A question about a Practice calculation question...

  1. I was practicing calculation and IV rates for my next exam and I'm stuck on this question....

    The physician prescribes the Low Dose Heparin Protocol. The Protocol indicates that the patient should receive an initial bolus of 60 units per kilogram followed by a continuous IV drip of 10 units per kilogram per hour. The patient weighs 198 pounds. Heparin comes in a vial with 10,000 units in 10 ml and in a bag with 25,000 units in 250ml of normal saline.

    How many ml of Heparin will the nurse administer for the initial bolus? 5.4ml

    How fast will the nurse set the pump for the continuous IV drip of Heparin?


    I was able to figure out the first part of the question. Well, I least I think I did it right but I'm having problem with the second one. Does anyone know how to do this? Any help would be greatly appreciated!
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   neneRN
    First, figure out your pt's hourly dosage for the drip. (90kg x 10 Units =.....)

    Next figure out what your concentration in the bag is (25,000units/ 250cc=....how many units per CC)


    Once you get to that point, should look a little easier. If not, see below.

    Different Ex. Your pt needs 500Units/hour and there are 100Units/cc...so it would be at 5cc/hr, right
  4. by   Daytonite
    The physician prescribes the Low Dose Heparin Protocol. The Protocol indicates that the patient should receive an initial bolus of 60 units per kilogram followed by a continuous IV drip of 10 units per kilogram per hour. The patient weighs 198 pounds. Heparin comes in a vial with 10,000 units in 10 ml and in a bag with 25,000 units in 250ml of normal saline.
    How many ml of Heparin will the nurse administer for the initial bolus? 5.4ml
    By dimensional analysis:

    The final desired label you want is mL. Here is the set up:
    60units / 1kg (dose desired) X 10mL / 10,000units (dose on hand--the vial) X 198lb (weight of patient) X 1kg / 2.2lb (conversion factor) = 5.4mL (after doing math and factoring out duplicated labels in numerators and denominators)
    How fast will the nurse set the pump for the continuous IV drip of Heparin?
    By dimensional analysis:

    The final desired label you want is mL.
    10units / 1kg (dose desired) X 250mL / 25,000units (dose on hand--IV bag) X 198lbs (weight of patient) X 1kg / 2.2lb (conversion factor) = 9mL
    This will be 900units of heparin per hour. The infusion pumps will be set at 9mL per hour. To double check this divide the 25,000units by 250cc to get 100units of heparin per mL of solution. If the patient weighs 198lbs, or 90kg (198 divided by 2.2) then 90kg at 10unit per kg per is 900units per hour.
  5. by   Nili927
    Thank you so much for your help! :flowersfo
    I'm happy to know that I answered the 1st question right. Now for the second part I had already figured out the 900 units by multiplying the weight by 10 units.... I was confused on the 25000unit 250ml part.
    It's a relief to know that I was on the right track! I will be practicing some more this weekend. I want to be ready for this exam!:studyowl:
  6. by   passionate
    and by doing that you will be ready when the "exam" is a real patient. Keep up the good studying.
  7. by   jillmack11
    10 units times 90 kg = 900 u/kg then u set up your ratios :
    25000/250 = 900/x
    25000x = 225000 x = 9 units/hr
  8. by   Babs0512
    I'm with everyone else 900 units/hr.

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