Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges? - page 6

I have never had anyone give me a straight answear to this question, Why do nurses wear there degree on the badge uniforms? I see few other people in the hospital setting that do it except for... Read More

  1. by   mcl4
    [My goal was to be a nurse first, because in my experience, the best doctors are often those who were nurses first. And, I can work at a hospital that offers tuition reimbursment. It might take me more time, but its worth it to me in the long run.

    A hospital will pay for med school. I question if they would do this? Most physicians enter med school and do not attend nursing school. How many physicians do you know that were previous nurses.


    To me, it IS a matter of pride. Everyone should be proud of the accomplishments they have made. What about jobs where "20 years of dedicated service" is printed on their badges? Not just nursing, other types of employees have that too. Should it not matter what time they have put in to their profession? Its not just about a statement of "job title". Its about pride and recognition of service and accomplishment. [/B][/QUOTE]


    Will have to agree to disagree on this one. I see a name badge for displaying a person's name, job title and used for security reasons. It is not meant to display one's sacraficies, pride or whatever you want to accomplish with recogition.
  2. by   nurs4kids
    Why do you guys keep arguing for your right to wear your credentials on your badges? YOU sacrificed the extra time, you EARNED the right to wear your credentials, quit worrying about the few who feel inferior because you've done more. If you'll notice, most of the people who are arguing against the credentials on name tags have THEIR credentials listed on this board as their user names.

    Brandy,
    I love your spunk, kiddo! I agree that you should be paid more because of your degree. You sacrificed more, you're more educated and your student loan will be a helluva lot more. In my area the differential is only 50 cents, which is not much motivation for a BSN. It should be more. Although I don't always agree with you, you're very articulate and open minded. Don't let someone try to tell you that because you're a student you have no right to an opinion (not that I think you would )!
  3. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by Susy K


    This goes without saying. I am not trying to be picky here, but obviously I am not going to sit there and rattle off the history of the suppressed nursing profession while my patient is in the process of getting an epidural placed, or while we are prepping her for an emergency C-section.

    Suppressed nursing profession?

    Patients DO have needs while in the hospital, and most of them pertain to direct bedside care. But in my opinion, I treat my patients wholistically, and that includes interacting with them on a friendly basis and enjoying conversation other than their disease process. Distraction is also a widely used pain relief measure.
    How often or many times have you explained your education history to a patient. It simply isn't something that is commonly discussed with patients. I enjoy a friendly conversation with patients, but we generally talk about their lives or their family, if they are comfortable in doing so, and not mine.
  4. by   mcl4
    . Don't let someone try to tell you that because you're a student you have no right to an opinion (not that I think you would )! [/B][/QUOTE]

    No one stated a person doesn't have a right to an opinon.
    But personally I do look at a person's experience when evaluating their opinon.
  5. by   Q.
    I also wear my nursing pin on my name badge. According to your argument, I am defeating the purpose of my name badge by displaying this pin.

    This is starting to not make a whole lot of sense at all.
  6. by   mcl4
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by nurs4kids
    [B]Why do you guys keep arguing for your right to wear your credentials on your badges? YOU sacrificed the extra time, you EARNED the right to wear your credentials, quit worrying about the few who feel inferior because you've done more. If you'll notice, most of the people who are arguing against the credentials on name tags have THEIR credentials listed on this board as their user names.

    Many nurses have different hardships they've need to go through in order to obtain their ADN, diploma or BSN. Sacrafices can encompass more then "extra time" and this is worth noting.

    My user name has mcl4 and no credentials listed. What user name are you writing about?
  7. by   Q.
    HEY - please, please please quit inserting YOUR comments into my postings. Thanks.
  8. by   liliana
    Dear Medic,
    your questions are the exact reason why we should do it!Yes we want everybody to ask us what does each of those letters mean.Our "voice" as a profession is still very weak ( inspite the power in numbers). We need any opportunity we can get to speak about what we do and what kind of education
    we have and continue to obtain.
    I am somewhat disappointed we are not asking to have our full names on the badges,but first names only?
  9. by   mcl4
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Susy K
    I also wear my nursing pin on my name badge. According to your argument, I am defeating the purpose of my name badge by displaying this pin.

