Mc Donalds pays more for CNA with 8 yrs exp - page 4

:rotfl: I have said it for years now it really happened. I live in WA close to the Seattle area. Moved here from the Midwest about 5 years ago and I even said it back then. You can flip... Read More

  1. by   germain
    Yes, in LTC CNA's are paid very poorly, but here in Seattle metro area, home health aides get 10-12$/hour with agencies, and I get 15.50 as a hospital aide , this is all with a minimum of 2 years experience ( I have 11). That still isn't much, but its more than burgers. Good aides leave LTC and go elsewhere, and you all know who is left.

    THink of what animal specialists at the zoo get paid to feed monkeys and tigers, its a LOT more. Its just SO SAD that long term care is so awful. I keep waiting for the public outrage at our McNursing home mentality.

    I am almost through with my nursing pre-reqs and started because I want so badly to make things better for aides. I wanted to study management. This is something I feel very strongly about. Now I don't know if that's possible, It seems like such an uphill battle.

    I am also involved with SEIU and I want to encourage all of you to try and UNIONIZE your aides. State paid homcare workers here in Washington are now unionized and they get paid near 9$/hr plus low cost health insurance. Thats still peanuts, but its better than 5 eyars ago when it was 6.15 w/o Benifits. Nursing homes are seeing similar gains. There is a new push to unionize these workers! Thats where the hope lies, if it lies anywhere.
  2. by   nursemike
    This is not an easy problem. Where I work, as an escort, support staff are union, but nurses aren't. I am so looking forward to getting out of my union! Wages/benefits are OK, not great, but after six years I make $10/hr (9something base) and have decent benies. Aides used to make 0.35 more, but got bumped up a pay grade in last contract, now about 72 cents more than me. $1400 a year is worth thinking about... and both jobs beat flipping burgers. I think entry for an aide is now just over $8/hr. It isn't enough, but I'm not sure how you pay for a lot more. Medical costs are through the roof, as it is.

    I think nurses' aide is good prep for nursing school, but any clinical job is some help. I also think anyone working full time in healthcare should be safely above the poverty level, at least for a single person at entry, and enough to raise a kid or two with experience (experience is very valuable--even in my lowly job, I know enough to make a big difference in a bad situation, even if it's just when to scream for a nurse!)

    On a related issue, patient loads for aides are typically too large. A really good aide can do good care on 8, occassionally, but 6 is more realistic, and no aide can be thorough with twelve.

    Of course, I fully intend to be the sort of nurse who doesn't kill the aide for my six patients. I plan to be a team player and get right in there with the blood and the poop and the body parts. I also expect that nearly every graduating nurse thinks the same thing. Guess I'll be finding out soon what happens. I do work with a number of nurses who live up to what I expect from myself, so it's going to be hard to just sit in the report room and give orders.

    uh, I didn't finish my thought on unions. They have their place, but all too often mine will fight tooth and nail to keep someone on so I can do their job, along with mine.
    Last edit by nursemike? on Feb 19, '05
  3. by   germain
    Yeah, I hear you that unions can sometimes seem to cause problems when they support workers who are lazy. IN theory those rules are meant to make it hard for staff to get fired without reason, but sometimes there IS reason, it jsut needs documentation.

    Certainly the benifits of fighting together to get better pay and staffing ratios is worth it. If we don't band together management will just squeeze us little people for everything we've got. THEY NEVER HAVE OUR BEST INTEREST IN MIND- ONLY $ AND PROFIT.

    Still, unions need to work on their image problem. Unions are the ONLY way workers have ever gotten benifits, but they too have interests, the workers are not always on the top of their list. I believe strongly that if more people got involved and demanded better leadership from our unions, we would get it.
  4. by   nursemike
    I have to admit, I've never been to one union meeting, so it's not exactly fair to complain that my voice isn't heard. On the other hand, for the first few years I worked there, a fair part of the union membership wanted badly to do away with my job classification, which doesn't exactly encourage loyalty.

    My personnal experience with management is that they want me to be happy and fulfilled in my work. We have 2000 employees, and the CEO calls me by my first name. Of course, we're also a not-for-profit corporation, which reduces a lot of the pressures. We were in the red my first two years, and in a business, that's pretty dire. Wasn't a picnic for us, either, but now that we're running in the black, we're not under intense pressure to increase profits. For us, the issue is more to do with reducing costs.

    It all ties together, though. Today, I had to throw away several opened packages of Dri-Flo chucks (we also do the terminal cleans in patient rooms). Had nurses and aides been more careful to open one pack at a time, we'd have saved a fair amount of money. That same pattern, unit-by-unit and day-by-day, amounts to enough to pay for real improvements--better equipment, more staff, bigger bonuses, whatever. But how to get people to see that? A lot figure it just goes to by the bosses a new Mercedes, so why bother?

