Why do so many nurses seem to dislike working in Med/Surg - page 5

I've been reading this board for a while and Med/Surg seems to be the place that most people (no everyone) pay their dues and try to get out. What's the deal?... Read More

  1. by   scooterRN52
    Quote from LovePeaceJoy
    I've been reading this board for a while and Med/Surg seems to be the place that most people (no everyone) pay their dues and try to get out.

    What's the deal?
    Med-surg is a lot of work w/ high accuity patients. It requires good organizational skills and being able to prioritize an assignement of 6-10 patients or more depending on where you work. I have found a specialty hospital that offers a very low ratio of patients to nurses, I work 7p-7a and usually I have 3-5 patients and we have cna's also. Our unit is monitored w/
    telemetry and we have extensive surgery pts.
  2. by   LPNer
    Quote from TexasNS
    I work on a med/surg floor and today I saw a Dub-Hoff tube inserted and 30 minuetes later went to check the patient and the tube was sticking out an old peg site...................havn't seen that before .

    I love working med/surg it is fun to watch the unorganized nurse spin in a circle half the day.
    I would love to have seen the Dub-Hoff coming out the peg site! Just too funny!

    And, so is watching the disorganized nurse who still tries to gather a million or so pieces of paper for each pt she is assigned to instead of just getting out there and taking care of them! We have nurses on our ortho unit who spend the day gathering up every single piece of paper they find (they have preliminary lab reports for every test done, they keep it even though everything was WNL!) and adding it to their clip boards. By the time they are ready to give report to us, they have to go through sheet after sheet after sheet! It's a riot.
    Why don't they just jot down the important stuff, the info that it particular to that pt and move on! They spend their whole shift trying to get organized? I love it! Starts every shift with a chuckle!
    But then on the down side of their attempt to have as much paper on each pt as they did on one pt as a student, they miss so many important things. Like taking care of a person for a full 8 hours and not noticing an amputation, or a hernia the size of Rhode Island. It's sad sometimes too.
  3. by   NoCrumping
    Quote from TexasNS
    I work on a med/surg floor and today I saw a Dub-Hoff tube inserted and 30 minuetes later went to check the patient and the tube was sticking out an old peg site...................havn't seen that before .

    I love working med/surg it is fun to watch the unorganized nurse spin in a circle half the day.
    Thats fun to you?
  4. by   scooterRN52
    Quote from TexasNS
    I work on a med/surg floor and today I saw a Dub-Hoff tube inserted and 30 minuetes later went to check the patient and the tube was sticking out an old peg site...................havn't seen that before .

    I love working med/surg it is fun to watch the unorganized nurse spin in a circle half the day.
    I don't think that is funny. :angryfire You are a nursing student?
  5. by   scooterRN52
    Quote from LPNer
    I would love to have seen the Dub-Hoff coming out the peg site! Just too funny!

    And, so is watching the disorganized nurse who still tries to gather a million or so pieces of paper for each pt she is assigned to instead of just getting out there and taking care of them! We have nurses on our ortho unit who spend the day gathering up every single piece of paper they find (they have preliminary lab reports for every test done, they keep it even though everything was WNL!) and adding it to their clip boards. By the time they are ready to give report to us, they have to go through sheet after sheet after sheet! It's a riot.
    Why don't they just jot down the important stuff, the info that it particular to that pt and move on! They spend their whole shift trying to get organized? I love it! Starts every shift with a chuckle!
    But then on the down side of their attempt to have as much paper on each pt as they did on one pt as a student, they miss so many important things. Like taking care of a person for a full 8 hours and not noticing an amputation, or a hernia the size of Rhode Island. It's sad sometimes too.
    It is a good thing you aren't a registered nurse, if so, I don't think you would find this funny. I take my license and practice seriously.
    Last edit by scooterRN52 on Mar 21, '05
  6. by   LPNer
    Quote from scooterRN52
    It is a good thing you aren't a registered nurse, if so, I don't think you would find this funny. I take my license and practice seriously.
    Give it a break.

    I TOTALLY understand the implications in the matter.

