Failing 4th semester....feeling like a failure - page 3

by Leesha

5,577 Unique Views | 29 Comments

so i have been going to school for the last 6 years working towards my rn. yesterday i failed 4th semester by 3 questions which is 6 points. i did step out and got my lpn in march of this year but that was not my goal. i feel... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from herasheis
    I agree with Nurselovejoy88. Would you be able to return to your school to pick up where you left off--after a breather? I think many schools allow a second chance.
    I'm not sure what the policy is yet for re-entry. I have heard some people say that I would just have to retake the class that I failed while others have said that the entire semester has to be repeated. I can't see repeating the semester since I was successful in the other classes. I am waiting to hear from the school and I will make my decision then. Hopefully it will work out in my favor.

    Leesha
  2. 3
    "failing out of nursing school is not a rare thing, anymore. i predict that it's actually going to become a more frequent occurrence, because the schools stubbornly refuse to accept that the curriculum must change to fit the changing demographic of the current and future pool of students."

    i spend a good deal of time trying my best to help nursing students understand things they'll need as nurses because they're not getting it from their faculty somehow. however, i would not accept the premise that the curriculum must change to fit the changing demographic of the current and future pool of students if, as i see so often here and, as my friends in college education constantly bemoan, that demographic is increasingly characterized by illiteracy, innumeracy, and an overblown sense of entitlement. maybe it's a consequence of everyone in the junior soccer league getting the huge trophy for just showing up, even if the team never won a game; maybe it's decades of too much self-esteem workshops for parents. but dumbing-down nursing school because it's too hard for some people is a bad idea on so many levels it's hard to know where to start.

    the fact is that nursing is much more academically challenging now than it was a generation (or even half a generation) ago. patients are sicker, too. no longer will there be only one or two ivs on a med-surg floor, or someone who needs vs more often than twice a shift go to the icu. nurses need stronger critical thinking skills and organizational skills. they need better math skills, better assessment skills, and a better science education. that takes harder work than some students are prepared for or, in some cases, willing to do.

    students have to learn science, technology and pharmacology, of course, but even more, they need to truly understand the science, pharmacology or technology, the rationales for its use, and its limitations. else we will continue to be treated to sights i see almost every time i set foot in a hospital or review a record for a legal case: nurses relying on dynamaps without understanding why their wrong placement of the cuffs makes their readings worthless; a patient continuing to get heparin and enoxaparin for days ("what's the big deal? we give heparin and coumadin at the same time all the time!"); a cardiac patient with angina and a hgb of 6 is just fine "because his spo2 is 90, and that's good, right?" to mention a few. (if any of these make you wonder what my problem with them is, please let me explain...)

    i am truly sorry that someone who puts three semesters into nursing school finds that s/he is failing at the end of his/her fourth semester; it's hard to want something so bad and not be able to achieve it. i also hear the snarky behind "oh, it's that classic instructor-speak-- if the student is failing, it's not our fault." fact is, though, most of the class is not failing. sometimes you meet your limits, and it sounds as if this student, regretfully, has met them. there's a reason nursing school is hard. "if caring were enough, anyone could be a nurse" isn't just a slogan.
    EveRose, ProfRN4, and NCRNMDM like this.
  3. 0
    Quote from grntea
    "failing out of nursing school is not a rare thing, anymore. i predict that it's actually going to become a more frequent occurrence, because the schools stubbornly refuse to accept that the curriculum must change to fit the changing demographic of the current and future pool of students."

    i spend a good deal of time trying my best to help nursing students understand things they'll need as nurses because they're not getting it from their faculty somehow. however, i would not accept the premise that the curriculum must change to fit the changing demographic of the current and future pool of students if, as i see so often here and, as my friends in college education constantly bemoan, that demographic is increasingly characterized by illiteracy, innumeracy, and an overblown sense of entitlement. maybe it's a consequence of everyone in the junior soccer league getting the huge trophy for just showing up, even if the team never won a game; maybe it's decades of too much self-esteem workshops for parents. but dumbing-down nursing school because it's too hard for some people is a bad idea on so many levels it's hard to know where to start.

    the fact is that nursing is much more academically challenging now than it was a generation (or even half a generation) ago. patients are sicker, too. no longer will there be only one or two ivs on a med-surg floor, or someone who needs vs more often than twice a shift go to the icu. nurses need stronger critical thinking skills and organizational skills. they need better math skills, better assessment skills, and a better science education. that takes harder work than some students are prepared for or, in some cases, willing to do.

    students have to learn science, technology and pharmacology, of course, but even more, they need to truly understand the science, pharmacology or technology, the rationales for its use, and its limitations. else we will continue to be treated to sights i see almost every time i set foot in a hospital or review a record for a legal case: nurses relying on dynamaps without understanding why their wrong placement of the cuffs makes their readings worthless; a patient continuing to get heparin and enoxaparin for days ("what's the big deal? we give heparin and coumadin at the same time all the time!"); a cardiac patient with angina and a hgb of 6 is just fine "because his spo2 is 90, and that's good, right?" to mention a few. (if any of these make you wonder what my problem with them is, please let me explain...)

