Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges? - page 10

I have never had anyone give me a straight answear to this question, Why do nurses wear there degree on the badge uniforms? I see few other people in the hospital setting that do it except for... Read More

  1. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by mcl4



    I'm looking for an intelligent debate which lead me to sit and shake my head as I read your messages. When a nurse can not distinguish the different job titles in nursing, specifically RN/LPN/CNA, I found this to be unbelievable. If you read my message, I never stated anyone was forcing me to reply to messages and I'm quite aware of this. I was kicking myself for wasting my time trying to explain the difference between RN/LPN and I'm surprise you don't comprehend this.




    I also will clarify that the patients are not the only people that needs to know what the person's job titled is. For example, if I float to another floor, I rely on names tags to tell me a nurse's name and their license. If I need assistance, I go to different people depending on their job titled and what I need help with. I wouldn't go ask another LPN or CNA to give an IV push med for one of my patients since I know they can not do this.
  2. by   LPN_mn
    I am not sure when this started but it seems to me it may have gotten it's start when nurses quit wearing caps. It used to be that you could differentiate a nurse by the cap that she wore. But now that nurses don't wear caps this seems like the only way to tell an RN from an LPN or what kind of degree that each one has.
  3. by   Q.
    KC Chick-

    I am puzzled by your post. I never implied a better nurse is one with more education. Never. Ever. Ever. I have combed these posts and I cannot find where I stated this, or even implied it.

    And, I do understand the different roles of an LPN and a RN - HOWEVER, it is important to note that in some clinical areas, RNs and LPNs function within the same role. It all depends upon the state practice act in which they function. The POINT was, that the licensure that a particular nurse holds, such as RN, LPN, and even CEN or IBCLC, are in fact, credentials, as much as a BSN or MSN. My point was to make you see that by having a problem with a nurse having BSN after his/her name is NO DIFFERENT than having a problem with RN or LPN after his/her name. Lots of patients that I've spoken to also don't understand the difference in these roles - but the DO understand NURSE.

    In my area, we don't have RNs doing supervisory roles - this is often a misnomer as much as thinking that BSNs don't perform bedside care. When I wore BSN on my badge, my patients thought that BSNs don't "do" bedside care. What a wonderful thing to inform the public and dispell such as ridiculous myth. I guess if you can't see the benefit to informing the public about our profession, then I suppose I feel a little bit sad.

    And as a moderator, I am quite concerned about a member who is irritated with a thread. By merely making a suggestion I don't see how I am not living up to some "standard" of being a moderator. A moderator is entitled to an opinion just as much as anyone else. What I watch for, is expletives, racial and sexual slurs. That's all - sorry to disappoint you.
  4. by   Q.
    Originally posted by KC CHICK


    This is the message I was referring to. Please clarify what you meant if I got the wrong impression.

    Hmmmm.. Ok.

    Again, this goes to my counter-argument of why list RN or LPN on your badge? (aside from knowing who to ask for help as a co-worker, etc) I'm talking from the patient's standpoint. This debate ventured to the patient's standpoint of them "not caring" how much education their nurse has, as long as they are safe and competent. Yes this is true. And by the same token, couldn't we argue that most patients could give a rip about whether they have a RN or an LPN - but as long as they are a NURSE? Most patients don't know the difference anyhow.

    And the final comment - about patients not caring about the length of education - I guess what I meant is that in our profession, where we are struggling to identify ourselves and our job roles, education is important. The public has a general misconception about our profession and informing them about the levels of nursing is a start to dispell those ideas. I guess if I have a patient or Joe Blow off the street who doesn't really care if their nurse went the extra mile to get a BSN, or get a RNC, or get certified in fetal scalp electrode placement, well then to me, that patient is not acting as an informed consumer. And they all should. NOT to imply that if a nurse does not have these things, she/he is BAD - but I guess if patients/people had a greater awareness of the things that nurses CAN and DO know, perhaps we would be on the right path to gaining a little more respect for our profession as a whole.
  5. by   mcl4
    I graduated from my ADN program with some wonderful individuals. Two are newbies on the L & D floor in the same hospital as myself. I hope they absolutely do not come across any nurses that convey the same attitude as yourself. No, they are not BSN's. Yes, they will become caring, safe, and effective nurses.

