Diff. between RN & RNC?

  1. 0
    Hey I have seen a few nurses around that have the title RNC rather than RN. I understand it means Certified Registered Nurse, but what is the difference? Is there a difference in their skills or their ability to do certain prodcedures?
    Thanks!

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  2. 10 Comments...

  3. 0
    Quote from sistermike
    Hey I have seen a few nurses around that have the title RNC rather than RN. I understand it means Certified Registered Nurse, but what is the difference? Is there a difference in their skills or their ability to do certain prodcedures?
    Thanks!
    Hello, sistermike,

    RNC = Registered Nurse Certified

    Many on here are certified in Labor and Delivery, In Patient OB, EFM (electro-fetal monitoring), etc.

    It is a way of showing added excellence in a specialty area. Has no bearing on abilities or difference in skills. It is an honor to pass these national certification exams. Some hospitals will pay for this added certification. Also, the individual will be required to obtain continuing education hours to keep the certification.

    Now, there are so many certifications not only for RN, but, LPN, too. They all carry their own initials of designation.
  4. 0
    I was wondering about this, too, and am glad someone asked. So how does one go about earning these certifications? I realize a test is involved, but does one study independently for these, or does one have to take approved classes first, such as for ACLS? Is there a *great* website where I can learn about these things? I'm definitely interested in going into a specialty area, so I'm really wanting to start working towards these things asap, even while still in school if that's at all possible!
  5. 1
    Quote from ByTheLake
    I was wondering about this, too, and am glad someone asked. So how does one go about earning these certifications? I realize a test is involved, but does one study independently for these, or does one have to take approved classes first, such as for ACLS? Is there a *great* website where I can learn about these things? I'm definitely interested in going into a specialty area, so I'm really wanting to start working towards these things asap, even while still in school if that's at all possible!
    Hello, ByTheLake,

    Normally the nurse's interests lie in a certain specialty area. In order to become certified in an area, you would need experience in said area first. That is how you start the process. Many certification requirements are such that you must work a certain time ....... full time in the specialty in which you seek the added excellence ...... for 'X' many years/hours.

    What area interests you? I have links to all types certifications/organizations and the like.
    queenofangels likes this.
  6. 0
    certification is just a feather in your nursing cap. it is not the same as state licensure. it requires you take and pass a national test given by the american nurses association which indicates that you are especially qualified as an rn. no one has to do this. it is something people chose to do for the status of having this distinction. i have not often seen that having this gets you a larger salary.


    http://www.nursingworld.org/ancc/ - this is the site of the american nurses credentialing center of the american nurses association. if you run your mouse over "certification & cert. renewal" a drop down menu appears. click on "certifications available" and you will get a page of the certifications offered. down toward the bottom you will see the categories of rn,c (registered nurse, certified) that you can take a test for. from the information at this site for an rn,c in medical surgical nursing, these are the basic eligibility requirements they list in order to qualify to take the examination to earn this certification:
    hold a currently active registered nurse license in the united states or its territories;
    have practiced the equivalent of two years full-time as a registered nurse in the united states or its territories;
    hold a baccalaureate or higher degree in nursing;
    have a minimum of 2,000 hours of clinical practice within the last three years (see items a and b below), unless specified in criteria specific to the specialty areas listed on the following pages; and
    have had 30 contact hours within the last three years.

    there are links to exam information on the right side of the page that you should check out. also check out the faqs.

    i once got my rn,c and knew at that time that they were going to require a bachelor's degree in nursing to take this exam. you will note, at their web site, however, that they still list this credential under aa nursing. however, when you check the eligibility requirements, it clearly states that you must have a bachelor's degree. at the time i took the credentialing test, it was a paper and pencil test that lasted 4 hours and was given on a saturday at a local university. i believe it cost a couple of hundred dollars to take the test. the test was pretty much based on what you have learned as a practicing nurse, so you really need experience as a hospital rn to take this test. there were, however, questions on administrative kinds of things as well including quality improvement, etc.
  7. 0
    I might point out there are other entities that certify the nurse. Not just the ANA.

    NCC (National Certification Corporation) is the major one nationally certifying those in OB/GYN/In House L&D/Fetal Monitoring/WHNP, etc.

    Other entities are certifying bodies as well. And, as I pointed out earlier, the LPN may receive certification in many areas that are not under the auspices of the ANA or NCC.
  8. 0
    Thanks so much for all your info! I stayed up *way* too late last night, but was able to find lots of info on how to earn the certifications, including the ones I'm interested in. Looks like I will not be able to apply to take the tests until I have quite some time of clinical experience, but at least I know what i have to do from the start, so I'm focused on that goal at all times, kwim? You guys are so fabulous. Thanks again!
  9. 0
    Yay! More good info! I'll google them and see what their requirements and stuff are for certification. The more options the better, so I can find out what would be best for me. Thank you!
  10. 0
    Quote from siri
    What area interests you? I have links to all types certifications/organizations and the like.
    I'm interested in working in either L&D or ED, but will wait until after OB rotation this coming semester to either confirm or rule that out. Will eventually go on to become CNM, but not until my children are a bit older (I'd like to have one or two more first as well ;-)

    Right now I'm focusing on just getting through nursing school, but I like knowing what I should be working towards now, especially when I have 4 glorious weeks off and have time to ponder ;-)
  11. 0
    Quote from ByTheLake
    I'm interested in working in either L&D or ED, but will wait until after OB rotation this coming semester to either confirm or rule that out. Will eventually go on to become CNM, but not until my children are a bit older (I'd like to have one or two more first as well ;-)

    Right now I'm focusing on just getting through nursing school, but I like knowing what I should be working towards now, especially when I have 4 glorious weeks off and have time to ponder ;-)
    Very good, ByTheLake,

    Nice goals there. Good luck in all that you do.


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