Student Teaching Presentation - page 2

i did my presentation today. i spoke to a mixed group of teen students about contraceptives. i enjoyed the experience and the answers to my posttest questions signified the students listen. ... Read More

  1. by   Sarah, RNBScN
    A couple of years ago, I did a project on Prostate Cancer for a group of employee's in an underground mining setting. It was awesome...lots of questions...great response...I thoroughly enjoyed it.
  2. by   NICU_Nurse
    We had to do individual group presentations during Psych- I did anger management and it went amazingly well. I stopped off at the drugstore and bought 20 of those 2/1.00 wireless notebooks and a bunch of markers (no pens or pencils allowed on the unit). I handed them out and urged the patients to vent their frustrations on paper- whether they wrote a journal, poetry, drew pictures, wrote the same word again and again, or just furiously scribbled on the pages to get the aggression out of their bodies. Went GREAT- have never seen that many people participating in my life (who can't relate to anger management?) and they all loved the 'gifts'. Made them feel like someone really cared, and it made me feel very good as well. Thank god no one broke out into a fight during my group, but I did have one issue: Towards the end, I asked for contributions from people who hadn't participated. One schizophrenic, socially inappropriate man raised his hand, much to my surprise, and said he had a contribution to make. I said, Oh, please share with us! And he said:

    You're kind of fat and your ***s are humongous.

    ROFL! Anyway. Umm, thanks for pointing that out.



    We also had to do a public presentation in the ER clinic waiting room at a very large, very urban public hospital. We each had different topics to do, which made it interesting. I did STD prevention, complete with how to put on a condom properly (I used a banana), grody pictures of STD's, and lots of free stuff I had gotten from Planned Parenthood, the AIDS task force, etc. Someone else did testicular cancer and made a little sac with a seed in it to symbolize a cancerous nodule. I think he used silicone hair gel inside- it was the neatest little thing. He passed it around and let people try to feel for it. The ones who participated got a free gift from him (can't remember what- we had so much stuff we'd bought/gathered). He also passed out walnuts with little ribbons glued to the bottom that said "Don't forget to check your nuts!" and that got a laugh out of them. Someone did diabetic foot care, which was highly appropriate. She asked how many people either had or knew someone who had diabetes in the room, and about 9/10 of the room raised their hands. She had a question-answer session and gave out little bottles of lotion and hand mirrors (to check the bottoms of their feet) as prizes. Someone else did breast cancer detection, and handed out pink balloons to demonstrate how to massage the breast when looking for nodules. We brought a glucometer and tested blood sugars for those who hadn't been diagnosed as diabetic, did blood pressure screenings for those who wanted them, and because it was near Thanksgiving, we had put together a gift basket with a $50 gift certificate to the grocery store (we all chipped in- there were like, 10 of us) so they could get a turkey for the holidays. We also brought stickers, coloring sheets, and sugar-free suckers for the kids who happened to be there with their parents. It was so much fun! I loved it, we all had a great time, and I'd do it again in a heartbeat. I wish I could do that all day long. I'd leave bedside nursing in a heartbeat!
  3. by   nrsesand
    Any ideas on a topic?
    How can I make it fun?
    Thanks!
    Sandie
  4. by   tambareyne1
    Hi Love A Nurse, I see this is an old thread but I am doing my teaching presentation on contraception and I was wondering if you had any good, creative ideas, teaching tools you used that you may be able to share with me?? I guess because it is such a broad topic, I am finding myself overwhelmed. Thanking you in advance,

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