    Argueing for arguement's sake does not a healthy debate make.
    (There, I think I put in at least 25 cents, not 2.)

    Question: Why would a 'Moderator' suggest that someone not participate??? Things that make you go Mmmmmmmmm. [/B][/QUOTE]



    I've been on a few boards, but I've been amazed that this board moderator is even participating. Generally, board moderators stay neutral in debates and act the role as moderator and do not debate the issues? Perhaps you need to look up moderator in the dictionary. I agree, things that make you go mmmmmmmmm This is the first moderator I've seen with a negative tone on any board, but actually she isn't the only one since there is more then one moderator posting here. You certainly are making an impression on new people who are posting here.

    I'm off to work a twelve hour shift. I've gained new appreciation with the staff I work with on a busy surgical station who respect each other based on the quality of patient care and working well as a team member or supervisor. Most nurses realize these two things are the most important part of being a staff member and giving patient care.
  6. by   mcl4
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Susy K
    [B]


    Hmmmm.. Ok.

    Again, this goes to my counter-argument of why list RN or LPN on your badge? (aside from knowing who to ask for help as a co-worker, etc) I'm talking from the patient's standpoint. This debate ventured to the patient's standpoint of them "not caring" how much education their nurse has, as long as they are safe and competent. Yes this is true. And by the same token, couldn't we argue that most patients could give a rip about whether they have a RN or an LPN - but as long as they are a NURSE? Most patients don't know the difference anyhow.




    Go back and read the post where I've included I, as a staff member, needs to know a person's name and job title. Patients have been inserted in this debate, but we all know staff needs to know what each other title is. You can't separate the two standpoints since in reality, staff has a real need to know who is who on a floor as well as their job title. "Nurse" on a name badge is not enough and you know this.
  7. by   BrandyBSN
    Im sorry, and I know this is completely off the current topic... but I had a question...

    The nursing caps? Since I have not been around that long, i have never actually seen a nurse wearing a cap. What did the different caps look like?

    And... back to the topic.

    I do agree that this has gotten a bit out of hand. Personally, my only true opinion, is that if a nurse wants to wear their degree (regardless of what the degree, diploma is) on their name badge, we should not discourage them from doing so. We are ALL (BSN, RN, ADN, LPN, CNA) proud of what we have done, and the job we do. Anything that you feel is appropriate, should be allowed to be there. Personally, when a nurse takes care of me, if she doesnt have her degree listed, i ask, just because i am curious. Its not that I would be scared if an ADN RN, or an LPN took care of me, because, they did take there test, and performed at the accepted level. I do like to know the levels of the people who take care of me, and those of my nursing peers, just because I like diversity, and it interests me.

    I have met nurses at all levels, and most have been wonderful. The ones that were not so great were from the entire spectrum, not all from the lower or the higher.

    Degrees on a name badge, no, might not be a necessary thing, but I like to see them. I will want to wear mine in 9 months. If you dont want to wear yours, its ok, it should be your choice, and if i want to wear mine, that should be ok too

    And just to dispell any myths? Regardless of your educational level, im glad we are all here, and I am glad we all try to give our patients the best, even when we dont agree as to what that is.

    BrandyBSN
  8. by   Stargazer
    Off-topic:
    Originally posted by mcl4
    I've been on a few boards, but I've been amazed that this board moderator is even participating. Generally, board moderators stay neutral in debates and act the role as moderator and do not debate the issues? Perhaps you need to look up moderator in the dictionary.
    Well, perhaps you need to look at a few more websites. I belong to 3 other boards in which the moderators frequently weigh in. Because it's their board and they happen to have, you know, their own opinions about some of the topics and discussions. Why would anyone take on the responsibility of starting a discussion board if they couldn't even have the fun of participating? It's not a formal debate, it's a discussion board.

    As this board got significantly bigger, Brian asked for volunteers from among existing members to help him moderate. Obviously, the most participatory members would be among those most willing to do so. I could be wrong here, but I'm guessing no one who volunteered to moderate ever signed a blood oath to never have an opinion again.

    We now return you to your previously-scheduled argu...er, topic.
    Last edit by Stargazer on Aug 16, '01
  9. by   prmenrs
    right on stargazer!
  10. by   SueBe40


    As a veteran in the nursing battle field for 14 years, I think RN is all that is needed on a badge.

