Dropping like flies....now I know why - page 3

We are half-way through the semester, and out of 52, we have lost 6 students and a meeting will be held next week by the instructors with students that are not doing well, and some will be encouraged... Read More

  1. by   telegirl17
    Hi, So just wondering what you say about students that are truly studying their butts off and still have not passed a exam. We have seven exam and I have not passed one yet. I study everyday, I read the boxes, understand the learning outcomes, understand content and do average on the practice test. Any advice? The professor at our school are telling us we need to withdrawl if we are not passing due to statistic...........worried about there program I guess. Help, I truly am putting my heart into it.
  2. by   intuition
    To Tele Girl..... Do you have test anxiety maybe? It sounds as if you are doing the right things but screw up at the test section. I can only give you one of my study hints, I know it's going to sound redundant but I write out an outline of the keypoints in the text. I find if I write things out, its stays in my head longer and I understand it easier. I hope this helps. Also I recommend looking up info on test anxiety and what you can do to help with that.
  3. by   telegirl17
    Intuition, Hi thanks for your responds. Yes, I have test anxiety for sure. When I get my test back I miss all the ones 1-25. My professor said that was a true sign of test aniexty. I have done everything I can to overcome it but I just can't get seem to get away from it. Also, that is what I do. I write, write, and write until my hand is about to fall off. It really helps me as well. I am just really frust. with not doing well especially since I study my like butt off. Thanks again for you advice. Telegirl~:trout:
  4. by   mrs.captain.kangaroo
    We had something 'strange' with tests happen at our school. We had a number of students who were failing or barely passing. The class average was a low C, and some people were getting Bs & As. They were complaining that it wasn't fair for sometime, very angry and then they went to faculty with their complaints.

    Since that time, our tests have been quite a bit easier and the class average is a B. Not sure what to think about that because it almost seems like grade inflation and I wonder what that says about our program. I have passed all the tests with a C and a couple Bs but now I am getting As. Would you worry about your program's quality if this happened, I wonder if they are under pressure to pass people?
  5. by   User123456
    i think the whole point is, and this is a point i dont think i totally appreciated till i returned to college as an adult student, is that the teachers are there to give you the tools and guidence to make choices and decisions on your own. they are teaching you to weight your options and make an informed safe choice that wont kill someone. the people who study just to pass a test arent really getting the point. not every situation is the same and just learning to pass a test wont help you in real life. you need to learn the rational behind questions and reasons for their answers. because an answer for one person can be differant for another even in the same situations. the point is its not the teachers fault if people are dropping like flies. we get the tools and its our job to learn and practice using them. besides i wouldnt want a nurse who just studied to pass a test working on me. lol
  6. by   llg
    Quote from mrs.captain.kangaroo
    We had something 'strange' with tests happen at our school. We had a number of students who were failing or barely passing. The class average was a low C, and some people were getting Bs & As. They were complaining that it wasn't fair for sometime, very angry and then they went to faculty with their complaints.

    Since that time, our tests have been quite a bit easier and the class average is a B. Not sure what to think about that because it almost seems like grade inflation and I wonder what that says about our program. I have passed all the tests with a C and a couple Bs but now I am getting As. Would you worry about your program's quality if this happened, I wonder if they are under pressure to pass people?
    I think your interpretation of the situation is probably pretty close to the truth. They may have re-evaluated the tests and decided to improve the quality a bit -- but they are also probably trying to make things a little easier for the students to avoid having to deal with the consequences of a lot of terrible grades. I'll bet "the truth" is somewhere in the middle of all the possible explanations.

    ... a little improvement in the teaching ... a little improvement in the tests ... a little "dumbing down" to cater to the students who can't handle a tougher course.

    I'm a teacher for a class that did fairly well on the first test and badly on the second test (though a few people failed both tests and a few people got A's on both tests). I am in the process of writing the lecture and the questions for the third test. What should I do? Assume the poor grades on the second test were all my fault? .... or all the students' fault? ..... or a little of both?

    I'm going to do my best to write a decent lecture and a fair test, trying to be as clear as I can with expressing the key points that will be covered in the test -- probably making it a little easier for the students in the process, but trying to include a few questions that are tough enough to discriminate between those students who really know their stuff and those who don't. Then I'll let the grades fall where they fall.
  7. by   llg
    Quote from trendynursingstudent
    i think the whole point is, and this is a point i dont think i totally appreciated till i returned to college as an adult student, is that the teachers are there to give you the tools and guidence to make choices and decisions on your own. they are teaching you to weight your options and make an informed safe choice that wont kill someone. the people who study just to pass a test arent really getting the point. not every situation is the same and just learning to pass a test wont help you in real life. you need to learn the rational behind questions and reasons for their answers. because an answer for one person can be differant for another even in the same situations. the point is its not the teachers fault if people are dropping like flies. we get the tools and its our job to learn and practice using them. besides i wouldnt want a nurse who just studied to pass a test working on me. lol
    by jove ... i think you've got it! the role of a nursing education is not just to teach you factual knowledge about specific things. it is to teach you how to analyze situations and make good decisions with the the factual knowledge that you have available. some students just don't "get that" and believe that it should be sufficient to memorize a few things and repeat the facts on a test. if that's all you can do, you won't be a good nurse.
  8. by   User123456
    yay!!!
  9. by   SarasotaRN2b
    Quote from trendynursingstudent
    i think the whole point is, and this is a point i dont think i totally appreciated till i returned to college as an adult student, is that the teachers are there to give you the tools and guidence to make choices and decisions on your own. they are teaching you to weight your options and make an informed safe choice that wont kill someone. the people who study just to pass a test arent really getting the point. not every situation is the same and just learning to pass a test wont help you in real life. you need to learn the rational behind questions and reasons for their answers. because an answer for one person can be differant for another even in the same situations. the point is its not the teachers fault if people are dropping like flies. we get the tools and its our job to learn and practice using them. besides i wouldnt want a nurse who just studied to pass a test working on me. lol
    i, too, agree with this. when i had been accepted into nursing school way back straight out of high school, i was just not equipped or mature enough. as i have, hopefully, matured and returned back to school, i have been able to look at the educational process in a different way.