    Eh, if I knew the answers, I could be one of the bosses.
  5. by   mercyteapot
    Yes, it does happen here, too. As far as I know, none of the fast food places give their line staff enough hours to qualify for health benefits, but there are places that pay a premium for the lunch rush. OTOH, my husband works for one of the major fast food chains, and the majority of his staff only earn slightly more than the $6.75 minimum wage in this state.
  6. by   bobnurse
    we had a CNA leave to be a waitress at a restraunt.....
    We had a CNA leave to be a secretary....
    We had a CNA leave to work at walmart.....
    and We had a LPN leave to become a manager for a 7-11

    The list goes on and on
  7. by   nursemike
    I worked with a nursing student in the same job as mine. She left to be a waitress. She made $168/night in tips. Cute girl. She's a nurse, now. Talk about dedication to the profession.
  8. by   oldcurlyrn49
    Hello,
    First allow me to introduce myself, I am new to the forum.
    I am an RN currently working on a 12 bed peds unit. We have a 16 year
    old high school student working on our unit as a CNA. Apparently there is some new program in place to recruit students interested in pursuing
    an RN degree. She makes $10.35/hour, does not know how to make a bed
    or how to screw a nipple on a baby bottle. To make matters worse she
    was told she would be assisting RNs during procedures IVs, caths etc...
    She does not feel it is her responsibilty to pass pt. trays or get them
    up to the bathroom, which is something we all do on the unit, no matter what your title. Oh, and she no longer wants to be a nurse, its too
    gross, and there is too much paper work.Her only motivation to work is
    to buy a $300.00 designer purse. I would think we could "find" a nursing
    student who genuinely wants to work peds, don't you?
  9. by   germain
    Quote from oldcurlyrn49
    Hello,
    First allow me to introduce myself, I am new to the forum.
    I am an RN currently working on a 12 bed peds unit. We have a 16 year
    old high school student working on our unit as a CNA. Apparently there is some new program in place to recruit students interested in pursuing
    an RN degree. She makes $10.35/hour, does not know how to make a bed
    or how to screw a nipple on a baby bottle. To make matters worse she
    was told she would be assisting RNs during procedures IVs, caths etc...
    She does not feel it is her responsibilty to pass pt. trays or get them
    up to the bathroom, which is something we all do on the unit, no matter what your title. Oh, and she no longer wants to be a nurse, its too
    gross, and there is too much paper work.Her only motivation to work is
    to buy a $300.00 designer purse. I would think we could "find" a nursing
    student who genuinely wants to work peds, don't you?
    Yes you could. A regular run of the mill CNA would do better. Let 16 year olds volunteer, not work, in nursing homes.
  10. by   ridesnow
    Quote from oldcurlyrn49
    Hello,
    First allow me to introduce myself, I am new to the forum.
    I am an RN currently working on a 12 bed peds unit. We have a 16 year
    old high school student working on our unit as a CNA. Apparently there is some new program in place to recruit students interested in pursuing
    an RN degree. She makes $10.35/hour, does not know how to make a bed
    or how to screw a nipple on a baby bottle. To make matters worse she
    was told she would be assisting RNs during procedures IVs, caths etc...
    She does not feel it is her responsibilty to pass pt. trays or get them
    up to the bathroom, which is something we all do on the unit, no matter what your title. Oh, and she no longer wants to be a nurse, its too
    gross, and there is too much paper work.Her only motivation to work is
    to buy a $300.00 designer purse. I would think we could "find" a nursing
    student who genuinely wants to work peds, don't you?
    The 16 year old will probably go through quit a few jobs before she finds out what she really wants. As for me, I've found this rather depressing ($) for someone like myself ,32 years old, who is doing a career change to nursing and will be starting out as a CNA and working my way up. I'm not able to go to school full-time with a family and a full-time job to support us. What I would like to know is --- is a RN who has worked her way up the ladder more respected than a BSN straight out of school. Curious!
  11. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from ridesnow
    The 16 year old will probably go through quit a few jobs before she finds out what she really wants. As for me, I've found this rather depressing ($) for someone like myself ,32 years old, who is doing a career change to nursing and will be starting out as a CNA and working my way up. I'm not able to go to school full-time with a family and a full-time job to support us. What I would like to know is --- is a RN who has worked her way up the ladder more respected than a BSN straight out of school. Curious!
    I don't understand your question. Respected professionally? I would say that experience and performance are what will earn professional respect. Respected personally? I also think personal respect is earned, not conferred on the basis of how one attains their current position. Certainly you can respect someone's practical skills without having personal respect for them, and having total personal respect for someone who is still honing their professional skills. I will say this, in some ways, the nurse who started as a CNA has a less radical learning curve when it comes to the actual practice of nursing, and dealing with the reality of the way things are for us in the workplace, but I'm not sure that translates to respect.
  12. by   DenaInWyo
    I just took a pay cut from $15 or more per hour as a waitress to take my first CNA job at a LTC. Yep, I'm nuts :chuckle I'm also REALLY sick of being a waitress.

    Mostly I really feel that the experience will benefit me during nursing school (I'm semester 2 of 4 in an ADN program). I feel like I'm really at a disadvantage right now compared to my CNA classmates.

    Where I'm at though, it isn't going to be TOO bad compared to what I've been reading on here. I start at 8.50/hr (.30-.80 shift differentials) until my liscense finally comes in from the BON, then go to 9.50/hr with .50-1.00 differentials. The differentials are great for me because I will be working nights and weekends. Saturday night, once I have my official liscense, I'll be looking at 11.00 an hour. Oh yeah, and there's that $500 sign on bonus, and a $30 bonus for coming in if you get called to pick up a shift.

    Personally, I don't know how the heck a person could get by on less, especially someplace like California where the cost of living is so much higher. 6 bucks an hour is like 4 an hour (maybe less!) here in Wyoming.
  13. by   ridesnow
    Quote from mercyteapot
    I don't understand your question. Respected professionally? I would say that experience and performance are what will earn professional respect. Respected personally? I also think personal respect is earned, not conferred on the basis of how one attains their current position. Certainly you can respect someone's practical skills without having personal respect for them, and having total personal respect for someone who is still honing their professional skills. I will say this, in some ways, the nurse who started as a CNA has a less radical learning curve when it comes to the actual practice of nursing, and dealing with the reality of the way things are for us in the workplace, but I'm not sure that translates to respect.
    Thanks!

close