    My years of working as an RN have given me the experience over a new grad with a BSN. What is disheartening is the fact that just because they have the RN, BSN on their badges, does not mean the patient will have better care. More initials do not signify better bedside knowledge.

    I have worked side by side with Diploma nurses who have more instinct into true bedside care than some BSN's. The patient population does not have a clue about the credentials. On my unit, a nurse with CCRN, behind their name still may not recognize the post-op complications that my ADN counterparts will be acting on immediately. It is experience to our given jobs that give us our authority not the letters.

    By the way -- I am an ADN and proud of it. I am currently pursuing a BSN in order to have mobility as a nurse. I am spending thousands of $$ to get $2.00 an hour more and be "qualified" to apply for positions I already do.
  11. by   NRSKarenRN
    From fiestynurse:
    Patients have a right to know who is taking care of them and what credentials this caregiver has. Since nurses don't have offices where their diplomas, degrees, or certifications can be displayed for patients to see (such as doctors who have their walls covered with this stuff) being able to display this on our name badges is important. Also, most of us don't have business cards that we hand the patient. All we have is our name badge. Wear it proudly!!
    From Stargazer:I would argue that part of identifying oneself for informed consumers is to let them know your education and specialty certifications. And even if you disagree with that argument, since the listing of relevant licensure, degrees and certification does not interfere with that primary objective of identification and security, why NOT take advantage of the opportunity to display your credentials and maybe, just maybe, help educate the public about who nurses are and what we do?
    These to quotes sum up my feelings on the subject. Thanks Suzy K: you've sumed up the PRO initials view well.


    To Brandy re caps:

    Nursing caps evolved from a time when many women wore head scarves while inside their home doing domestic chores. They evolved over the years in several ways from my memory.

    Some schools granted smaller student caps after completing probationary period or introductory nursing arts course. At Graduation from program/school you would receive the standard size cap. Other schools had one style of cap: you would get a different colored stripe based on educational level/year completed (most had three stripes). Final black stripe indicated you were a graduate nurse.

    Caps came in many different styles and different materials like organdy, which required starch and ironing weekly or cotton, wool etc.! Some were pleated, others straight as seen in todays nursing silouettes.

    A Presbyterain Hospital, Philadelphia nurse could be pick out instantly for their cap was unique in our area: instead of bring round, it was oval with DOUBLE pleats: top and bottom side of cap. (and a b...h to clean and iron my friend stated).

    Here is a link to pictorials of caps at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Nursing Museum.
    You can also check out some individual schools caps on left side links there.
    http://www.son.wisc.edu/~son/dean/al...aps/index.html

    Here is links to current cap companies :
    Kays Caps ( the best!) Download needed--http://www.kayscaps.com/caps.htm

    Also found the travel trunk(seems more costume like).
    http://thetraveltrunk.com/id19.htm


    SO....nurses have ALWAYS had a way to distinguish themselves from student to graduate and school to school. Some schools were noted to be top knotch and I can remeber a patient telling me he only wanted Presby or PGH nurses caring for him..." their care is great, they know what they're doing." Patients could tell the better prepared nurses, (after repeat hospitalizations) by their caps.
    NOW we have ID bages with credentials that tell us who we are and what lengths we've gone to educate ourselves about the nursing profession...an informed consumer will expect the best, most experienced person to care for themself. We have a NEW, somewhat less visable way of promoting ourselves but just as important.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Aug 17, '01
  12. by   mrains
    I am a little confused, I find there is very little difference in my wearing a name badge with a name tag and RN after it and lets say a Major with his name, and his insignia, and all his ribbons, etc. Telling not only what his rank is(I don't require SALUTING) and all but the different ribbons and medals tell where the man fought for crying out loud.

    Police, firemen, and the military all wear their rank on their sleeves, or shoulders. I only have a little badge telling the patients that I am the one who is responsible for their care, and the patients do read our badges and seem happy to see the alphabet soup after our names.
  13. by   RNforLongTime
    Stargazer, thank you so very much for claryfying for mcl4 about moderator participation.

    This topic seems to have become quite heated! Lets all just take a deep breath and relax!

    Thank You

    Kelly-

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Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges?