which way do i go?

  1. Hi, my name is Donna and I'm in my first semester of nursing school. I'm excited and yet at the same time, scared. This is something I've wanted to do all my life (my father's 2nd wife was a nurse). And now, here I am starting school at 30. I've done the military thing and the marriage thing, and now it's time I do my thing. I wonder what area of nursing I will really want to get into. I work as a bartender/cocktail waitress right now and it is such a high paced environment, I don't know if I can do just regular med/surg (even though I know there are days when med/surg can be high tempo too). I think I'd like critical care of some sort or maybe travel nursing...I'm single with no kids so that sounds appealing to me. Any words of wisdom, or is this going to be a decision that will have to come in time?
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   fergus51
    Hon, every day on med/surg is a high tempo day. It's why I left . Have you thought about the ER? The excitement never seems to stop and I think alot of travel nursing positions are available for ER nurses. I know a nurse/adrenaline junky who loves the ER and just got a VERY high paying job in LA.
  4. by   bemtrn
    Originally posted by DonnaRN2B:
    Hi, my name is Donna and I'm in my first semester of nursing school. I'm excited and yet at the same time, scared. This is something I've wanted to do all my life (my father's 2nd wife was a nurse). And now, here I am starting school at 30. I've done the military thing and the marriage thing, and now it's time I do my thing. I wonder what area of nursing I will really want to get into. I work as a bartender/cocktail waitress right now and it is such a high paced environment, I don't know if I can do just regular med/surg (even though I know there are days when med/surg can be high tempo too). I think I'd like critical care of some sort or maybe travel nursing...I'm single with no kids so that sounds appealing to me. Any words of wisdom, or is this going to be a decision that will have to come in time?
    Hello my dear don't be so confused, take the time from school to see which areas you like the most. I am an er nurse who came from the streets as an emt and i understand what you mean about high paced areas. One of the main reasons I got into nursing was because of the vast opportunites that nursing has. You don't have to commit yourself to one specific area, I recently got into critical care and i love it. i also love obgyn, and will be returning to school for legal nurse consulting. There is a wide field out there for you to try. Take your time, you will know what's right for you when you get there.
  5. by   ManyHatsToWear
    Don't worry about that now, just start in school because for the next few years you'll be experiencing many types of nursing.

    I'm in my first year of a 2-year clinical program, and some people in my class started school with a very clear idea of their direction, and others are taking the "wait and see" approach.

    I know many nurses who reinvent themselves to avoid burn out. They try a new area, train, do it for several years, than move on to other areas. Some become highly specialized in one area over many years so that their job is incredibly valuable.

    Just get it school, get the experiences, and your direction will become clear. You'll determine what you hate and love, and you'll meet plenty of people to help guide you!
  6. by   chaseloff
    I know exactly how you are feeling. I am a new GN and just graduated in december. I was also a bartender during college and wanted something fast paced. To be honost I had no clue what I was going to do until my last semester in nursing school. I loved Critical care and decided to start working in a Surgical Trauma ICU at the biggest trauma centers in south texas. I think that it is important to say that i am also single and have no children because in addition to being fast paced it is also mind boggling as a new grad. But I will tell you one thing, I LOVE IT!! I believe that this could be an interesting option for you as well but not many hospitals have a surgical-trauma icu, it is usually just surgical icu. The trauma part is the part that i like best but the ER in my hospital kinda misses out so to speak on the trauma because the critical patients go directly to surgery and then come to my floor. I say this because I did a rotation through the ER and it was not what I had expected. The CRITICAL patients usually are rushed off to surgery and you never see them again when you are in the ER.
    THere are probably several people that think otherwise and that is fine, I am only stating what I thought when I rotated throught the ER.
    Most importantly, I would suggest doing everything possible during nursing school and see what is available in your area that you are interested in. Beware though... Critical care can be overwelming though, especially as a new grad...
    Best wishes...
    Camille

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