    This is starting to not make a whole lot of sense at all.
    [/QUO

    This topic has gone beyond the orginal message that question what is placed on a name badge for nurses. It is up to the employer and the individual state board of nursing to decide what is placed on a name badge. What is most important is that you are wearing your badge while working since the facility could be fined if they find an employee not wearing their institution's name badge.
  10. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by Susy K
    HEY - please, please please quit inserting YOUR comments into my postings. Thanks.
    It isn't intentional. I split the message apart an answer each paragraph and this must be the reason it is happening? Other boards do not do this. Sorry.
  11. by   mcl4
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Susy K
    [B]And...back to the point of discussion:

    The original question was why should nurses be allowed to wear credentials on their badges? I guess I fail to see a solid argument in which doing so hinders patient care, or interferes with safe practice.

    Someone mentioned that name badges are meant to be used for ID and security reasons only; my name badge does that as well as serves the only place where I can proudly display my education. If I had an office, I would be hanging my diploma and my license on the walls.

    At the one facility where I am allowed to have RN, BSN after my name, I've had only good interactions and educational opportunities with patients who have asked me what a BSN is, how many years of schooling, etc, etc. Like I've said, I've had some patients who thought ALL NURSES had to have a 4 year degree. I've had patients whose daughters/sisters were interested in nursing school and were undecided about which program to go into, and asked me why I chose the BSN route. And I've had some patients who were fully aware of the various levels of nursing and commented on how they thought all BSNs were removed from the bedside. So you see, displaying my BSN only proved to help educate the public about the nursing profession and helped to dispell some myths.

    Perhaps it is the area you work in that these topics come up.
    I work on a busy surgical station and patients come and go so quickly, we've spent most of the time focus on post op and discharge instructions.
  12. by   mcl4
    Until someone can present an argument to me about how displaying your credentials is detrimental to patient care, I am all for wearing your BSN or MSN with pride. There is nothing wrong with it and we should be allowed to without criticism from our own kind. [/B][/QUOTE]

    It isn't criticism, it is a difference of opinion with what is the purpose of a name badge. A job title like nursing supervisor or DON will show the public this person has increase and different responsibilties in a hospital or nursing home setting. That is what is the distinguishes nurses from one in another. Is it only nurses who have attained a BSN or MSN who should feel pride? In all honesty, I think that the underlying tone that I felt with several, but not all messages on this topic.
  13. by   Stargazer
    Originally posted by liliana
    I am somewhat disappointed we are not asking to have our full names on the badges,but first names only?
    Liliana, I think this has a lot more to do with security than anything else. Patients/families with mental health issues or those who have had a bad outcome (real or perceived) have been known to stalk their caregivers and threaten or injure them. It has been a long-standing practice in ED's, but is spreading to other areas for the above reasons.

    I have been following this thread with interest. Since I am posting anyway, I have to say I am with Susy K. here. I used to wear my nursing pin and my hospital 5-year pin on my name badge, and I had many, many patients and family members over the years who asked me about them or where I went to school and what kind of degree I had. I would never initiate a conversation about this myself, but even in ICU, sometimes people want to be normal for a minute and talk about something other than their own illness.

    mcl4, as you say, the purpose of the name badge is for identification and for security reasons. I would argue that part of identifying oneself for informed consumers is to let them know your education and specialty certifications. And even if you disagree with that argument, since the listing of relevant licensure, degrees and certification does not interfere with that primary objective of identification and security, why NOT take advantage of the opportunity to display your credentials and maybe, just maybe, help educate the public about who nurses are and what we do?
    Last edit by brian on Oct 18, '06

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Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges?