Gn skills level equivalent only to NA level 2?

  1. Im finishing as an ADN and came across this skills checklist in many nursing positions. Quite surprised to find out my skills only measured up to a nursing assistant level 2. Its depressing to know that. I dont even know how to interpret a 10 lead data. Shoot, I was happy I knew how to apply the leads! (only to find out its a nursing assistant skill :stone *gasp*) The only difference that I see from a NA and myself are my basic wound care skills and my lousy assessment skills (need to practice here so bad) My skills are no where near what a med-surg nurse is expected to do. Never was taught/ trained to do any procedure or handle any equipment in school or in the clinical. This is causing me quite a panic attack.

    Is it normal to have skills in this level only? or is it I just got some really really bad education. Two years in school is quite a long time to learn nursing assistant skills. Oh this really sucks!.

    With that said, how is a new graduate nurse is able to work in ICU with only 8wk orientation? I dont get it.
    Last edit by aruray on Dec 17, '04
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    I bet if you think about it, you will (or do) have skills as a GN (unlicensed graduate--once you are licensed you are an RN, thank you)....

    How about starting and stopping IV's?

    PRN meds? (I'd say, any meds, but I learned that some aides give meds....)

    IM's and SQ's.

    Giving nasal O2 without an order.

    Tube feedings.

    Placement of NG tubes.

    Assessment of prior placement of said NG tubes.

    Calling the physician for clarification of orders or to suggest some.

    Delegating.

    Assessment, nursing diagnosis, care planning, charting.

    Don't worry, you've got skills!
  4. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    Quote from aruray
    With that said, how is a new graduate nurse is able to work in ICU with only 8wk orientation? I dont get it.
    One word:

    Preceptor.
  5. by   aruray
    Quote from chris_at_lucas_RN
    One word:

    Preceptor.
    Ah yes I do have some skills, but still not enough required to take on a huge responsibility of having to take care of a patient. I felt really confident and competent to finally go out there and work as a nurse, until I saw the skills checklist. I feel so stupid and ignorant of even thinking I was ready to be an actual nurse. Theres no way I can effectively perform my duties with the skills that I have!

    After the perceptor is gone, then what?

    So it takes 8 wks to learn all these complicated procedures and treatments and two years in nursing school to qualify as a nurse's aide. The thought is making me crazy.
    Last edit by aruray on Dec 17, '04
  6. by   ZootRN
    Are you serious? Our textbook and clinical instructor said O2 is a drug and cannot be given without an order.

    Giving nasal O2 without an order.
  7. by   wonderbee
    Quote from mystic_fish0526
    Are you serious? Our textbook and clinical instructor said O2 is a drug and cannot be given without an order.

    Giving nasal O2 without an order.
    Or per hospital protocol, which is in effect, a standing order. Under most conditions, hospital protocol gives nurses authority to use O2 therapy on a PRN basis. When your patient is crashing, or is in acute distress, we have to be able to act quickly. Hospital protocol is a beautiful thing.
  8. by   CHATSDALE
    you know more than you think...and you are just on the first step of your journey...if the aid doesn't advance they will be at that level for the rest of their careers...you are standing on your foundation...make sure that you learn something everyday...remember everybody above you had to start out at the same level....GOOD LUCK
  9. by   rpbear
    With that said, how is a new graduate nurse is able to work in ICU with only 8wk orientation? I dont get it.
    8wk orientation to ICU is not long enough. I would push for 12 wks or longer if needed. I got 12 weeks orientation to L&D as a GN and one year later I still don't feel confident, i feel comfortable but not confident. You will learn a ton of skills in the first few weeks and you will become proficient in your skills you already know. You won't have your instructor breathing down your neck, and you won't have the fear of making the tiniest mistake and failing. Be a sponge and soak up everything form everybody!

    Good Luck!
  10. by   Tweety
    Quote from mystic_fish0526
    Are you serious? Our textbook and clinical instructor said O2 is a drug and cannot be given without an order.

    Giving nasal O2 without an order.
    We have a standing protocol algorithm that we are allowed to use. It was approved by the MDs teams but an RN can apply up to 2L NC without an MD order and is covered by this protocol. But only up to 2L, Plus, we can wean them off without an MD order, depending on the O2 sats.
  11. by   Tweety
    Quote from aruray
    Im finishing as an ADN and came across this skills checklist in many nursing positions. Quite surprised to find out my skills only measured up to a nursing assistant level 2. Its depressing to know that. I dont even know how to interpret a 10 lead data. Shoot, I was happy I knew how to apply the leads! (only to find out its a nursing assistant skill :stone *gasp*) The only difference that I see from a NA and myself are my basic wound care skills and my lousy assessment skills (need to practice here so bad) My skills are no where near what a med-surg nurse is expected to do. Never was taught/ trained to do any procedure or handle any equipment in school or in the clinical. This is causing me quite a panic attack.

    Is it normal to have skills in this level only? or is it I just got some really really bad education. Two years in school is quite a long time to learn nursing assistant skills. Oh this really sucks!.

    With that said, how is a new graduate nurse is able to work in ICU with only 8wk orientation? I dont get it.

    It's quite normal to feel overwhelmed and underqualified when one comes out of nursing school

    You are talking basic skills here, that we all have to develop. In RN school the first thing we learned was how to be a CNA, bed baths, linen changes etc.

    There are plenty of skills and tasks you can master on the job as they come up. Never be afraid to ask for help the first time you put in an NG, or discontinue a drain or other skills.

    However, what you have are assessment skills that you are going to fine tune, critical thinking you're going to learn, managing the care and needs of a group of patients and their families including pyscho social needs. These are the things that distinguish you as a profressional nurse. You are a profressional nurse, not a nurses aide. It takes a while to get comfortable in that role, so relax. No it isn't going to happen in 8 weeks, it might take up to a year.
    Last edit by Tweety on Dec 18, '04
  12. by   dosamigos76
    Congratulations on completing your program first of all. I am in an ADN program and took a semester off to work after completing my LPN portion. I work on a surgical floor. I don't know of ONE fellow student that has not felt exactly the same way! It will come and you will ask lots of questions. Take a deep breath and know that you've had a good education and have the brains to do this. The experience will come, one day at a time.
    Best of luck to you.

    Cheryl
  13. by   aruray
    thank you for your kind responses:Ball: it definitely helped me clam down a little. ill try to be positive and look forward to many many more opportunities of learning. yes you are right! a NA will have limited skills while I, will learn something new everyday. merry xmas everyone!
    Last edit by aruray on Dec 19, '04
  14. by   actioncat
    Two thoughts:
    1)Congratulations. You will now have some real opportunities to practice and learn clinical skills.
    2)Eight weeks is not nearly long enough for ICU orientation. I work med surg and had 12 weeks.

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