    i am truly sorry that someone who puts three semesters into nursing school finds that s/he is failing at the end of his/her fourth semester; it's hard to want something so bad and not be able to achieve it. i also hear the snarky behind "oh, it's that classic instructor-speak-- if the student is failing, it's not our fault." fact is, though, most of the class is not failing. sometimes you meet your limits, and it sounds as if this student, regretfully, has met them. there's a reason nursing school is hard. "if caring were enough, anyone could be a nurse" isn't just a slogan.
    thank you so much for this! you hit the nail right on the head in every aspect that you covered. i am only 19, but i feel blessed to have gotten into a nursing progarm. my program was incredibly competitive, and many people did not get acceptance letters. my first semester is about to come to a close, and i am anxiously awaiting second semester. i have heard that second semester and beyond is much more in depth as far as pathophysiology, pharmacology, and science goes, and i can't wait for that. i want to be a surgical icu nurse after i graduate, and i hope to work in an icu as a new grad. because of this, i am fascinated by the complex aspects of the human body, and i can't wait to begin learning. i know some things, but there is so much that i don't know. i want to be as prepared as possible when i do graduate because i want a job in icu so badly. i agree with you that many students feel entitled, and many feel that nursing should be made easier so that they will understand the material and pass. i also agree with you that the notion of these practices is completely ridiculous. i feel that nursing education should be challenging, and should prepare students for the real world as much as possible. students should be pushed, stressed, and stretched to the limit. my instructors don't make things easy, and they don't care if they hurt anyone's feelings either. they are great instructors, but they are tough and their expectations are high. some other groups don't have instrcutors with such high expectations, and, because of this, their classroom and clinical performance isn't nearly as good as my group's. some days i do get tired of being pushed so hard, but i remind myself that every day in a critical care unit will be a struggle, and that there will always be something to learn. i feel that when i graduate i will be ahead of many nursing students, and i feel that i will be able to better handle stress, adversity, and challenges because of the education i am receiving now. what you have written is the truth, and, as the saying goes, "the truth hurts." for those who feel entitled, for those who have failed out of a program, or for those who aren't in nursing school for the right reasons this statement is especially true.
  4. 1
    Quote from grntea
    "failing out of nursing school is not a rare thing, anymore. i predict that it's actually going to become a more frequent occurrence, because the schools stubbornly refuse to accept that the curriculum must change to fit the changing demographic of the current and future pool of students."

    i spend a good deal of time trying my best to help nursing students understand things they'll need as nurses because they're not getting it from their faculty somehow. however, i would not accept the premise that the curriculum must change to fit the changing demographic of the current and future pool of students if, as i see so often here and, as my friends in college education constantly bemoan, that demographic is increasingly characterized by illiteracy, innumeracy, and an overblown sense of entitlement. maybe it's a consequence of everyone in the junior soccer league getting the huge trophy for just showing up, even if the team never won a game; maybe it's decades of too much self-esteem workshops for parents. but dumbing-down nursing school because it's too hard for some people is a bad idea on so many levels it's hard to know where to start.

    the fact is that nursing is much more academically challenging now than it was a generation (or even half a generation) ago. patients are sicker, too. no longer will there be only one or two ivs on a med-surg floor, or someone who needs vs more often than twice a shift go to the icu. nurses need stronger critical thinking skills and organizational skills. they need better math skills, better assessment skills, and a better science education. that takes harder work than some students are prepared for or, in some cases, willing to do.

    students have to learn science, technology and pharmacology, of course, but even more, they need to truly understand the science, pharmacology or technology, the rationales for its use, and its limitations. else we will continue to be treated to sights i see almost every time i set foot in a hospital or review a record for a legal case: nurses relying on dynamaps without understanding why their wrong placement of the cuffs makes their readings worthless; a patient continuing to get heparin and enoxaparin for days ("what's the big deal? we give heparin and coumadin at the same time all the time!"); a cardiac patient with angina and a hgb of 6 is just fine "because his spo2 is 90, and that's good, right?" to mention a few. (if any of these make you wonder what my problem with them is, please let me explain...)

    i am truly sorry that someone who puts three semesters into nursing school finds that s/he is failing at the end of his/her fourth semester; it's hard to want something so bad and not be able to achieve it. i also hear the snarky behind "oh, it's that classic instructor-speak-- if the student is failing, it's not our fault." fact is, though, most of the class is not failing. sometimes you meet your limits, and it sounds as if this student, regretfully, has met them. there's a reason nursing school is hard. "if caring were enough, anyone could be a nurse" isn't just a slogan.
    the fact that i failed one test by 6 points at the end of my fourth semester does not mean that i have reached my limit. i refuse to accept the fact that one test could mean the end of my nursing career. i don't think it's fair to make that statement. the majority of students in my program have cheated their way through. at least i know that when i reach the end and graduate that i will not kill someone while i'm in practice.

