Accelerated BSN vs. BSN/ADN for 2nd degree student

  1. I'm a year away from completing a BA in Spanish and after graduation (and getting married) I'm planning to go to nursing school. I started doing research on different schools in March and thought the accelerated BSN program would be a nice fit, since I'd only need to be in school for 1-2 years. However, these are only offered in certain areas and I'm not sure where I want to go to school. Part of me wants to be closer to California, where I'm from, but part of me loves the midwest and wants to stay in the Kansas City area.

    I know my options for schools will open dramatically if I opt for a regular BSN or ADN degree instead. My concern, however, is I want to be able to use the prereqs I've already accumulated (and those I plan to take at a CC after graduation) toward my nursing degree. I KNOW this is possible for accelerated programs (since that's kind of their purpose), but will "regular" degree programs accept prereqs that were taken at another University and used toward another degree?

    If so, what's the advantage of doing the accelerated program?

    --Confused Meghan
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   orrnlori
    Of course they will accept them as long as they are from an accredited college and they fit within the description of the class you are trying to get substituted. Every once in a while you may find a stinker school who wants to put up a fuss about a certain class, but on the flip side, they also want students! But your basic core classes should transfer well, especially all the university requirement core classes you've already done. As far as an accelerated school that only takes one year to become a nurse, I don't know about these and would have to wonder. However, two years to complete either a BSN or AAS should turn out of good nurse.
  4. by   TopCat1234
    in the off chance that i do not get into either direct entry msn or accelerated bsn programs that i'm looking at, i have researched the two local adn programs. at my two adn schools, the ge requirements are automatically waived because i will (a/o july 2004) already have a bachelor's. i just need to complete the pre-reqs (which i am doing this summer) and the core nursing classes.

    i would think that would be the same elsewhere, but check with the programs you are looking at.

    topcat
  5. by   PennyLane
    Quote from orrnlori
    Of course they will accept them as long as they are from an accredited college and they fit within the description of the class you are trying to get substituted. Every once in a while you may find a stinker school who wants to put up a fuss about a certain class, but on the flip side, they also want students! But your basic core classes should transfer well, especially all the university requirement core classes you've already done. As far as an accelerated school that only takes one year to become a nurse, I don't know about these and would have to wonder. However, two years to complete either a BSN or AAS should turn out of good nurse.
    I'm in a 16 month accelerated BSN program, and we have the same requirements as the two year BSN students. The main difference is that we take more credits per semester and we take a couple of classes over the summer. So they squeeze the same curriculum in 4 semesters over 16 months.
  6. by   Megsd
    Quote from Mel D
    I'm in a 16 month accelerated BSN program, and we have the same requirements as the two year BSN students. The main difference is that we take more credits per semester and we take a couple of classes over the summer. So they squeeze the same curriculum in 4 semesters over 16 months.
    Hmm, so it sounds like the only real difference is 16 months (in your case) as opposed to 24.

    I think I may start looking at more general BSN programs, then. I've tried to get info from my current University about their nursing program, but despite e-mailing/calling to have info sent to me, I have yet to receive ANYTHING. It's frustrating!! :angryfire

    Meghan
  7. by   PennyLane
    Quote from Megsd
    Hmm, so it sounds like the only real difference is 16 months (in your case) as opposed to 24.

    I think I may start looking at more general BSN programs, then. I've tried to get info from my current University about their nursing program, but despite e-mailing/calling to have info sent to me, I have yet to receive ANYTHING. It's frustrating!! :angryfire

    Meghan
    You may want to just go over there and pick up an admissions packet. You may even get to talk to an admissions counselor. Or see if they have an open house day coming up.
  8. by   Purdue725
    I have a BS in Business from Purdue and graduated in May 2002. I have been taking my pre-reqs since 2004 and I have applied to 3 ABSN out here in NJ. Unfortunately, I didnt get in one of them, the second one I dont qualify cause I have to take another class (Dev. Psych) and the 3rd school, I am waiting to hear from them which is UMDNJ.

    Now it is totally frustrating not getting into nursing school. It seems that all these schools are just wanting to make money and give us a hard time to get into the programs. What surprises me is that there is a shortage yet not enough spaces for students in these programs. I just dont get it!

    I also applied to 2 other schools to get into their school and then get into the nursing program which could take another year before I am in. And I havent even taken the waiting list or the money situation in consideration.

    Also what sucks is that most of these programs are at least 2-4 classes different from each other. And some of these schools require the NLN, TEAS, HESI or the NET. So really, what should one do, take all of those tests and take ALL the pre-reqs and then apply? Its frustrating, time consuming and money sucking scheme. And all what we want to do is help people and take care of them. And all these schools care about is to make money...

    So I have decided to apply to some local community colleges out in Dallas area (my boyfriend is out there) and some local community colleges in Florida. Doing your ASN is MUCH cheaper and since you already have a BA it doesnt make sense to do another Bachelors again.

    Now the downside of ASN is waiting lists and you have to take different entrance exams to get into the program which I find it silly.

    Dont give up and keep at it. Search for programs and stick to them! Best of luck...
  9. by   karmyk
    Quote from Megsd
    I started doing research on different schools in March and thought the accelerated BSN program would be a nice fit, since I'd only need to be in school for 1-2 years. However, these are only offered in certain areas and I'm not sure where I want to go to school. Part of me wants to be closer to California...
    If you don't mind the cost of a private school education, there are several colleges California that offer the Accelerated BSN (Samuel Merritt College and Mount St. Mary's College are the first two that come to mind)... there are also several public universities in California that offer an entry-level MSN that's only about 18 or so months long and are designed to have you train to be a nurse leader and obtain your RN without specializing in an advanced practice (Sonoma State and CSU-SF are the ones that come to mind at the moment).

    Your major in Spanish will definately help, since fluency in Spanish will be extremely helpful out here in California.

    I know my options for schools will open dramatically if I opt for a regular BSN or ADN degree instead. My concern, however, is I want to be able to use the prereqs I've already accumulated (and those I plan to take at a CC after graduation) toward my nursing degree.
    There shouldn't be too much of a problem transferring courses from an accredited college or university... BUT once you choose the programs you're interested in, I highly recommend that you contact an admissions counselor of that program ASAP in order to verify that the classes you're taking are transferable.

    If so, what's the advantage of doing the accelerated program?
    I'd probably say (based on what I've heard) that the biggest advantage is the time you're completing it in. I spoke to some students in the Samuel Merritt College ABSN program, which is 12 months long, and they say that one of the biggest things that keeps them motivated when things are getting UBER-stressful is knowing that it's all going to be over in a few months, and they can finally take their NCLEX and get out there and work.

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