Would the best goal be an RN? Advice please! Thanks :)

  1. Hi there,
    I've been swimming through information on the internet about this. With all the ads for online schools it is really hard to find good information. I would appreciate any advice, especially from those of you who have already completed your degrees/certifications.

    I have a bachelors degree in philosophy. I have completed some graduate school courses in child development and education science, and I would like to get a degree in nursing. I am applying to volunteer at a local children's hospital, and I will apply to a nursing program in the spring or fall, whichever I can get into. What is the best thing for me to do? I'm interested in pediatrics, but I understand a lot of that has to do with placement and not always necessarily the RN degree. What is the best advice to give someone like me who has not a lot of knowledge about the field degrees so far? I know my undergraduate is not in the same field, but I am ready to take any necessary prerequisites, if there are any prerequisites for an RN. Am I going about this the right way? I would really appreciate any advice anyone can give me... with all the advertising on the internet sometimes its hard to make heads or tails of the sites out there. (any unbiased information sites would also be much apprecated.) thanks again!

    Jamie
    •  
  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   2ner
    From what I understand about schools like Excelsior (a few ppl at my school are doing that), you have to have completed the first two semesters at a traditional school. I can't speak for everyone, but what I did, was enroll in one of the local community colleges in my area to the Associates Degree Program (and it's one of the hardest in the nation - YUK). After pre-reqs are out of the way (all sciences here had to be w/in 5 years - and we had to take the NET test), it's four semesters of Nursing Classess (first semester is fundamentals, second at mine is OB and Med-surg, third gets more into patho mainly cardiac with alot more pharmacology than we had in second, and fourth is psych). While your in the ADN program you can also take pre-reqs to bridge from RN to BSN or RN to MSN in my area.

    The best thing to do is research the schools you want to go to, start getting whatever pre-reqs they require, meet with a counselor and start whatever steps necessary to get on the waiting list.

    Good luck!

    Oh yeah, when I first started I was gung-ho on entering psych as soon as I graduated, then flipped to NICU, but am back to psych, so you can change your mind once you get in and figure out what you enjoy the most.
  4. by   Rhoresmith
    Every school has different requirements contact the schools in your area and have them send you what they require for a nursing degree and how long ago they will accept the class (my school is 10 yrs) and then if you want to attend the online have them send you their requirements. That would be the only way to know for sure we can all tell you our schools information but that might not apply to the school you wish to attend. If you want make an appointment with a couselor at the school and they can go over options with you
    Good luck
  5. by   Altra
    Quote from PureNoumena
    Hi there,
    I've been swimming through information on the internet about this. With all the ads for online schools it is really hard to find good information. I would appreciate any advice, especially from those of you who have already completed your degrees/certifications.

    I have a bachelors degree in philosophy. I have completed some graduate school courses in child development and education science, and I would like to get a degree in nursing. I am applying to volunteer at a local children's hospital, and I will apply to a nursing program in the spring or fall, whichever I can get into. What is the best thing for me to do? I'm interested in pediatrics, but I understand a lot of that has to do with placement and not always necessarily the RN degree. What is the best advice to give someone like me who has not a lot of knowledge about the field degrees so far? I know my undergraduate is not in the same field, but I am ready to take any necessary prerequisites, if there are any prerequisites for an RN. Am I going about this the right way? I would really appreciate any advice anyone can give me... with all the advertising on the internet sometimes its hard to make heads or tails of the sites out there. (any unbiased information sites would also be much apprecated.) thanks again!

    Jamie
    Hi Jamie,

    I'm not sure what you mean by pediatrics re: "placement and not always necessarily the RN degree." What specifically would you like to do in pediatrics?

    Prerequisites for ADN programs typically include A&P (2 semesters), microbiology, nutrition, psych, sociology, and some type of English comp. Additionally, the A&P and micro classes often have bio and/or chem as prerequisites.

    Check out local colleges and universities in your area. Some may offer an accelerated BSN program for those who already have undergrad degrees. Diploma programs (if there are any in your area) can also be quicker than some ADN programs, because the "pre-req" courses are often included. About 1/3 of my class in a hospital-based diploma program already has a degree in some other field.

    Hope this helps!
  6. by   PureNoumena
    Quote from MLOS
    Hi Jamie,

    I'm not sure what you mean by pediatrics re: "placement and not always necessarily the RN degree." What specifically would you like to do in pediatrics?

    Prerequisites for ADN programs typically include A&P (2 semesters), microbiology, nutrition, psych, sociology, and some type of English comp. Additionally, the A&P and micro classes often have bio and/or chem as prerequisites.

    Check out local colleges and universities in your area. Some may offer an accelerated BSN program for those who already have undergrad degrees. Diploma programs (if there are any in your area) can also be quicker than some ADN programs, because the "pre-req" courses are often included. About 1/3 of my class in a hospital-based diploma program already has a degree in some other field.

    Hope this helps!
    It does help, thanks What I meant was... i would like to be involved with childrens care. It doesnt seem as though the RN degree/certificate is specific to age, however. (Or at least, the information I have been finding on the internet doesn't say anything about that.) I was wondering if there is anything I have to do, specifically, to qualify or specialize in a pediatrics for nursing. Do you know any good websites that outline the basic timelines/requirements/differences between diploma, RN, LPN AND CNA? Thanks for your help!
    jamie
  7. by   PureNoumena
    Quote from Rhoresmith
    Every school has different requirements contact the schools in your area and have them send you what they require for a nursing degree and how long ago they will accept the class (my school is 10 yrs) and then if you want to attend the online have them send you their requirements. That would be the only way to know for sure we can all tell you our schools information but that might not apply to the school you wish to attend. If you want make an appointment with a couselor at the school and they can go over options with you
    Good luck
    thanks, thats a great idea. I have been discussing things with some friends I have that are nurses, but I think talking to a school counselor person-to-person instead of this online information would be a great way to find out what I need to do, specifically, for any needed degree. Thanks
    Jamie
  8. by   PureNoumena
    What degree/certificate are you going for? Do I need to do all that again (science, etc) to get my RN if I already have my bachelors degree? I will definately talk to a school counselor to find out what my options are, exactly... and also to find out exactly what I need to do. There are a lot of schools in my area. There are so many options, and the requirements vary from school to school, so it gets pretty confusing! I already have my bachelors in philosophy... but I also have some science and child development classes under my belt, so I'm not sure what I will have to deal with pre-requisite-wise. thanks again for the help


    Quote from 2ner
    From what I understand about schools like Excelsior (a few ppl at my school are doing that), you have to have completed the first two semesters at a traditional school. I can't speak for everyone, but what I did, was enroll in one of the local community colleges in my area to the Associates Degree Program (and it's one of the hardest in the nation - YUK). After pre-reqs are out of the way (all sciences here had to be w/in 5 years - and we had to take the NET test), it's four semesters of Nursing Classess (first semester is fundamentals, second at mine is OB and Med-surg, third gets more into patho mainly cardiac with alot more pharmacology than we had in second, and fourth is psych). While your in the ADN program you can also take pre-reqs to bridge from RN to BSN or RN to MSN in my area.

    The best thing to do is research the schools you want to go to, start getting whatever pre-reqs they require, meet with a counselor and start whatever steps necessary to get on the waiting list.

    Good luck!

    Oh yeah, when I first started I was gung-ho on entering psych as soon as I graduated, then flipped to NICU, but am back to psych, so you can change your mind once you get in and figure out what you enjoy the most.
  9. by   JudithL_in_NH
    You probably should speak with a counselor at a school you're interested in, with your undergrad transcript in hand, to see what they will accept in transfer. Most schools will give you a idea of what they will accept in transfer at a preliminary admissions interview. Every school can provide you with a listing of exactly what courses comprise its nursing program.

