Can someone answer an urgent question about injections?

  1. My test about injections is in 36 hours.. And I have a problem with what my teacher told us versus what the manual says.

    I am European, so I might not know the correct terms for all the parts of the syringe, so please bear with me...

    We were told, if we were right handed, to hold the needle with our right hand to put it trough the skin, than take over with our left hand to hold it steady, and use our right hand to (in dutch it is aspireren, check if we aren't in a vein, and inject), hold a little cloth between the pink and ting finger of our left hand, and when we are done injecting, take the cloth with our right hand, push it to the skin, and pull the needle out with our left hand.

    IN the manual it says to push it in with right, take over in the left, and then to take over again, so we can take the needle out with our right hand.

    THis might sound confused, silly and rambling, but how do you do it????
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   woody436
    Well, if I read your post correctly...I'll attempt to provide an answer...using a dart-like motion with your dominant hand, insert the needle into the muscle (assuming it is indeed an intra-muscular injection). Steady the barrell of the syringe (the fat part) with the non-dominant hand or use your your thumb and index finger to hold the flange and pull back on the plunger to aspirate (aspireren). There's a certain amount of technique when using a one handed approach to aspirating and it only comes with time.
  4. by   eandgsma
    If you are being tested by the instructor, do it like the instructor told you to. They are the one grading you.

    I'm assuming you are talking about Intramuscular injections? If so, I hold with right hand and inject needle into skin, stabalize with left hand and aspirate with right hand, then inject medication with right hand, remove needle with right hand. That is how I was taught with my instructor and that is how I was tested. I passed the first time.

    Good luck!
  5. by   Purkje
    Ok, so far I get it, but what then?

    One teacher tells us to use our non-dominant hand to pull the needle back out, the other tells us to swith hands again and use the dominant hand
  6. by   cardiacRN2006
    Ok, I've read your post a few times, and I think I get your question.

    I don't remember how the book says to do it, but if I'm right handed, I don't like pulling the syringe out with my left hand. It seems too complicated. I'd put the needle in with the R hand, stablize it with L, aspirate with right, push med with R and pull out needle with R, and then use gauze with the left.

    But the few IMs I've given were only vitamins, in very small syrings, so I can do it all with just my right hand.
  7. by   Purkje
    Thank you!!! we may get any instructor that teaches our school, so not just our teacher.

    Retracting with my left hand was difficult for me so I am relieved now.
  8. by   mrod
    I would also do what the instructor told you too, BUT I would strongly suggest that you practice this tonight with a pen or something to simulate b/c tomorrow when you take the exam you might get confused on what you thought was right and what was right but if you had a visual, you might think of it and nail the question.
  9. by   Daytonite
    Quote from purkje
    we were told, if we were right handed, to hold the needle with our right hand to put it trough the skin, than take over with our left hand to hold it steady, and use our right hand to (in dutch it is aspireren, check if we aren't in a vein, and inject), hold a little cloth between the pink and ting finger of our left hand, and when we are done injecting, take the cloth with our right hand, push it to the skin, and pull the needle out with our left hand.
    i have been giving injections for years and do exactly what you were told, except for the part that i highlighted in red. i don't know why they would tell you to suddenly switch these two objects into your opposite hands! that makes no sense to me. i keep the alcohol pledget (cloth) in my left hand, pull the needle out with my right hand, which is already holding the syringe, while pushing the alcohol pledget (cloth) down firmly on the injection puncture.
  10. by   firstyearstudent
    Quote from Purkje
    take the cloth with our right hand, push it to the skin, and pull the needle out with our left hand.
    If I am understanding you correctly, this maneuver has a high potential for self-stick. I like to keep my hands away from the needle when it is coming out (and my eyes on it!).
  11. by   Daytonite
    Quote from firstyearstudent
    If I am understanding you correctly, this maneuver has a high potential for self-stick. I like to keep my hands away from the needle when it is coming out (and my eyes on it!).
    The only way you're going to stick yourself is if, after you pull the needle out, you stop the direction your hand with the syringe is moving (which is backward and out of the patient at that point), change your direction and now push the syringe back down so the needle ends up in one of your fingers!
  12. by   firstyearstudent
    Quote from Daytonite
    The only way you're going to stick yourself is if, after you pull the needle out, you stop the direction your hand with the syringe is moving (which is backward and out of the patient at that point), change your direction and now push the syringe back down so the needle ends up in one of your fingers!
    I guess I'm just a paranoid student. I always pull the needle out with the left hand at least an inch away (still pinching at this point), put the safety on (or put it in the sharps container if within reaching distance), then turn my attention to the puncture site and put pressure on it.
  13. by   RNursingStudent
    "Methods are many, but principles are few." a wise woman has said many times.
    Each instructor is going to have their own method. As long as you are doing your check off with the right priciples and keeping everything "safe", then you should be fine. If it's for a written test, read the question carefully and evaluate each senario to knock out the answers that contradict what you know is the right "safe" way. Good luck!
  14. by   RN BSN 2009
    Right! Be sure to know what is the best method for you to do, and the method your instructors want you to know!

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