    leesha
    Faith2012 likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from mattmrn2013
    Thank you so much for this! You hit the nail right on the head in every aspect that you covered. I am only 19, but I feel blessed to have gotten into a nursing progarm. My program was incredibly competitive, and many people did not get acceptance letters. My first semester is about to come to a close, and I am anxiously awaiting second semester. I have heard that second semester and beyond is much more in depth as far as pathophysiology, pharmacology, and science goes, and I can't wait for that. I want to be a surgical ICU nurse after I graduate, and I hope to work in an ICU as a new grad. Because of this, I am fascinated by the complex aspects of the human body, and I can't wait to begin learning. I know some things, but there is so much that I don't know. I want to be as prepared as possible when I do graduate because I want a job in ICU so badly. I agree with you that many students feel entitled, and many feel that nursing should be made easier so that they will understand the material and pass. I also agree with you that the notion of these practices is completely ridiculous. I feel that nursing education should be challenging, and should prepare students for the real world as much as possible. Students should be pushed, stressed, and stretched to the limit. My instructors don't make things easy, and they don't care if they hurt anyone's feelings either. They are great instructors, but they are tough and their expectations are high. Some other groups don't have instrcutors with such high expectations, and, because of this, their classroom and clinical performance isn't nearly as good as my group's. Some days I do get tired of being pushed so hard, but I remind myself that every day in a critical care unit will be a struggle, and that there will always be something to learn. I feel that when I graduate I will be ahead of many nursing students, and I feel that I will be able to better handle stress, adversity, and challenges because of the education I am receiving now. What you have written is the truth, and, as the saying goes, "the truth hurts." For those who feel entitled, for those who have failed out of a program, or for those who aren't in nursing school for the right reasons this statement is especially true.
    I agree that nursing school is difficult and is teaching nurses to be prepared for what life will be like once they get into their practice. However I do not think it is fair to include people that fail the program with people that are not in it for the right reasons. People fail for a variety of reasons and that does not mean that they want things handed to them. Being that you are so early in the program can account for many of your feelings but believe me it does get much more difficult and rigorous and you haven't even begun to experience the "burn out" that is sure to come. I don't agree at all that nursing programs should be curved in any way to make things easier (I know you didn't say that....I'm just commenting on whoever did say it). That would just put patients at risk which is the opposite of what we are doing and is just plain ignorant. The fact that the nursing programs are difficult helps to weed out people that are not meant to be nurses. However that does not mean that people who fail do not have what it takes to be a nurse.

    Good luck to you

    Leesha
  6. 2
    I just wanted to give an update on my situation. I found out that I only have to repeat the class that I failed in 4th semester and not the entire semester. Since finding that out I have decided to swallow my pride and register to take it again in the Spring and hopefully finish successfully!!! I want to say thanks to those of you that were supportive I really appreciate your advice and kind words
    WordWrangler and Faith2012 like this.
  7. 0
    Yeah Leesha ... good for you. Stick with it and you will be successful Much luck to you on a successful spring semester!
  8. 0
    good luck!:heartbeat if you graduate and pass nclex in the long run no one will know or care, so work hard.
  9. 0
    * I have gone to college 6 years as well* I ended up leaving an RN Pre Program and went full blast into an LPN program, I barely squeaked by first semester ( getting a .5 above what was needed) and then FAILED by 2 points MED SURGE. I was devastaed, I cried for days, slept away the days ( I also happended to lose my job at the same time- and I was just working in retail, and then to top all it off my Pappy passed away ( he raised me). So I took a semester off of school. managed to find 2 jobs, and just worked and reapplied to the program. Taking a breather is *definatly* <--- yes i know its spelled wrong =) worth it. I reapplied and 1 week before class started I revieved my acceptance letter. I managed to regroup, make friends and *really* learn how to study and apply my nursing knowledge, I ended up getting a 87 B in Medsurge and a 90 B in OB/Psych/Peds. Just give yourself a breather, relax, pray and smile! *YOU are an LPN* Thats more than some peopple will ever achieve in life!. Like right now, I am studying for the NCLEX. But allnurses.com is *much more helpful haha* Best wishes to you!

    By the way there is an online LPN to RN school at indiana state university- you wouldn't have to attend classes , just attend them online =)

    *God Bless and remember to CONTINUE your DREAM, regroup and tell yourself. I WILL become an RN. * Trust me, you can do it !*
  10. 0
    * Just read the update.* ignore my last comment haha.
    Good Luck and remember *YOU can do it!*


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