Suny Upstate Peds

  1. I have some peds questions. I will be doing my peds rotation there. Even if you do not work there but do peds maybe you can help.

    I have dreaded my peds course from the beginning and now it is here. I am terrified, terrified of seeing terminally ill children, having to provide care to them and support to their families. I do not know if I can hold it together to do this appropriately. I am the type of person that can not even hear sick child stories, I know I need to just "suck it up" and realize life and death happens to us all but I am really struggling with this thought.

    I know there are different peds floors there, requiring different types of care, if you work there & want to pm me I will fill you in a little more.

    I guess my question is how do you deal with this? I know these are people that need care & support, but how do you hold it all together? I hate to sound immature but you people are angels, I don't know how you see it everyday and still function. The thought alone consumes me.

    Thanks for the help~
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   amy
    I haven't worked there, but in my experience, peds can be tough AND fun. Kids are still kids, and when you "play" with them, and make them giggle, they LOVE it. Yes, they have been dealt a lousy hand, and yes it sucks, but sometimes the best you can do is make this lousy thing not as bad as it has to be. I've also noticed that when a kid has a chronic illness, many of those close to them treat them different, as if they are 'fragile', and kids notice it, and do not like it! Yes, they may be fragile, but they are kids, and want to play and have fun. One example, I had a kid one time that broke his femur, in traction. Buddied up in a room with another kid, same deal. I used to joke with them that if we put them together, they could take turns, one being up and around and the other stuck in bed, as they broke opposite legs. Then one time I went up and one of them had a monkey w/ the velcro arms and legs, and a "baby" monkey with the same arms and legs, attached to his overbed frame. I started swinging it fast so it would spin around in circles, and every once and a while the baby would 'lose it's grip' and come flying off, onto the kids bed next door. They both giggled like fools everytime, however when the grandparents were there, they did NOT share in the funnies as they FREAKED whenever the stuffed monkey baby hit the traction lines. Never hurt either kid, and they LOVED it! They started calling their room "land of the flying monkeys!" Just remember under that illness they are a kid, and you should be fine. Kids are some of the toughest and easiest patients I know, and if I had a chance to work peds ER I'd do it in a minute!!!
  4. by   Mandarella
    Thanks for the reply amy, I am going to try my best, who knows maybe I will come out of this thinking it was the best experience in the world and want to go into peds...need to turn this fear around a little. Thanks again I appreciate your help.

    Quote from amy
    Kids are still kids, and when you "play" with them, and make them giggle, they LOVE it. Yes, they have been dealt a lousy hand, and yes it sucks, but sometimes the best you can do is make this lousy thing not as bad as it has to be. I've also noticed that when a kid has a chronic illness, many of those close to them treat them different, as if they are 'fragile', and kids notice it, and do not like it! Yes, they may be fragile, but they are kids, and want to play and have fun.
  5. by   TazziRN
    I understand your fears, and they are legitamate. Guess what? When you get there you will be absolutely AMAZED at the kids' outlooks and how they handle what's happening to them. Take your cues from them and their families. And don't be afraid to ask them questions, most are willing to answer and teach.

    As for handling it, don't be afraid to break down and cry. It's the human thing to do when one is overwhelmed by emotions.
  6. by   Mandarella
    Thanks TazziRN, I am starting to see it from another perspective, I am hoping to be amazed. And I will take their cues, it makes sense-thank you.
    Quote from TazziRN
    I understand your fears, and they are legitamate. Guess what? When you get there you will be absolutely AMAZED at the kids' outlooks and how they handle what's happening to them. Take your cues from them and their families. And don't be afraid to ask them questions, most are willing to answer and teach.

    As for handling it, don't be afraid to break down and cry. It's the human thing to do when one is overwhelmed by emotions.

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