    But, unless you are a total stick in the mud who sees no humor in the human body and the way natural proccesses alter the way medical staff want things to go, then you will be one of those who burn out and just can't take it anymore!

    Come on, there is humor in putting the Dub-Hoff in just to see it let itself out!

    Do you realize what it took for that DH to get out? The peg site almost surely has an exterior puncture is not lined up with the puncture in the stomach. (Oh yea, I have years of experience with pegs and other g-tubes) That means the DH really had to "work" to get out! I can just see that DH navigating through the abdominal cavity to make it's way to freedom! If you can't see that, then I feel sorry for your pts, they certainly don't see the lighter side of their problems with you for a nurse. Remember, humor is the best medicine!

    And I would have approached it like... "well how in the world did that tube find it's way all the way out here!" as I took whatever steps were needed to stablize the situatioin. The first thing I would not do is allow the pt to think that is was anything to worry about, maybe if you were an LPN and had significant experience at the bedside, you would know that!
  7. by   scooterRN52
    Quote from LPNer
    Give it a break.

    I TOTALLY understand the implications in the matter.

    But, unless you are a total stick in the mud who sees no humor in the human body and the way natural proccesses alter the way medical staff want things to go, then you will be one of those who burn out and just can't take it anymore!

    Come on, there is humor in putting the Dub-Hoff in just to see it let itself out!

    Do you realize what it took for that DH to get out? The peg site almost surely has an exterior puncture is not lined up with the puncture in the stomach. (Oh yea, I have years of experience with pegs and other g-tubes) That means the DH really had to "work" to get out! I can just see that DH navigating through the abdominal cavity to make it's way to freedom! If you can't see that, then I feel sorry for your pts, they certainly don't see the lighter side of their problems with you for a nurse. Remember, humor is the best medicine!

    And I would have approached it like... "well how in the world did that tube find it's way all the way out here!" as I took whatever steps were needed to stablize the situatioin. The first thing I would not do is allow the pt to think that is was anything to worry about, maybe if you were an LPN and had significant experience at the bedside, you would know that!
    Excuse me, but I was an LPN for about 3 years before I became a RN. I have been doing bedside care for over 17 years, I currently work on a surgical
    stepdown unit, I take care of many patients who have had head, neck. and
    tongue surgery and they are unable to eat, so they require DH tubes. I can't
    imagine one of these patients w/ a DH that migrates to another orifice.
    All of our pt's are surgical w/ lung and esophageal surgery as well.

    Believe me I have found a lot of humor on our unit, I just don't think a tube finding its way out of the body in that manner is funny.
  8. by   LPNer
    Quote from scooterRN52
    Excuse me, but I was an LPN for about 3 years before I became a RN. I have been doing bedside care for over 17 years, I currently work on a surgical
    stepdown unit, I take care of many patients who have had head, neck. and
    tongue surgery and they are unable to eat, so they require DH tubes. I can't
    imagine one of these patients w/ a DH that migrates to another orifice.
    All of our pt's are surgical w/ lung and esophageal surgery as well.

    Believe me I have found a lot of humor on our unit, I just don't think a tube finding its way out of the body in that manner is funny.
    That's the type of unit I worked on right out of school, it was a great unit! Matter of fact, that unit was at the same hospital I work at now, though I have been all over the country between then and now.
    I see you do not like your abilities/knowledge questioned, just to let you know, neither do I, sat for my boards in 1977 and although life has not allowed me the money to further my formal education, it does not mean that I could not give you a run for your money on the knowledge. Yet, I am an LPN and proud to be one!
    I see humor in it, sorry you do not. I did not at any time say it was funny for the pt! I just think it is funny that despite our abilites, knowledge and intentions, the body can do some things all on its own. I see humor in that, sorry you don't.
  9. by   scooterRN52
    Quote from LPNer
    That's the type of unit I worked on right out of school, it was a great unit! Matter of fact, that unit was at the same hospital I work at now, though I have been all over the country between then and now.
    I see you do not like your abilities/knowledge questioned, just to let you know, neither do I, sat for my boards in 1977 and although life has not allowed me the money to further my formal education, it does not mean that I could not give you a run for your money on the knowledge. Yet, I am an LPN and proud to be one!
    I see humor in it, sorry you do not. I did not at any time say it was funny for the pt! I just think it is funny that despite our abilites, knowledge and intentions, the body can do some things all on its own. I see humor in that, sorry you don't.

