Venting about a new CNA...this is really, really long! - page 5

by flashpoint

4,125 Views | 48 Comments

We have a new CNA that just started working night shift and she is going to drive me crazy. In the first place, she has been there for a total of five days and she is an expert on every resident in the facility. She is... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from phriedomRN
    From my 3 years as a CNA and almost 2 as an RN, I can attest the the responsibility of the nurses for the actions (or inactions) of the CNA. While what the OP did on one hall may technically be the realm of the aide, the responsibility for it falls squarely on the shoulders of the nurse. If the residents get skin breakdown, the nurse is going to be the one questioned about it, mainly "why didn't you make sure they were turned and dry?" It is the nurses responsibility to make sure the CNAs are doing the things they're supposed to (vitals, turns, baths, accuchecks etc) not the other way around. As an aide, I had to deal with a nurse who'd sit at the desk, reading Cosmo, yelling, "Is anyone gonna get all these lights!?!?!?!" When she said she'd changed someone, I just documented it on the rounds sheet as "Changed per M Lazy, LPN" I wasn't going back around and waking up a patient who had supposedly been changed, but I wasn't going to catch heat when day shift came on and found them soaked either.
    :yeahthat:

    As for the nurse that wouldn't get off her butt. Just this weekend I had the same problem with a nurse reading the newspaper. She asked me if I was going to get those lights because the noise was bugging her. I calmly walked right up to her and asked her if her hands were painted on. She got up.
  2. 0
    As an aide, I had to deal with a nurse who'd sit at the desk, reading Cosmo, yelling, "Is anyone gonna get all these lights!?!?!?!"



    Oh yeah, worked with one of those too, only her preferred reading was "Better Homes and Gardens" or "Southern Living". Brought a bag of mags every night.


  3. 0
    Quote from cotjockey
    Iím going to talk to the DON about it when she is in next week, but in the meantime, I am just going to grit my teeth and smile a lot.
    So, did you get a chance to talk to the DON?
  4. 0
    Sounds like a nurse I worked with. I won't go into details, but its depressing to think there are more like her out there. She worked construction before she moved in state and took nursing classes and was hired at a local hospital. I was a new grad and I never knew someone could be in so many places and know so much!! She also managed to make my patients made. Several told me not to let that b**** back in their room. When I quit, the nurse manager said it was my lack of confidence that made her have to check on my patients!! Oh, and I never heard of this happening but correct me if I'm wrong, but she was putting a foley in a male patient with the door shut and I could hear him yelling at the end of a 20-ft. long hall! When I made some remark about never hearing a patient yell so loud, her statement was, "He's a wimp."!!
    I don't know what it is, but nursing seems to attract people that like to bully others (patients and other nursing staff).l
  5. 0
    I had a CNA with this kind of attitude and behavior. I would feel very offended and defensive. Sometimes she would say things in front of the patient like, don't do this, do THAT! etc... She was so smart, I guess she felt she was smarter than most people and acted out of that. I did have to speak to her about her role and my role, and especially that if she had concerns she should voice them OUTSIDE of patient rooms. I did end up speaking with the nurse manager about her a few times but the NM wanted me/us to work it out ourselves (there were other nurses who had had trouble with her).

    She was also one to do her own work very quickly (TOO quickly I thought) - and be sitting on her butt while the rest of the CNA's busted theirs. So I would instruct her to "answer that call bell" or "Help the other CNA's to finish before you sit."

    After working with her and getting some of this through to her (ie insubordination, respect, etc), I realized that part of her attitude was frustration; and I kinda pushed her to go to nursing school since she WAS bright, knew her stuff, and WAS a natural leader. She has since enrolled in nursing school, and her attitude WAS better. I don't know how she is making out since I left the job - but all of the above did help.
  6. 0
    This type of CNA is the one that i would just take under my wing... nuture her need to be needed and fine tune that "can-do" attitude w/ a healthy dose of denture duty.... make her soak and polish everyone's choppers... and let's not for get the ever popular w/c cleaning... and you know, we really need to straighten up the linen carts, and etc.... she'd be MOMMY's LITTLE HELPER... and she would get busy work... every freaking hr and she'd earn her pay... I'd fix her lttle ol' wagon....lol
  7. 0
    My word, i have known so many CNA's just like her , it drives me crazy for they think they know everything.. As a CNA myself i find it tiresome and harrying to have someone make such a nuisance of themselves . Now if i were in your shoes as her direct supervisor i would have to be very formal with her ..First i would try to counsel her verbally , it seems as if you have tried this route already ,speak to your DON about the problem that you having with this employee , she may need to be written up or counseled further by the DON then maybe she would grasp some understanding of the error of her ways... My worry would be , if she treats her peers and supervisors with so little respect and consideration , i shudder to think how she would treat the residents , something must be done about this lady and quickly....
  8. 0
    The collection of "issues" this person has both on and off the job suggest that she may have some psych problems that you are in no position to deal with.

