My advice to ALL nursing students! - page 2

Hello! I am a 3rd year nursing student (3 of 5 semesters) and I come from a corporate background. I have no previous nursing experience except of what I've learned in clinicals until NOW. I... Read More

  1. by   flightnurse2b
    just be careful, some of the short cuts you will pick up from being a tech can get you in trouble in nursing school. i find myself sometimes having to take a step back when getting a competency check off in at clinical, because i have to think ok.. this is how i usually do this.. but what does the book say??

    anyway, i do agree with you that being a CNA/PCT/NT/EMT is invaluable experience. it definately gives you confidence in an otherwise scary and unfamiliar environment.

    good luck in your schooling!
  2. by   CRNA2BKY
    I (along with 4 other classmates) had the exact OPPOSITE experience. We are in an accelerated BSN program, so it's VERY fast and furious. The 5 of us chose to try doing a bit of CNA work on the side, just for the expereince. Well, I can tell you that was absolutely, without a shadow of a doubt, the worst experience of my entire life. Out of the 5 of us, all of us quit our job within 8 weeks. It was sooooooo miserable.

    We all had come from different careers, and were well respected in our fields. Then we come and do CNA work, and were treated like crap. The nurses would just sit on their butts talking about everything, and let the phones ring off the hook until a CNA answered the phones. Then, they would do things like ask us to "bring a blanket to room xxx" or "take xyz to the bathroom", and then they would just sit on their butts and do nothing. As the CNA, I would have 24 patients to myself, usually 3 or 4 of them with c-diff., and none of the nurses would ever help out. So, as you can imagine, here I was, trying to clean the 4 patients with c-diff about 10 times each per shift, plus cleaning their bed sheets, plus doing ALL the blood sugars, plus taking everyone else to the bathroom and cleaning them up, plus walking patients, plus...plus...plus!!!! You get the picture. It was a royal pain in the tush. And no help from the nurses. And then, they had the nerve to refuse to answer any patient call lights. Why? Because according to them, that was the CNA's job to answer the phones. My goodness....it all became too much. Not only did I quit, but everyone else in my class who also held CNA jobs (at various hospitals, I might add) quit their jobs too. It was just too much work with too much BS to put up with. Our school work was much more important to us, and we valued not getting thrown out of the ABSN program. It was too much to do both.
    So, if you are in an ABSN program, I would highly recommend you don't work as a CNA...too much stress, too little money, too much time taken away from schoolwork, and the thought of seeing how lazy nurses can be just turns my stomach. It was a HORRIBLE experience that I wouldn't wish on anyone.
    Last edit by CRNA2BKY on Dec 22, '07
  3. by   flightnurse2b
    Quote from nurse2bKY
    We all had come from different careers, and were well respected in our fields. Then we come and do CNA work, and were treated like crap. The nurses would just sit on their butts talking about everything, and let the phones ring off the hook until a CNA answered the phones. Then, they would do things like ask us to "bring a blanket to room xxx" or "take xyz to the bathroom", and then they would just sit on their butts and do nothing. As the CNA, I would have 24 patients to myself, usually 3 or 4 of them with c-diff., and none of the nurses would ever help out. So, as you can imagine, here I was, trying to clean the 4 patients with c-diff about 10 times each per shift, plus cleaning their bed sheets, plus doing ALL the blood sugars, plus taking everyone else to the bathroom and cleaning them up, plus walking patients, plus...plus...plus!!!! You get the picture. It was a royal pain in the tush. And no help from the nurses. And then, they had the nerve to refuse to answer any patient call lights. Why? Because according to them, that was the CNA's job to answer the phones. My goodness....it all became too much. Not only did I quit, but everyone else in my class who also held CNA jobs (at various hospitals, I might add) quit their jobs too. It was just too much work with too much BS to put up with. Our school work was much more important to us, and we valued not getting thrown out of the ABSN program. It was too much to do both.
    So, if you are in an ABSN program, I would highly recommend you don't work as a CNA...too much stress, too little money, too much time taken away from schoolwork, and the thought of seeing how lazy nurses can be just turns my stomach. It was a HORRIBLE experience that I wouldn't wish on anyone.
    hate to say it, nursing is stressful. the pay isnt spectacular. and even though you are a nurse, you may still be treated like crap.

    being a CNA is alot of physical and mental stress, and being a nurse is also alot of physical and mental stress, but responsibility for the CNA as well. just because you are a nurse, doesnt mean you are exempt from walking patients, changing diapers and taking blood sugars. you are ultimately responsible for caring for your patient... the CNA is under your license.

    anyways, don't think of it as a negative experience. use it as something positive. it will make you a better nurse. because now you know how badly it feels to be the CNA getting dumped on, you will be more helpful when you are the nurse and your CNA asks for help to change a poopy diaper.
    Last edit by flightnurse2b on Dec 22, '07
  4. by   shoegalRN
    Quote from nurse2bKY
    I (along with 4 other classmates) had the exact OPPOSITE experience. We are in an accelerated BSN program, so it's VERY fast and furious. The 5 of us chose to try doing a bit of CNA work on the side, just for the expereince. Well, I can tell you that was absolutely, without a shadow of a doubt, the worst experience of my entire life. Out of the 5 of us, all of us quit our job within 8 weeks. It was sooooooo miserable.