    Thankyou for your reply.
  10. by   jbrynn2002
    Quote from LovePeaceJoy
    I've been reading this board for a while and Med/Surg seems to be the place that most people (no everyone) pay their dues and try to get out.

    What's the deal?
    I've heard this, too. I am going to work on a med/surg floor to get some much needed experience. Maybe after that I'll move to a specialty floor.
  11. by   LPNer
    Quote from jbrynn2002
    I've heard this, too. I am going to work on a med/surg floor to get some much needed experience. Maybe after that I'll move to a specialty floor.
    Specialty floors are often easier.
    Not because of pt acuity or lack of things to do. But becasue, as I've noticed in my almost 30 years working a large variety of areas, specialty areas have better defined policy, procedure, direction, pt needs, just everything is better defined.

    If you find yourself caring for an elderly gentleman in CVS for example, his diabetic issues are handled with a sliding scale, teaching will occur later, on a med/surg unit. His HTN can also be controlled with a well defined protocol. He can learn about management, later, on a med/surg unit. Renal insufficiency secondary to the other problems already listed? In the unit, there are defined protocols. Not to say this is not a good thing, it is! The defined proptocls for so many of the things makes care of the pt in any "unit" controlled (up to a point, things happen! that's why it's the "unit." But pt ratios make it so much easier to deal with.
    On the med/surg unit, the staff is trying to deal with blood sugars that will not stablize, but not so far out that they are shipped to the unit, the HTN is all over the board, while that pt just can't understand why they have to change their diet to maintain the bl sugars and bl press. Not to mention the reinforcement of teaching needed before he clogs his cardiac arteries up again! And we haven't even addressed that u/o of only 150cc/shift for the past 16 hours! And that is not going on with just 1 or 2 pts, it's going on with 4 - 6! And the guy in the room next door has a bed check "going off" every 4 or 5 minutes and the family refuses to permit restraints, but at the same time they spend more time outside smoking than in the room with him like the agreed to be! When will you get the time to take care of that!?

    Oh yea, med/surg is great, for nurses with huge hallos on their heads! My hallo is not so big thses days, thank God my regular floor is ortho (same problems but not nearly as bad, just like the unit, we have more defined protocol because they can always be shipped to rehab or med/surg to address the other issues on D/C from ortho.)

    Please, nobody should take this to mean I am saying "unit" work or other specialty areas never address these subjects, we do and I am sure you do too. But, we'd be lieing to ourselves if we tried to claim we don't use rehad and med/surg as our cure all as often as possible.
  12. by   Audreyfay
    Quote from JRRN
    The instructor stood up and told them that the reason the ICU existed was to save the patients from the mistakes made by the floor nurses.
    OMG! ! ! I can't believe that! I would have reported the instructor to the manager of ICU, as well as the education department head. Attitudes like that probably stimulated the negative attitudes of others!

    I worked for years and years in Med/Surg. Both in hospitals, and with nursing agencies in a few different states. I do have to say this, I really liked it as it used so many areas of my nursing knowledge. It also made me a very organized, mutli-tasking expert nurse. However, I don't think I have ever worked as physically hard anywhere else. All in all, I would not give my experiences as a M/S nurse up for the world! Keep it up you Med/Surg nurses. You are angels among us!
  13. by   Runman1914
    Med Surg is definitely the hardest nursing i've ever done.In med surg you take the flack for other depts in the hospital not doing their jobs. If the meal tray is wrong u are blamed, if resp is late u are blamed,if the dr doesnt come u are blamed, if physical therapy doesnt return to put the pt in bed its your fault,and i could give many more examples but in med surg you take alot blame for other dept and the families always come to you.I do er and icu now as a travel nurse and the stress is cut in half. Med surg is a great learning tool but i had to give it up. Not to mention med surg nurses are considered bottom of the food chain by other nurses . But i think every nurse should start there.
    Last edit by Runman1914 on Mar 22, '05

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