    i think that i actually prefer to have to put more critical thinking into finding an appropriate answer. while my goal for my prereqs was to excel with high grades, my goal for nursing school is to excel with a strong foundation and understand the concepts so that i can apply them when needed. do i want high grades, of course...but more importantly, i want to understand the material. i've taken any number of classes, gotten a's, but ask me now...forget it! if i get a c, but i understand the material and i understand where i fell short and how i can approve, i'll be alright.

    kris
  10. by   jewelshouse
    Speaking of making life decisions at the age of 18, I know I for one wasn't in any position to do it . . . I do find it kind of interesting that you have to be 21 to buy a drink but do you have to be a certain age to pass meds????

    Just some food for thought.
  11. by   RNDreamer
    I had what I considered a very difficult biology prof during the summer. He kept telling us that he wanted us to UNDERSTAND the material, not just MEMORIZE it. My thoughts were that he was being unreasaonable. I had to change my study pattern after failing the first exam with a 63. (I ended up with a B in his class).

    Anyway, this past week, I was taking a biology exam (I must take 2 semesters of Bio). This biology I had this past summer taught in a lecture/class discussion method. This semester's Bio prof uses powerpoint slides. We are so busy frantically writing down the info off the slides since he does't give much time before he moves on to the next slide, that it's hard to do that AND pay attention when he is talking. Everytime, he asks "Do you understand?", he is met with silence. Understand? We are took busy trying to write before you change the slide!!! Back to the exam: The questions were SO SPECIFIC that it was not enough to have GENERAL knowledge of the info, you had to UNDERSTAND the material. I am in a class full of first semester students who just came out of HS, who were stunned at the exam. However, I as took the exam, I had to laugh as I thought about my previous prof and was thankful that I had him (I also thank him for the 96% I got on my chem exam).

    HOWEVER, I did want to say this:
    -My biology professor admitted that he likes giving "hard exams", as he called it. He said that if he sees too many students getting As, he will make sure the next exam is much harder
    -I have had professors (at this school and at my prev. college) say that they have a limit to how many As they give out in a particular semester. At my first college, I actually had a prof say that if too many students get As, he will have to give some of them Bs by doing this: Let's say a typical A is 93-100...what he would do when too many students got As is this..Change the A range to something like 96-100, that way the students who got between 93 and 95 would get Bs instead.
    -One of my professors this semester actually said something to the effect of not wanting to give too many full credit points on our extra credit assignment because she has to limit the amount of "full credit" she gives out. HUH?


    Sometimes, I do believe that it IS the professor




    Quote from llg


    ....but trying to include a few questions that are tough enough to discriminate between those students who really know their stuff and those who don't. Then I'll let the grades fall where they fall.
  12. by   Jess_Missouri_RN
    Quote from traumaRUs
    llg - I did nursing school as an adult. However, I will say that when I did nursing school right out of high school, I was a major screw-up. One day I got fed up with school (with only one semester left to get my RN), quit going to class, joined the Navy and shipped out within 48 hours. Now mind you, I didn't DROP the classes, just quit going. Had a 0.7gpa when I decided 12 years later to go back. Needless to say I had to not only re-take every single class, I was "invited" to talk with just about instructor as to how I had rectified my earlier lifestyle choices! Ugh - talk about humbling.

    Sometimes I think that when we are a little younger we go into things w/o thinking things through. That was what happened in my case at least. Glad I grew up and wised up (to some extent anyway - lol).
    I did the exact same thing. Started nursing school when I was 19 and dropped after 1 semester - I wasn't mature enough for it, I know that now. I am now 31 and will be starting in January 2008. I am way more dedicated and serious about my education. I've taken 3 semesters at a community college and cant wait to start nursing.

    I wanted to be a nurse at 19 but I also wanted to do teen/young adult stuff and had I stayed I would have failed out anyway.
  13. by   eldragon
    I'm about to graduate December 11th, from an LPN program. We started with 26 students and have 9 remaining.

    Why? Many reasons.

    The first block we lost 2 students who really weren't academically prepared for nursing school.

    Second block we lost all the ones not serious enough for nursing school. The ones that studied for tests in their cars in the parking lot before class started, and expected to pass. The ones who had other obligations they weren't willing to give up for nursing school. The ones who tried to manage full-time jobs, kids, and husbands and nursing school, etc.

    The third block we lost some of our best students because one of our instructors went nuts. Really! She tried to fail everyone, and came really close. Everyone complained, of course, and she was transferred out of the program, but she did manage to fail 6 promising students.

    And the rest of us are graduating in December. There are one or two I didn't think would (should) make it, but will.

    I've remained an A - B student throughout, but not without a huge struggle. It's as if I walked through fire for an entire year. The third block, especially, was nothing short of a nightmare. We had to learn pharmacology in 3 weeks!

    This LPN program, which lasted one year (without breaks) seems more like a two-year course to me.

    I can't wait to say goodbye to my fellow students, none of whom I can say I connected with on a real level, and move on to the next step.

    Sad but true.

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