    We all had come from different careers, and were well respected in our fields. Then we come and do CNA work, and were treated like crap. The nurses would just sit on their butts talking about everything, and let the phones ring off the hook until a CNA answered the phones. Then, they would do things like ask us to "bring a blanket to room xxx" or "take xyz to the bathroom", and then they would just sit on their butts and do nothing. As the CNA, I would have 24 patients to myself, usually 3 or 4 of them with c-diff., and none of the nurses would ever help out. So, as you can imagine, here I was, trying to clean the 4 patients with c-diff about 10 times each per shift, plus cleaning their bed sheets, plus doing ALL the blood sugars, plus taking everyone else to the bathroom and cleaning them up, plus walking patients, plus...plus...plus!!!! You get the picture. It was a royal pain in the tush. And no help from the nurses. And then, they had the nerve to refuse to answer any patient call lights. Why? Because according to them, that was the CNA's job to answer the phones. My goodness....it all became too much. Not only did I quit, but everyone else in my class who also held CNA jobs (at various hospitals, I might add) quit their jobs too. It was just too much work with too much BS to put up with. Our school work was much more important to us, and we valued not getting thrown out of the ABSN program. It was too much to do both.
    So, if you are in an ABSN program, I would highly recommend you don't work as a CNA...too much stress, too little money, too much time taken away from schoolwork, and the thought of seeing how lazy nurses can be just turns my stomach. It was a HORRIBLE experience that I wouldn't wish on anyone.
    I'm sorry you had such a bad experience.

    I'm not in an accerlerated BSN program, but I am in a traditional BSN program. I have a 7 week break and decided to be proactive with my time off and start working.

    The nurses so far have been great. When I couldnt get a BS on a pt, one nurse did it herself. Some of the nurses helped with bed changes, baths, and cleaning poppy patients. When we were busy, the nurses did answer call lights and did whatever it was the patient needed since we were taking care of another patient. Even the Unit Secretary helped out from time to time.

    When school starts back, I will only be working 1 day a week and that's going to be on Saturdays. My schedule allows me 2 days off during the week and I will be using those days to study.
  5. by   CRNA2BKY
    Quote from allison2008
    hate to say it, nursing is stressful. the pay isnt spectacular. and even though you are a nurse, you may still be treated like crap.

    being a CNA is alot of physical and mental stress, and being a nurse is also alot of physical and mental stress, but responsibility for the CNA as well. just because you are a nurse, doesnt mean you are exempt from walking patients, changing diapers and taking blood sugars. you are ultimately responsible for caring for your patient... the CNA is under your license.

    anyways, don't think of it as a negative experience. use it as something positive. it will make you a better nurse. because now you know how badly it feels to be the CNA getting dumped on, you will be more helpful when you are the nurse and your CNA asks for help to change a poopy diaper.
    Actually, I won't be treated like crap. I refuse to be treated poorly, and any nurse who thinks they can get away with treating ANYONE around me like crap has got a world of hurting coming their way. I will not stand for it, and neither should anyone else. I know of no other industry that has so many managers that think they can treat their people poorly, but this HUGE problem has to stop. And, I, for one, have always been willing to throw my muscles around if I see someone being treated poorly. I will stand up for myself, and anyone else. And if I can't change the system, then I will let management know why they are losing good employees, as I turn my resignation in.
  6. by   baby1234
    Hello everyone, I am a new nursing student and I start classes 1-7-08. I am very nervous and can't sleep. I hope to talk to some of you when I need help. I wish all of you a very nice week.
  7. by   studently42
    Thanks for starting this thread nurse2be09. I was just browsing to see if this topic had been touched upon. I have an interview at a hospital in a few hours for a nurse tech position.They stated that one of the job requirements was that you had to be in an RN program. I'm assuming that this means that they will very open to scheduling around my nursing classes. The pay is low, but the benifits are really good compared to what I'm used to. I really enjoyed my first semester of clinicals and there was an LPN in my class that helped me tremendously as I have never worked in healthcare. Working as a tech, using some of the skills I've already learned just seems like it would be a huge advantage in future clinicals. The hospital is in the same system as the one where I did clinicals and uses the same charting system, which should help. Well, I haven't been on a job interview in 24 years and I'd better go get ready. My wife asked me if I was nervous. I said, "No, am I supposed to be?".
    Thanks Again, Wish Me Luck
  8. by   harrella
    I agree with a lot of the previous messages. Working as a tech can be very helpful, in the sense that you get a feel for the workings of a hospital. I have been a tech for a year at a large hospital here in St. Louis. My personal experience has been great. I ask the nurses for help when I need them, and they are willing. I love asking them questions about so many different things. They are sooo willing to show and teach. For example, if a nurse is starting an IV they will grab me and ask if I want to watch or it could be inserting a foley. It has been a wonderful learning experience!
    Like with anything there are the ups and downs. I have had horrible days when I was overloaded with patients and felt like there was no help in site. But I agree with an earlier poster, nursing is not easy, and can be very stressful. If you can get yourself through the tough days (which there will be many) you do anything.

    Thanks!

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