Advice for Practicum?!?!?!?!?!?

  1. 0
    Hi All,

    Took my last final for the semester today, passed all classes graduation in May. I also found out I'm going to be on an Hematology floor/unit at a children's hospital for practicum...super excited (one of my top 5 choices).

    I have never had a problem with any clinical instructor or the learning experience (knock on wood), and I dont want one with my future practicum. I know some clinical instructors will/can fail a student based on their clinical performance. A clinical instructor failed a guy in my class because they didn't get along :-/.

    I guess I'm just a little worried b/c we are kinda on our own for practicum.

    Any advice is welcomed

    Thanks
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  3. 5 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    Now that you know what types of patients you will be seeing, read up on blood disorders in that age group. Take a cheat sheet to the practicum regarding blood and Rh types. Prepare questions ahead of time and try to get them answered while there. Volunteer to assist any staff member, nurse or not, if you have time. EVERYTHING is a learning experience. Be prepared and be flexible and you will do fine.
    procrastinator911 and GrnTea like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from classicdame
    Now that you know what types of patients you will be seeing, read up on blood disorders in that age group. Take a cheat sheet to the practicum regarding blood and Rh types. Prepare questions ahead of time and try to get them answered while there. Volunteer to assist any staff member, nurse or not, if you have time. EVERYTHING is a learning experience. Be prepared and be flexible and you will do fine.
    Thank u...i think i will definitely make cheat sheets
  6. 0
    Quote from procrastinator911
    Hi All,

    . . . . A clinical instructor failed a guy in my class because they didn't get along :-/.
    Yea, right. Every school has a ton of these 'myths'. Instructors are held to very specific standards to avoid any claims of discrimination/unfairness. I can pretty much guarantee that there was much more to this story - but records are confidential, so all you heard was his story.
  7. 0
    Well, I beg to differ. I am aware of more than a few situations where personality and immaturity on the side of a clinical instructor caused problems. I witnessed a few as they unfolded and really was amazed.

    Usually there is a lack of "understanding" on the part of the instructor about the real world and it's quite easy to put an end to all of it with excellent documentation by the student... and one phone call to legal counsel. No need to involve the peanut gallery in the college nursing department. Best to "blind side" so nobody has a chance to retroactively fabricate if you know what I mean.

    So, OP not to worry - just document if anything starts to seem not ready for prime time so if you need to use it, it's there ready to go. This way you can just concentrate on doing a great job while you are finishing school.
  8. 0
    Know what you know, and ask if you have doubts. Nothing is worse than a know-it-all student. So long as you go in with an open mind and a willingness to learn and get your hands dirty, you should be fine. Jump in whenever you can, don't hang back or be afraid to get involved, your preceptor will let you know when you need to sit one out. And don't argue...all nurses do things a little bit differently, just because they do something differently than you did it in school, doesn't make it wrong.

    We get our students next week, I am looking forward to having an extra hand around the ER!


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