volunteer Yourself) we have many job selections all of these may POSSIBLY carry over into a civilian career. "You have a bright future, in the United States Navy".
    I would not trade my time in the Navy for anyting. I've been to 12 different countries and had great liberty in all of them. It paid for my Bachelors degree. But, life is not about a piece of paper one holds. It is the experience and journey one goes through. Live life to the fullest.

    Time Enough for Love_ by Robert A. Heinlein.
    "A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.
    Specialization is for insects."
    </SPAN>
  9. by   P-medic2RN
    i was an air force medic and independent duty medical tech..(20 yrs) the navy has the better training program hands down. esp. if you go to the independent duty corpsman school. good luck to you.
  10. by   AF IDMT
    I was an Air Force IDMT and I personally believe the Navy training might be a tad better. I was stationed at Shemya for a year and we diagnosed and prescribed meds gave shots, took x-rays, did cast, sutured wounds. OH yes and on Saturday I washed the Cracker Box. OH yes they also taught us how to check a prostrate? Never did that though! ) But prior to going to IDMT school i was a surgical tech and I also Flew Areovac. So I was well versed in the medical field. Navy is good But the Air Force.. you won't have to go in the field with the Marines unless you want too!
  11. by   Mike W.
    I am a retired AF Medic, 13 years as an Independent Medical Duty Tech. I want to start by saying I retired in 2002. It is true that we are primarily trained to do PA type work. The Navy equivilent training is a least as good as ours, but a doc's skills have more to do with brain power and experiance than service branch. I have met young Navy corpsmen who's skills were lacking. AF IDMTs typically first have at least 6yrs as a regular hospital medic. The old IDMTs were usually much better clinicians because they typically had extensive ER experiance before they were picked by the Senior Medic to attend IDMT school. The average washout rate for school was 10% to up to 50%. Army field medics typically get very little medical facility,clinical time. AF PJs also get very little clinical time and most of their trauma training is simulated. Idmts are used primarily to take care of small groups of military 30-150. When deployed, I did not work with doctors very often and very rarely with nurses. Navy corpsman are put in situations where they are completly on their own. I usually had a host nation doc fairly close if things got ugly. I am sure that AF IDMTS have the best funding for drugs, supplies and equipment of all the branches, based on my experiance. Better than the Brits, for sure. I constantly gave other branches (mostly army)drugs and other supplies. The Army Green Baret medics that I met had a decent mix of trauma and clinical skills.
  12. by   amazony71
    please do not label an AF medic as a corpsman...the reason Hospital Corpsman of the navy are called "corpsman" is because we are apart of the Marine....CORPS. AF medical enlisted are medics. Our name is sacred.
  13. by   amazony71
    Quote from jnette
    Do your research well. I am an ex AF medic (corpsman), and absolutely loved it. Training was superb, and continuous OJT as you serve your time.

    After active, I joined the AF Reserves as a Flight Medic doing Air Evac... fabulous again, no regrests. Often wish I was still doing that.


    But yes, Navy definately has excellent training as well, so check them all out.. spend some time with the recruiters and get the FULL story.

    Best of luck !
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    please do not label an AF medic as a corpsman...the reason Hospital Corpsman of the navy are called "corpsman" is because we are apart of the Marine....CORPS. AF medical enlisted are medics, they have nothing to do with the marine corps.

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