    My experience: I have a BA in French/Linguistics; every pre-req transferred except for A&P I and II and Microbiology, so I took those by going part time the two semesters before I began my program at a CC. I had never had those sciences at a college level--only college Physics and Biology. A&P I&II and Micro are pretty standard pre-reqs for most nursing programs--so if you haven't taken them already you will need to.

    I now take a 9 credit nursing course (feels like 15 credits, easy!) every semester; after four semesters, I'll hopefully pass the NCLEX licensing exam and become an ADN-RN. I live in the boonies so I had no accelerated program options.

    RE: pediatrics. To my knowledge, the average new-hire floor nurse there is an RN without specialized training. You will do at least one pediatrics rotation as part of your RN training, possibly a second if your program offers a preceptorship where you get to pick the specialty.

    Best of luck!
  10. by   PureNoumena
    Quote from JudithL_in_NH
    You probably should speak with a counselor at a school you're interested in, with your undergrad transcript in hand, to see what they will accept in transfer. Most schools will give you a idea of what they will accept in transfer at a preliminary admissions interview. Every school can provide you with a listing of exactly what courses comprise its nursing program.

    My experience: I have a BA in French/Linguistics; every pre-req transferred except for A&P I and II and Microbiology, so I took those by going part time the two semesters before I began my program at a CC. I had never had those sciences at a college level--only college Physics and Biology. A&P I&II and Micro are pretty standard pre-reqs for most nursing programs--so if you haven't taken them already you will need to.

    I now take a 9 credit nursing course (feels like 15 credits, easy!) every semester; after four semesters, I'll hopefully pass the NCLEX licensing exam and become an ADN-RN. I live in the boonies so I had no accelerated program options.

    RE: pediatrics. To my knowledge, the average new-hire floor nurse there is an RN without specialized training. You will do at least one pediatrics rotation as part of your RN training, possibly a second if your program offers a preceptorship where you get to pick the specialty.

    Best of luck!
    thank you so much! I'm going to see if I can get a copy of my transcripts so I can have that in hand when I go in to see a counselor. I only recently decided I wanted to go back to school, so I don't know that I have that handy anymore. I'm not sure if I have as much available to transfer as you might have... I don't have a lot of science under my belt, and I will definately have to take anatomy... (which I wanted to anyway, so I'm very excited). This is all great though, I'm getting a decent estimate of how long it might take me to complete an RN. I will definately try to do summer school as well, if that option is available. Do you know what the average GPA is coming in and going out of your school? I graduated from college with I think a 3.44, but everyone is saying that nursing schools are pretty competitive. I hope I can get in.
  11. by   cherokeesummer
    My degree is in Psych and I too have taken graduate courses as well. Then I decided to go into nursing. I will still finish my MS because I am almost done.

    But in the meantime, I am goin through a diploma program because its faster. Once I'm done and actually working as a nurse, I will try to do some crossover programs to get a BSN or MSN.

    Call around and see what the area colleges offer. You would be suprised how frequent this situation is.
  12. by   JudithL_in_NH
    Quote from PureNoumena
    Do you know what the average GPA is coming in and going out of your school? I graduated from college with I think a 3.44, but everyone is saying that nursing schools are pretty competitive. I hope I can get in.
    Every school is different--one school (a BSN program) accepted me without even seeing my transcripts (so no consideration of grades), so be sure to apply to all the schools available in your area as their expectations may vary quite a bit.

    The program I am in is very competitive (strong program + high NCLEX pass rate + low tuition = competitive!). I haven't come across anyone who got in with less than a 3.8 (that's what I had). I am now struggling to maintain a 3.6 after two semesters--the program is hard! There is no one in our program with a 4.0 and the majority of the class is in the 2.6-3.0 range.

    In our program, one can pass and stay in the program with a 2.0 average in the nursing classes. Many programs consider 2.0 failing, and one must maintain a 2.5-3.0 average to stay in the program (passing average varies from institution to institution). Of our last year's senior class, 46 entered and 22 graduated (most failed the third semester). Most of those who failed third semester have been readmitted to retake third semester with my class.

    It is hard, but you can do it!

close