    What you are describing is the behavior of someone who has borderline personality disorder. To be fair, she may have nothing of the sort, but she ceratinly fits the profile.

    BPD folks are those who, for whatever reason, stopped their social and emotional development at a preschool level. They may have continued to grow physically and cognitively, but the part that interacts with others arrested way back when.

    Some of the characteristics--
    --They live in the extremes, tend to see things in black and white terms, blow hot or cold, and can do a 180 in the snap of a finger

    --They like to be the center of attention. It's all about them, and if it ever isn't, they do what it takes to yank the spotlight back where they believe it belongs. This includes being dramatic, using illness to their advantage, and bragging to the point where they sound delusional.

    --They seem incapable of empathy and cannot put themselves in another person's place without feeling like they've lost themselves. This is too scary too contemplate so they can't let it happen.

    --They are very poor at taking direction. Much like the two-year-old who insists, "I do it myself!" they think they have a better way. Or they just don't believe the rules apply to them. Speed limits are for other people. Job descriptions are merely suggestions.

    --They don't handle correction well. Even the most constructive criticism is perceived as a personal attack or persecution because you never did like them in the first place or you're trying to get back at them because they pointed out something you did wrong. There is little, if any, ability to separate their core identity from their actions, so if you offer any kind of critique, it means you have rejected them on a soul-deep level.

    --They have a ginormous sense of entitlement, which is appropriate in a toddler, but repulsive in an adult. The world lives to serve them. Rules are meant to be broken. You should welcome the chance to provide for them and theirs. You owe them.

    I could go on and on, but I'm sure you get the picture.

    BPD people are not hopeless, but they are wearying beyond belief. The only way to win with this kind of person is not to play. As Daytonite suggested, be absolutely clear with your direction, state what the consequences will be if she disregards your directives, and then follow through. If she does it right, praise her, being certain to link your approval to her exact actions. If she blows it, link your disapproval to what she did and write her up.

    Borderline folks have a seriously impaired sense of cause and effect and often truly do not understand why people get so bent out of shape with them. This further aggravates their feeling that the world is out to get them. And feeds their feeling that whatever they do is justified because they're only trying to survive in a hostile environment.

    The fact that her issues seem to pervade every area of her life means that you probably won't have much of an effect on her in the long term, but that isn't your problem. Right now, your job is to protect your residents, the other staff members, yourself, and your facility from the havoc that can be wreaked by such a loose cannon.

    I wish you well.
  9. 0
    Quote from rn/writer
    The collection of "issues" this person has both on and off the job suggest that she may have some psych problems that you are in no position to deal with.

    What you are describing is the behavior of someone who has borderline personality disorder. To be fair, she may have nothing of the sort, but she ceratinly fits the profile.

    BPD folks are those who, for whatever reason, stopped their social and emotional development at a preschool level. They may have continued to grow physically and cognitively, but the part that interacts with others arrested way back when.

    Some of the characteristics--
    --They live in the extremes, tend to see things in black and white terms, blow hot or cold, and can do a 180 in the snap of a finger

    --They like to be the center of attention. It's all about them, and if it ever isn't, they do what it takes to yank the spotlight back where they believe it belongs. This includes being dramatic, using illness to their advantage, and bragging to the point where they sound delusional.

    --They seem incapable of empathy and cannot put themselves in another person's place without feeling like they've lost themselves. This is too scary too contemplate so they can't let it happen.

    --They are very poor at taking direction. Much like the two-year-old who insists, "I do it myself!" they think they have a better way. Or they just don't believe the rules apply to them. Speed limits are for other people. Job descriptions are merely suggestions.

    --They don't handle correction well. Even the most constructive criticism is perceived as a personal attack or persecution because you never did like them in the first place or you're trying to get back at them because they pointed out something you did wrong. There is little, if any, ability to separate their core identity from their actions, so if you offer any kind of critique, it means you have rejected them on a soul-deep level.

    --They have a ginormous sense of entitlement, which is appropriate in a toddler, but repulsive in an adult. The world lives to serve them. Rules are meant to be broken. You should welcome the chance to provide for them and theirs. You owe them.

    I could go on and on, but I'm sure you get the picture.

    BPD people are not hopeless, but they are wearying beyond belief. The only way to win with this kind of person is not to play. As Daytonite suggested, be absolutely clear with your direction, state what the consequences will be if she disregards your directives, and then follow through. If she does it right, praise her, being certain to link your approval to her exact actions. If she blows it, link your disapproval to what she did and write her up.

    Borderline folks have a seriously impaired sense of cause and effect and often truly do not understand why people get so bent out of shape with them. This further aggravates their feeling that the world is out to get them. And feeds their feeling that whatever they do is justified because they're only trying to survive in a hostile environment.

    The fact that her issues seem to pervade every area of her life means that you probably won't have much of an effect on her in the long term, but that isn't your problem. Right now, your job is to protect your residents, the other staff members, yourself, and your facility from the havoc that can be wreaked by such a loose cannon.

    I wish you well.

    That describes her pretty well...wow.


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